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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, January 29, 1913, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1913-01-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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WILL CONSIDER
OTHER MEASURES
State Senate, After Defeating Suf
frage Bill, to Turn Its Attention
to Public Utilities, etc.
VOTE YESTERDAY WAS CLOSE
Seven Changed Views From Those
Held Two Years Ago But Meas
are was Lost by Three.
ENGLISH WOMEN ABE ABBESTED
Three Sentenced to Fourteen Days
Imprisonment For Besisting Po-
liceOne Refused Fine.
Mj Vslted Vreee.
St. Paul, Jan. 29.With the wo
mans' suffrage bill out of the way in
the senate, that body will now have
time to consider other important
measures, such as the proposed pub
lic utilities bill, the several amend
ments to the primary election law,
reapportionment, and the creation of
departments of public domain and
agriculture.
While the most ardent supporters
of the equal suffrage bill were hope
ful to the last that the bill would
-pass the senate, it has been appar
ent to the experienced observer that
the chances were against it.
With the same senators on guard
as were there two years ago, and
with one vote already recorded
against the hill, it seems that the
workers now concede that they prob
ably made a blunder when they did
not have the measure come up in the
house first.
Even now, there is nothing to
prevent the house from passing its
own bMl and again putting the.-mat-.
ter up to the senate, but with one
defeat, the enthusiasm of the most
enthusiastic worker is bound to be
dampened.
Three senators, S. B. Duea, Ruth
town W. B. Dwinnell, Minneapolis
and Manley L. Fosseen, Minneapolis,
this year voted for the bill although
they voted against it two years ago.
Their votes were off-set, however, by
the fact that four senators, H. W.
Cheadle, Duluth F. A. Duxbury,
Caledonia C. D. Johnson, Brainerd,
and A. C. Olson, Windom, changed
their votes from "aye" to "nay."
The vote was recorded as follows:
AyesBedford, Benson, Boyle,
Caahman, Clague, C. F. Cooke, Dale,
Denegre, Duea, Dwinnell, EHwell,
Foeeeen, Froshaug, Gunderson, Han
son, Haycraft, V. L. Johnson, Lende,
Moonan, Nelson, Odell,' Peterson,
Putiman, Rustad, Sageng, Saugstad,
Schaller, Sundberg,Thoe, Wilson.
NaysAhmann, Anderson, Car
penter, Cheadle, Coller, N. 0. Cooke,
Donaldson, Dunn, Duxbury, Glatz
toaoh, Gunn, Hackney, Handlan, C. D.
Johnson, Johnston, Klein, L'Herault,
McGrath, Harden, Murray, Olson,
Pauly, Poehler, Pugh, Rockne, Steb
bins, G. H. Sullivan, J. D. Sullivan,
Swanson, Van Hoven, Wallace, Weis,
Works.
All present and all voting.
There was a near fight at the door
of the chamber as the senators filed
out following adjournment. A man
in the crowd yelled:
"There goes the brewery bunch."
Senator McGrath* who voted
against the bill, took exception to the
remark and started for the man. Ser
geant-at-Arms Ege stepped in be
tween.
English Women Militant.
London, Jan. 29.The suffragettes
lost no time yesterday opening their
militant campaign, im DuWto they
niade a concerted attack at noon on
the windows of Dublin castle, a
number of wfrich were smashed.
Three suffragettes were arrested.
In London the suffragettes dis
played great vigor. "General" Mxs,
Drummond sent an ultimatum yester
day to David Lloyd-George, chancel
lor of the exchequer, after he had
refused, at her Tequest, to receive a
deputation of women on the ground
that he had another engagement..'
"I and other members of the depu
tation Intend to wait upon you in the
house.of commons at eight o'clock
evening,"- she wrote. "We trust you
will make the necessary arrange
ments to receive us/'
Mrs. Despard, a prominent leader
of the militant suffragists, and two
of her companions were* sentenced to
.fourteen days' imprisonment yester
day on the charge of resisting the po
lice in the execution of their duty
rwhen they dispersed a meeting in
'Trafalgar square Monday evening.
Mrs. Despard, who la
*M a^^a^a^A
a .sister,
Tffi!
s
WILLIAM J. FLYNN.
Recently Appointed Chief of
United States Secret Service.
?&$$<'*
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m*
1912. by American Press Association-
the famous cavalry general, Sir John
French, was offered the option of
paying a fine of $10, but she re
fused to accept this and was sent to
jail.
A fourth suffragette, who was
among those arrested, was sent to
prison for seven days.
MABKET LETTEB.
South St. Paul, Minnesota, Jan.
28, 1913.
Receipts
Cattle 2200
Hogs 6600
Sheep 700
Killing Cattle.
Steers $5.75-8:75
Cows & Heifers 4.00-7.00
Ganners .,_..
._*, _MJDb$.65
Cutters 3.50-4.00
Bulls 4.50-5.75
Veal Calves 4.25-9.75
Market Steady: Veal Calves 25 cents
higher.
Stockers and Feeders.
Feeding Steers, 900-1000
lbs $4.75-7.10
Stock Steers 500-900 lbs. 4.00-6.75
Stock Cows & Heifers 3.75-5.25
Stock Bulls 4.00-5.00
Market: Steady.
Hogs.
Price-Range
Today, Jan. 28 $7.26-7.40
Yesterday, Jan. 27 7.10-7.30
Week Ago, Jan. 21 7.15-7.36
Market 10 cents higher.
Prime butcher kinds at top.
Sheep and Lambs.
Spring Lambs $4.25-7.75
Yearlings 5.00-6.75
Bucks 2.50-3.25
Wethers 4.00-5.25
Ewes 2.25-4.75
Market: Steady 25 to 60 cents lower
ST. PAUL UNION STOCKYARDS CO.
EELES.
A daughter was born to Mr. and
Mrs. William Dandliker last Satur
day night.
George Dobson and family spent
Sunday at the Gibney home.
Wants Commercial Value.
A man would think a lot more of
:he Ten Commandments if he could
deposit them in the bank.New York
Press.
Paul's Turn Next.
The man who robs Peter to pay
Paul generally intends to strike Paul
tor a larger loan later on.'Puck.
Earthly Punishment.
The way of the transgressor is well
written UD.-Kansas City Journal.
SCOOP
THE CUB
REPORTER
*$
'V?,:N?-*Hqffi 6
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VOLUME 10. NUMBER 233. BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, WEBNESDlYcEVENING, JANUARY 29, 1913.
HUNG BY FINGERS
Minneapolis, Jan. 29.After sav
ing himself from falling with a lad
der which slipped from under him by
grasping a narrow window ledge,
John Simso, lieutenant of Engine
company No. 11, hung from the icy
ledge with one hand for several sec
onds before he was rescued.
As Simso was climbing the ladder
to open a window on the second floor
of the home of John Nehring, 2.635
Central avenue, which was afire, the
ladder slipped and fell. Simso reach
ed for the window. His left foot was
struck by the falling ladder, cutting
his foot and, jerking one of his hands
from the window. He had little more
than an inch of space to hold on to,
but managed to keep his jgrip until
a ladder was raised. The Injuries to
his foot were slight.
The fire-is supported to have orig
inated from a deefctive furnace. The
damage was estimated at about $500.
PASS RIVERS AND HARBORS BILL
Washington, Jan. 29.After days
of spirited debate, the house yester
day passed the river and harbor bill,
carrying 540,800,000 without an im
portant amendment.
CASTRO CASE TROUBLESOME
Washington, Jan. 29.An explos
ion is impending in congress over the
case of General Ciprlano Castro, for
mer president of Venezuela, whose
deportation is insisted on by the
state department.
A resolution will be introduced in
the house soon calling on the secre
tary of state for all the information
in connection with the action in
causing the European governments
to keep Castro out of the Western
hemisphere and in moving to exclude
him from the United States.
FOWLDS.
Who's who in Fowlds? John W.
Why? A new sleigh. i
v-GlrislMr. .J. W has been
seen traveling^ around in a new
sleigh lately we wonder why!
A schoolma'am.
Later reports are that the new
sleigh has been traveling around
looking for John. We wonder
where John was at! Better buy a
yoke of oxen, John.
Henry Pingel is logging this win
ter on his homestead near Island
Lake.
Chris Olson, of Island Lake, is
hauling cedar poles and posts to
Puposky.
Miss Ethel Pingel, who has been
visiting with her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. H. Pingel of Island Lake, for
the past week or two, has returned
to her home In North Dakota.
.Miss Ashby, of Illinois, is making
an extended visit at the home of her
brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and
Mrs. Otto Ashby, of this village.
Reports are that there area couple
of lady trappers in this vicinity. Be
ware you unwilling bachelors. Good
luck girls, as this is your chance.
Pa Hill was seen wending his way
northward last Sunday and we sus
pect that he is cutting a trail
through the woods for the children
of the north school.
Mr. Grutber visited with his friends
John and Gerry Mackey one day last
week.-.
Clarence Ford has sold his home
stead to some eastern capitalists.
One of our neighbors was met on
the road one day last week and we
hardly knew (new) him. The rea
son why? He had relinquished all
claim to the beautiful hirsute appen
dage that had previously adorned his
upper lip. What made you do it,
Jim?
Eilert Djoinne was seen going
through Fowlds last week.
Norman Williams has been haul
ing logs for Jim Pine.
Andrew Walker anticipates going
into the trapping business in the
near future. We wonder what he
thinks he is going to catch.
Willie Lietz was a Fowlds visitor
Sunday and also visited at his home.
Jte-tf
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LU&CIOUSI
FRUIT1
Total
fiofiensf
GOOD mre
Jll!
Oepyrlsht)
I6HKTW10
TH6 TftlMWIrtO
Of ^W ^PftlflC
1MT Wit 9t
THOROUGHW
Real
Frillts
Total amount of Poor Fund warrants issued..
Divided as follows:
For care of poor other than paupers $ 501.67
For burial of poor and paupers r... 103.00
For R, R. fare, poor and paupers 30.62
For hospital care and medicines 203.10
For .care of paupers at poor farm 1556.06
Amount of Poor Fund'warrants Issued for 1911-12..
Less amounts received from crop sales
Net cost for I9lli.\..."...
Comparisons: i 1911 1912
Cost of cities poor.. $3432.79 $2394.45
Average paupers per day at poor farm.. 8.7 -7.8
Cost of paupers per day at poor farm...?- .59% S .64%
FARMERS 1 FEB. 6
Will Be Held in Bemidji High School
at 1 p. m. Under Auspices of the
Commercial Club.
DISCUSS THE SHEEP PROBLEM
H. J. Maxfleld, state immigration
commissioner, Mr. Maglvny, presi
dent of the South St.. Paul Union
Stock Yards company, and A. E.
Chamberlain, development agent of
the Great Northern railroad, will be
the guests of honor at a farmers
meeting which will be held in the
High school February 6 under the
auspices of the Commercial club.
There will be a meeting for business
men in the evening in the club
rooms.
In a letter to J. J. Opsahl, Mr. Ma-aacres
givny promises to bring some sheep
men from South St. Paul so that the
farmers who attend the meeting can
get some definite information on the
market price of sheep and the best
way in which they can be brought
into this country. Mr. Maxfleld has
also promised to see some sheep men
and it is believed that they will be
accompanied by several dealers from
the cities.
Mr. Chamberlain, who is being
sent here by the Great Northern, will
arrive In Bemidji at noon. The
Commercial club is holding the meet
ing in order to find out if the farm
ers want sheep and If they do, the
best methods of handling them in
large lots so that the individual
farmers can buy them in small lots.
The meeting with the farmers will
be held in the High school auditor-
Oh, Yes, The Boss Is Very Technical
iJ
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SPRIN& HAT DECORATIONS
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5PIHO
COST OF CITWOOR FOR THE YEAR 1912NORTH
A
12394.45
|2394.45
$3600.14
168.35
$3432.79
Decrease.
$1038.34
:9
$ .05
ium' at'Tp.'. m. MrTliagiyny' Wlil
talk on "Establishing a Market" and
will present figures on the price of
sheep at the St. Paul markets for
some time past., Mr. Maxfleld was
formerly an attorney in Wadena and
had something to do. with the build
ing up of Wadena county into one of
the best dairy counties Jn the state.
Invitations were mailed today to
500 farmers living in-the vicinity of
Bemidji and special invitations have
been mailed to men in the small
towns in the brush country near Be
midji. A. E. Nelson and J. J.
Opsahl have charge of the meeting
and its particular object will be to
acquaint the.farmers with the value
of sheep as land clcarers and find out
how many will use sheep If they aTe
brought into the country.:
Mr. Opsahl has received word
from W. F. Dickens, superintendent
of the Red Lake agency, that 100,-
000 acres of good grass land to the
south and west of ,the lower Red
Lake can be obtained for grazing
purposes at a small cost, He has also
received an inquiry from a Western
sheep man asking for over 3,000
of range in one lot.
There is a possibility that a large
flock of sheep will be put on the Red
Lake reservation and stock will be
sold from the flock to the farmers as
wanted.
ADDITIONAL LOCALS.
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Sullivan and
children of this city-left this after
noon for Solway wnere they-will be
the guests of Mr. Sullivan's parents,
Mr. and Mrs. p. F. Sullivan for a
few days.
Miss Marie Klein" entertained a
number of friends at "Rummy" on
Tuesday evening. Those present
were Misses Jennie Newton, Mabel
Wager, Gertrude- Malone, Amanda
Klein, Jennie^Kittleson, ?Agnes
Faust, Dora- Barrette, Elizabeth
Eberleln, Mabel Kittleson, Emma
Klein-, Jessamine Peterson, Luella
Bailey and Christine Berggren.
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HAT I
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and Flowers to 3upplant Birds and Feathers on Spring Hats^-News Item*
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DAKOTA DRASTIC
Pure Food Commissioner Proposes
Law to Regulate Newspaper Ad
vertising of General Scope.
ELIMINATES MISLEADING ADS
By tralted FTMS.
Bismarck, N. D., Jan. 29.The
most a^vanc^rpqgition^for the^regu
latlon of newspaper advertising ever
undertaken in any state is proposed
under a measure suggested by Pure
Food Commissioner Ladd of North
Dakota. It is a "pure newspaper"
law, as relating to advertising. The
editor may prevaricate, mislead and
exaggerate in4 the editorial and
news columns of his paper to his
heart's content,,, but the advertisers
must not misrepresent.
The law is general in its scope. It
applies not only to food- stuffs and
to medicines and paints and articles
of that nature but also to all kinds
of wearing apparel machinery,
clothing, shoesin fact everything
offered for sale.
The proposed law will not only
stop exaggerated advertisements but
entirely eliminate misleading circu
lars, books and posters used by fake
doctors and fake food and medicine
and other commercial articles.
Shoddy clothes, advertised as real
wool, silk claimed to be pure when it
is forty to seventy-five per cent min
eral, shoes With paper soles, plate
iron machinery advertised as steel,
and thousands of other articles come
under the measure advocated by
Commissioner Ladd.
It-is the most sensational plan
ever suggested for the regulating of
advertisers and makes it as necessary
to tell the truth in-soliciting patron
age as on the bottles of medicine or
packages of food sold in this state.
It even reaches the almanacs and
calendars.
One of the strong points of" the
law is the manner in which it will
prevent the vendors of fake medicine
cure-alls from advertising In North
Dakota". The plan is attracting a
great deal of attention.
By "HOP*
MINNESOTA
^Sf|4-
HISTORICAL
*&
f TEN CENTS PER WEEK."
JACK PINE SOIL
GIVES BIG REM
D. A. Whiting, a Farmer in the Towit
of Northern, Jlore- Than Paid for
Clearing With First Crop.
LAND VALUE WAS INCREASED
Figures He Made |S8.10 on Five
and One-Half Acres After Pay
ing All the Expenses.
A HOME IN THBEE YEABS
Started With |500 Cash and Now
Has WeU Stocked Forty With
Twenty-five Under the Plow.
D. A. Whiting, a farmer in the
town of Northern, believes that Bel
trami county jack pine soil is a mon
ey maker. To prove It, he points to
his own experiences.
In 1910 &e bought forty acres on
which there was a clearing of about
eight acres. Mr. Whiting had a
capital of $500. There were no
buildings on the place. Today he
has twenty-five acres under the plow,
a commodious house,, a modern barn
in the course of construction, and
other necessary out buildings. He
bought this land for $300. He has
four head of cattle, three of horses
and necessary farm implements. The
farm today is worth conservatively
$2,000 and it is all clear. He has
made a good living for three years
on forty acres and has increased his
worth $600 per year.
OiC:what:,the,, laa* .I^IER^
Whiting submits the following ex
ample. He had a woodlot of five and
ontf-half acres which he hired grub
bed at $ 15 per acre. He ran over the
land once with a harrow and planted
three acres to fodder corn and the
balance he planted to rutabagas by
sowing them wild and running over
once with a harrow. It took two
men half a day to cut the fodder
corn. Figuring.his pay for labor,
the value of the seed, etc., at $10,
which he says is liberal, and the in
crease in the value of the land at the
cost of clearing, Mr.
Whitin'ig
this balance sheet
Total Net profit, one year
''if-ii^t
?8
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shows
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Return on Land.
Fodder corn, 3 acres..
200 bu. bagas, 20c
Increase in land value.
..$ 50.00 40.00 82.50
.$172.60
Cost.
Land, raw .$21.90
Clearing 82.50
Labor, seed, et?.
Total
10.00
.1114.40,
Mr. Whiting figured his rutabagas
worth at least the market price as
he is feeding them. He was offered
$50 for the corn as it stood in the
field after being cut but refused the
offer. He points to the fact that the
value of the crop paid for the cost
of clearing the land and also $7.60
of the $10 expense in.preparing/
seeding and harvesting the crop.
Four acres of potatoes last year
yielded him 600 bushels but the crop
was not normal. In other years it
has run over 200 bushels to the
acre. He had in fourteen acres of
corn which is furnishing feed tor
three milk cows,- a heifer, two horses
and a colt, Mr. Whiting's beet cow
took second prize in the three-year
old class at the county fair last fall
and he also had three heifers which
took a second each.
One of the Improvements he is
making on his farm is a barn which
has a floor space of 36x32. The stock
stalls are built in the basement and
the main floor of the barn is used for
hay^ fodder corn and a machinery
shed. The barn is located on the
side of a hill and the doors to the
stock room open on the south.
The stock room Is 22x32 and js
protected on three sides by a foot
thick cement wall and on the north
by a 12x32 root cellar^ In the
spring, Mr. Whiting expects to put
in a cement floor and a cement roof
In the stock room and wilf put
planking over the cement floor so
that it will not be cold to stand on.
Mr. Whiting Is treasurer and man
ager of the Farmers' Mercantile,
company and operates the -co-opera-
tive store owned by the company.
r^P
.$ 68.10
Jf
H#S "74
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