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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, February 27, 1913, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1913-02-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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WANTMORECASES
TRIED IN BAUDETTE
Attorneys From North End of County
Aik O'Neill to Introduce Bill
Amending Present Law.
JURORS FROM HOME COUNTRY
Measure Provides That Judge May
Excuse Those living: South of
Line Between Towns 156-157
CLAIM WILL SAVE MONEY
Say That Suits Involving Small Sums
Are Not Now Piled Because of
the Great Expense.
Attorneys of Baudette and Spooner
have united in backing a bill which
will be presented to the house by D.
P. O'Neill calling for the trying of
cases in district court in either Bau
dette or Spooner with juries drawn
from the country north of the Red
Lakes at the option of the presiding
Judge.
The bill is offered as an amend
ment to the present law which pro
vides that terms of court shall be
held in Baudette and that cases may
be tried there when both attorneys
in the case are willing to have it
transferred from the county seat. The
amendment provides that in all civil
cases where the defendent lives near
er Baudette than Bemidji, the case
shall be tried in Baudette unless the
defendant waives place of trial.
In the case that parties against
whom actions are brought live out
side of the county, the case shall be
tried in Baudette if the plaintiff
wishes subject to the right ~ot a res
ident of the state to remove the act
ion to the county of his residence.or
of a change of venue.
The bill provides that on appealB
from municipal courts or justices of
the peace, the appeal shall be heard
at Baudette if the court appealel
from is situated north of the town
line between towns 156-157, which is
north of the Red Lakes. By consent
of the parties, thereto, the appeal
may be tried in Bemidji.
Petit jurors shall be drawn for the
Baudette term the same as for the Be
midji term but the presiding judge
has the right to excuse from dut7
jurors living south of the town line
between towns 156 and 157. This
provision was inserted so that in
cases not of general county interest
the county will not have to go to a
great expense to get jurors to Bau
dette.
C. R. Middleton, S. M. Koefod,
and George E. Erickson, the three
attorneys of Baudette and Spooner,
who are here for this term of court,
agree that it costs so much to bring
witnesses and attorneys to Bemidji
that many cases are never brought
to trial as the amount involved is
less than the expense. They further
state that the round trip from Be
midji to Baudette cannot be made for
less than $13, that figure allowing
nothing for time nor entertainment.
An argument which they believe 13
a strong one in favor of the bill is
the fact that aliens have to appear
in district court in order to get their
naturalization papers. Many of the
homesteaders in the northern part of
the county are aliens and the cost of
two trips to Bemidji for themselves
and two witness for getting their
naturalization papers is so great that
many are forced to go without them.
At one term of court held in Baudette
fifteen men were naturalized and it'
was estimated that they were per
sonally saved over $1,000 in railroad
fares and hotel bills by not having
to make the trip to Bemidji.
The north country attorneys agree
that the bill does not materially
change the present law but allows
them to keep minor cases in Baudette
whereas the present law forces them
to come to Bemidji for trial if one of
the opposing attorneys so wishes.
The amending bill is based on the
law by which court terms are held in
Virginia in St. Louis county. It is
said that if the people of the north
ern part of this county can try their
own cases without the expense of
the roundabout trip to the county
seat, much of the county division talk
will be dropped.
FAST DELIVERY PROMISED
-*7 Wasted
Washington, Feb. 27.Ten cents
.additional paid on parcel poet pack
ages will enable senders to have their
parcels delivered as special delivery
letters are handled sow according to
now regulation Wednesday,
.sSSrfcwSUb
RAYMOND POIrvCARL
Latest Ptetw* of the
New President of France.
CLIP THE COUPON IN THE
SCHROEDER ADD FILL IT
OUT AND DROP IN THE PIO-
NEER BALLOT BOXSECUR-
ITY BANK CORNER.
ELKS MEET AT 7:30 PROMPTLY
Fun to Begin Early and Last Long
Special Social Program.
Promptly at 7:30 tonight, the rites
of initiation of eight candidates for
admission to the local lodge of Elks
will be started in the lodge rooms
on Third street. The officers of the
lodge believe that the initiation will
be over by eleven o'clock and the
members will then adjourn to the
city hall for a social program.
Players from the Brinkman will
use the stage and a supper will be
served about midnight.
WRESTLING GAME IS IN BAD
WITH THE CHICAGO POLICE
By Waited 9tmm.
Chicago, Feb. ^r.-^frrestllug"
Chicago has two roads before it, one
leads to squareness the other to ob
livion. On account of the number
of fakes and fiascos here the police
department has established supervis
ion of the sport and First Deputy
Chief Chuetler has been appointed
to take charge of it.
"I am in favor of the wrestling
game when its on the square, but
they will have to keep the game clean
or quit," said Schuettler. "Here
after the terms of promoters of these
matches will have to be submitted to
me in writing and unless I approve of
them the match won't take place. We
already have one wrestler, Martin
Plestina, on the blacklist and we will
enalrge it if necessary."
GEORGE W. FISHER BURIED
George Wellington Fisher was
born January 4, 1869, near Coles
burg, Delaware county, Iowa, and
died near Wilton, Beltrami county,
Minnesota, February 23, 1913. He i3
survived by his parents, Jacob and
Emmeline FisheL who reside on the
farm near Wilton two brothers, Rob
ert of Elkport, Iowa, and Lewis of
Wilton, Minnesota and three sisters,
Mrs. O. W. Webber, of Spirit Lake,
Iowa Mrs. H. S. Smock of Edgewood,
Iowa, and Kate of Wilton, Minnesota,
The funeral was held from the Luth
eran church near Wilton, February
25. Interment was made in Trefol
degheds cemetery. The religious ser
vice was conducted by Rev. Charles
H. Flesher, of the M. E. church of
Bemidji.
LACE MAKER IN CASS LAKE
Cass Lake, Feb. 27.Miss Alida
Smith of New York City, who has
charge of an Indian lace work estab
lishment in New York city, stopped
in Cass Lake Wednesday enroute
home after visiting Indian lace work
industries from California eastward
She was a guest of Archdeacon and
Mrs. Parshall while in Cass Lake.
GrWM THE CUB
OKuKJKJr REPORTER
aom,\f= AH^BODY
COME* UEHE-AND'
\Noy IN, see?
VOLUME 10. NUMBER 258. BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 27, 1913.
PASS OPBItL
By Waited VMS*.
Washington, Feb. 27.The senate
Wednesday passed the postofflce ap
propriation bill carrying $285,000,-
04)0.
The public buildings bill was then
called up and was debated last night.
OPEN FOR ENTRY
Spokane, Wash., Feb. 27.Be-
tween March 24 and May 8 the gov
ernment will throw open for public
entry 29,288 acres of farming, graz
ing and timbered land in Douglas.
Stevens and Pend Oreille counties of
eastern Washington. On March 24,
1,413 acres of grazing and farming
land in Douglas county will be
thrown open. On April 9 a timbered
area of 3,120 acres near Colville,
Stevens county, will be opened to en
try. The largest piece, comprising
22,194 acres of timbered land in Pend
Oreille county, will be filed May 1.
Much of the land is settled now, but
a great quantity still is available
NO RECOGNITION
Washington, D. C., Feb. 27.Prac-
tical recognition of the new provis
ional government of Mexico is not a
matter requiring the immediate at
tention of the secretary of Btate, and
he made It practically certain that it
is another subject to be left to the
new administration. In the opinion
of the state department officials of
the United States no interests in Mex
ico will suffer by withholding full
recognition, and necessary business
will be discharged under the exist
ing working arrangements which
Ambassador Wilson has set up. This
amounts to recognition of a de facto
condition. This is no wise commits
the United States government to ac
knowledgement of the legality of the
Huerta .government and the question
must be determined hereafter entire
ly upon the basis of performance.
ay Waited Tress.
Delafield, Wis., Feb. 27.Carlos
Madero, brother of the slain presi
dent of the slain president of Mexico,
yesterday received a telegram from
his brother Ervasto, a student at Cor
nell, asking him to meet him for a
conference during the holidays.
Young Madero did not know just
when he would leave for Ithaca.
ACHENBACH MAKES GOOD
Yesterday morning during chapel
at the High school period, Lester
Achenbach spoke in the assembly
room of the local High school on the
Philippine situation. Achenbach was
the first of the seniors to speak but
each Wednesday one of the seniors
will address the assembly on some
subject. The address by Achenbach
yesterday was well received and the
students are looking forward to some
interesting speeches from the rest of
the seniors.
CHICKENS WERE ROASTED
Cass Lake, Feb. 27.Fire early
Wednesday morning destroyed the
wood shed and chicken coop belong
ing to Herman Umlauf in the south
west part of town. Loss is estimated
at about $100. The chickens were
all roasted.
ADDITIONAL LOCALS.
Mrs. A .E. Nelson is confined to
her home with an attack of tonsilitis.
Mr. Nelson expects to leave Bemidji
Sunday afternoon for Fargo and will
go from there to Hope. Mrs. Nelson
will leave the middle of next week.
Mrs. A. E. Witting returned from
Shooks this morning after spending
several days with Mrs. C. G. Johnson
and friends in Blackduck. She was
accompanied to Bemidji by Miss Mary
Palmer, of Minneapolis, who has
been substituting in the Blackduck
schools. Miss Palmer will be her
guest for two or three days.
TWO INDICTMENTS IN
Grand Jury Holds David Dixon to
Forgery Charge and Ben Overby
For Grand Larceny.
FIRST COURT CASE FINISHED
The grand jury yesterday returned
indictments against David Dixon on
a charge of forgery and Ben Overby
for grand larceny. Dixon is said to
have passed forged checks on John
Bye and~A. N. Warner of Puposky.
The check on Bye went through the
bank and when one came in from
Warner, the handwriting was recog
nised and the man traced. He was
arrested early in December in Pu
posky.
The first case to come before the
court at this term, Christ Bolstad vg.
the Red Lake railroad, resulted in a
verdict for the plaintiff yesterday
afternoon and an award of $1,000
damages. The case of Ole Viken
against the Crookston Lumber com
pany was taken up today. It is a
personal injury case.
WILL ERECT A COTTAGE
Dick Gorman, who is playing at
the Grand this week, has decided to
build a cottage at Riverside and Is
having carpenters figure on plans.
Mr. Gorman bought six and a half
acres down river about four years
ago and has decided to spend his
summers in Bemidji. His neice, Miss
Nellie Bell, will probably spend the
summer with him.
And It Had Been Coming To Scoop For Three Years
WHA IS UNCL E SA SAYING rsr
GETS TWO QUICK FALLS
Hit Hiatt Downs Lars Iind By Pin
ning His Shovlders to the Mat
Twice in Tenstrike.
SECOND MATCH DDE MARCH 8
Special to *&- WUmmt.
Tenstrike, Feb. 27.One of the
best wrestling matches ever witness
ed in this locality was staged at
Jacobson's hall Wednesday evening.
Because Falls, the local man, was not
able to appear, Lars Lind of Farley
was substituted and made an excel
lent showing against Kid Hiatt.
The first fall was won by Hiatt
with a full nelson after thirteen min
utes and five seconds of fast work.
In the second fall Kid Hiatt was
quickly slapped on the mat in five
minutes and twenty-five seconds,
with a double arm lock.
The third fall was finally won by
the Kid after forty-four minutes and
fifty seconds of hard wrestling. Lind
was downed with a half nelson and
further arm hold.
Lind weighed in twenty pounds
heavier than Hiatt but worked on the
offensive throughout the last two
fails.- 'v--/^.
,-j. In the preliminaries R. Radschweit
and C. Hagadone made a creditable
showing for amateurs. Radschweit
threw Hagadone twice in succession
using a full nelson first fall and a
(Continued last pan).
Hon wilt be printed io this paper
THE CITY TE A! WINS
"Big 80^8^ Boys Run Away With
Younger Opponents By Score of
45 to 10.
McINTOSH TO BE HERE FRIDAY
Last night the "Big Bemidg" bas
ket bail team defeated five city stars
by a score of 45 to 10. Vernon Ma
loy and Eddie Ripple filled Neuman'a
position at center for the city team
The game was fast from the start but
the "Big Bemidgf' boys were too
large and fast for their opponents.
About one dozen spectators witnessed
the game. Coach Carson of the High
school team referred the game.
Tomorrow night the "Big Bemidg"
boys will play the Mcintosh team in
the armory. Mcintosh has made a/i
exceptionally good record this year
and will come to Bemidji confident
of winning. The visitors will bring
their own referee with them from
Fosston.
The game promises to be the fast
est and hardest fought game played
on a local floor this year as both
teams are confident of .winning as
they have both made equally stronar
records with other teams. The "Big
Bemidg" -boys have played four
games* this season and have won them
all by .large scores. %*&j- &^%
This will probably" be the fast
basket ball game played in Bemidji
this year by either the High school
or city team as nearly all the near-
rContlmied on last page).
K* '~**v*5
By""HOPr
!*g^
SENTIMENT ON
~B. SITE IS DIVIDED
i*j, '--v T-.#HX ^jrjrj^
Fifty-nine Percent of People Voting
-zzs'&M
on Pioneer Blanks Favor the.
Fenton Corner.
r'' %%-M
ODD FELLOWS PLACE SECOND M'
Lake Shore at Third Street Recom
mended as Large Part of Ex
cavation is Ready.
COSTS |800 TO HAUL MAIL NOW
Government Must Pay this if Office
is Over Quarter of a Mile From
the Depots.
The Pioneer has provided a means
by which every man and woman in
Bemidji can express a choice on a lo
cation for the federal building. At
this time, the majority appears to fa
vor the Fenton corner. If yon do
not want the postoffice there, this is
the time to say so. Clip a hailot and
vote tonight.
That there is a concerted effort
being made to have the federal
building, $75,000 for which was vot
ed by congress last week, located on
the northeast corner of Fourth
street and America avenue is appar
ent from the tabulation of the votes
which have been cast on the Pioneer
ballots.
At noon today the vote was counted
and percentages figured. The result
was as follows:
The table shows that if all of the
people who want the postofflce west
of the alley between Beltrami and
Minnesota avenues had agreed on a
site, they would have cast sixty-five
per cent of the vote.
Many arguments are being ad*
vanced in favor of the Fenton cor
ner. It is said that the land is
cheaper than the other locations and
more money would be available for
the building. It is central to a larg
er proportion of the residents and is
fairly central to the business district,
They say that a new city and hail
and postofflce on that block would
improve it so that portion of the city
would be better built up.
The Odd Fellows' corner is favored
because the present site is considered
central and is handy for the busi
ness men who make the-most use of
the mail. It is said that the building
would not necessarily have to be lo
cated in the -center of the city as the
residence sections are visited by car
riers and those people have few oc
casions to visit the office in person.
The Hakkerup corner is favored
by the men who want the postofiice
close to their places of business and
who believe It would have a material
effect on the building up of Third
street. They say that the excava
tion would be ready and a consider
able item of expense saved. The
lake shore could be cleaned up and
made one of the beauty spots of the
city.
Although but one per cent of the
vote has been cast for the Second
street location this has met with
favor because it would be within the
quarter mile zone of the railroad
stations and the roads would have to
deliver the mail free. In the course
of twenty years* this would save the
government many thousands of dol
lars. Another argument is that withC
the new Markham on one corner, a
new Rex on the other and a good
federal building between, the firsteu
Impression given to visitors and peo-^
pie passing through would be mostV
favorable. This location is equaHygJg
central for the retailers,* hotels.^^g
wholesalers and mills. |p^
Albert Worth, assistant postinas^gl
ter, stated this morning that it nowfe
costs the government I&00 per year
to get the mail to and from the trains.
Four years ago it cost $ 500. It takes il.
practically the entire time of onef*:"
man and the cost is expected to in
crease to $1,200 within a year' or
two. Allowing twenty years as the
life of the building, the saving io
the government en the Second street,
(CwatinaoS last safy.
-J3-
Per Cent.
Fenton corner i.-....... 69'
Odd Fellows' .V.?..~...V.J. ^26
Hakkerup corner 4-'
Third and America 4
Court house 3
Opposite Cochran's 2
Fifth and Beltrami
Opposite the Markham.... 1
/"""N^f
"355*,
"*3
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