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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, December 26, 1914, Image 4

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1914-12-26/ed-1/seq-4/

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LOOT FILLS
PATROL WAGON
$ew York Woman Bas Rec=
ord for Shoplifting.
229 ARTICLES IN ONE HAUL
tlx Skirts, Twenty-one Shirtwaists,
Five Sweaters, Two Muffs and Nu-
merous Smaller Things Found on
Her Person When Placed Under
Arrest. New York, Dec. 26.The record of
f.Sjioplifting belongs to Mrs. Julia Boda
jr'of Par Rockaway. Mrs. Boda, in one
..AA the department stores in Brooklyn,
.picked up 229 separate articles, includ
ing eighty-five handkerchiefs, six
skirts, twenty-one shirtwaists, five
sweaters, eight pairs of gloves five
books, three pairs of slippers and a
number of other things. The loot was
{taken from one store under the eyes
of two store detectives, who followed
her about from counter to counter
^from 11 a. m. until 3:30 p. m.
-t-. After making a haul she would dis
appear in the women's retiring room
rand return, ready for more loot. She
had two muffs when she was stopped,
one under her ccat and the other in
her hand. Both of the muffs were
found to be stuffed with goods. A
sweater which she had negligently
hanging over her arm also was found
to conceal more property. The Glad
atone bag was bulging with articles.
There were four shirtwaists in one
of her stockings and four pairs of silk
stockings in the other. Around her
body were sweaters and handker
chiefs and pieces of ribbon and other
Odds and ends of things she had picke:l
up. The pile filled the patrol wagon.
MUHfc SHIPS FOR PACIFIC
California Congressman Would In
crease Naval Estimates.
Washington, Dec. 2GWhen the full
.membership of the house naval af
/airs committee meets next week to
consider and determine a naval build
Ins program for submission to the pub
lic Representative Stephens of Cali
fornia, a member of the committee,
will insist on an elaboration of the
plan, so as to meet what he regards
as the needs of the Pacific coast.
He announces he will move to in
crease the number of submarines to
be authorized at this session of con
tres to sixteen instead of the "eight
pr more" as recommended by Secre-
rsDaniels
and that in place of the
torpedo boat destroyers also rec
ommended by the secretary he will in-
"'tat that the number be increased to
eight.
^Representative Stephens added
that,awhile he does not intend to take
any jingoistic attitude, he purposes to
insist that the number of battleships
be increased beyond the two recom
mended by the navy department.
CAUSES LOSS OF $700,000
Fire at Chicago Destroys Big Depart
ment Store.
Chicago, Dec. 26.While''the last of
a big crowd of Christinas shoppers
weie leaving the Julius Oupenheimer
department store the l/uilding was
sfhaken by a boiler explosion and
flames burst through the lower floors.
Within a few hours the building, a
five story structure, was in ruins. The
loss is $700,000.
Several firemen were injured by
falling bricks and one sustained a dis
located shoulder by falling from a lad
der.
The flames spread to two apartment
buildings west of the store and ten
families wer,e driven out in their night
clothing.
FEDERAL MEDIATION URGED
Labor Secretary Cannot Interfere Un
less Principals Ask It.
Washington, Dec. 26.Mediation by
the department of labor in the East
ern Ohio coal strike was sought by
Representative Francis of Ohio. About
16,000 men are idle in this territory.
The secretary said he stands ready
to offer the good offices of the depart
ment it asked to do so by the interest
ed parties, but that the government
cannot interfere upon its own initia
tive.
BftEEN PERSONS INJURED
T*Hey Car Goes Over Embankment
Into Swollen Creek.
Uniontown, Pa., Dec. 26.Fifteen
persons were injured, a number seri
ously, when a street car collided with
a wagon, jumped the track and rolled
over a fifteen-foot embankment into
rain swollen Redstone creek near
Leith. Fifty-four persons in the car
were rescued with difficulty. Many
women fainted and were saved from
drowning by other passengers hold
ing their heads above the water.
Confederate Officer Dead.
Lewiston, Ida., Dec. 26.John Lane,
major general of artillery under Gen
eral Robert E. Lee in the Civil war,
died at his home here. He was a son
of General Joseph Lane, former Unit
ed States senator and first governor of
Oregon.
Miner Convicted of Kidnapping.
Bozejnan, Mont., Dec. 26.A verdict
of guilty of kidnapping Martin Hark
1ns In Butte, Aug. 27 last, was return
ed here against Owen Smith, a miner.
The jury left the penalty to the judge.
I 'French Scientist Dead.
Paris", Dec. 26.The death is an
nounced of Professor Alfred Fournier,
member ot the French Academy of
iUdicine. He was born In 1832.
8te&*.
sis
HENRY A. DU PONT.
Delaware Senator Undergoes
a Serious Surgical Operation.
Photo by American Press Association.
United States Senator Henry A.
Du Pont of Delaware underwent a se
rious operation at St. Mary's hospital
at Rochester, Minn., for abdominal
trouble. His condition is said to be
satisfactory.
ROW OVER $1 JOB FATAL
Wisconsin Farmer Kills Blacksmith
and Ends Own Life.
Solon Springs, Wis., Dee. 26.In an
argument over the payment of a $1
account, Louis Kurilla, thirty-eight
years old, a farmer living six miles
west of Solon Springs, murdered Fred
Dickinson, aged thirty, a blacksmith,
by shooting him in the temple with a
shotgun.
After the shooting Kurilla attempt
ed to escape in his farm wagon, but
was overtaken by Deputy Sheriff Lord
and a posse of citizens. As he was
about to be arrested he shot himself
with the same gun and died an hour
later.
Dickinson had repaired an old wag
on pole for Kurilla. The argument
began when the latter attempted to
take the pole away after Dickinson
refused to grant him a few days in
which to pay the bill of $1.
TO APPEAL HARVESTER CASE
Judge Smith Grants Request to Per
fect Abstract of Evidence.
Council Bluffs, la., Dec. 26.Judge
Walter I. Smith of the United States
circuit court has granted a request,
of the International Harvester com
pany for permission to perfect an ab
stract of evidence filed at St. Paul,
Dec. 12, so that an appeal from the
dissolution decision of the federal dis
trict court, given at St. Paul, Aug. 12,
might be made to the United States
supreme court.
Dissolution of the harvester corpo
ration was ordered by the district
court to take place within ninety days
after Aug. 12, provided an appeal was
not made. This appeal will be per
fected soon with the aid of Judge
Smith's order.
GAMBLING TRUST ALLEGED
Chicago Combine Said to Make Profit
of $1,000,000 Annually.
Chicago, Dec. 26.Charges that a
huge gambling trust exists in Chica
go, which makes a profit of $1,000,000
a year and pays ?15,000 protection
money to the police, have been made
to the Merriam crime commission.
Monte Tennes, gambling king of the
city, is declared the head. Edwin W.
Altz, an investigator, charges that 300
policemen receive $50 for each hand
book operated.
AUSTRIAN ARMY LEADER
IS OUSTED.
Vienna, Dec. 26.General
Petiorek, commander of the
Austrian army which was re
cently driven from Servia, has
been removed from his com
mand. Archduke Eugene, de
vout cousin of Emperor Fran
cis Joseph, has been appointed
to succeed him.
Loses $40,000 in Holdup.
Kansas City, Dec. 26.E. H. Hobart,
am ining man of Denver, was held up
and robbed of stocks and bonds val
ued at $40,000 and $200 in cash. Ho
bart was met two blocks from the
Union station, where he had just ar-.
rived from Denver, by two men who
forced him into an alley at the point
of a revolver.
Swiss to Demobilize.
Paris, DrtC 26.The Swiss govern-j
ment has decided to order a partial I
demobilization, according to the Petit'
Parisien's Berne correspondent, who
says that 250,000 men will gradually
be released from duty.
FEWER BILLS IN HOUSE
Only 20,CG0 Measures introduced in
Sixty-third Congress.
Washington, Dec. 26.The volume
of bills, public and private, introduced
in the house during the present ses
sion is far below the average. Not
more than 20,000 of these bills have
been introduced in the Sixty-third
congress, with but a little more than
i two months of the third session to
run, while in the preceding congress,
the Sixty-second, the total was 28,846.
*&? e^Attj-UsH'^S
FAMOUS NATURALIST DEAD
John Muir Passes Away at the Age
of Seventy-six.
Los Angeles, Dec. 26.John Muir,
the naturalist, died in a hospital here
of pneumonia.:
i
v&L
He was seventy-six
years old.
Like John Burroughs, Muir was so
much a part of his work as a natural
ist that his output was as much litera
ture as science.
He was born in Dunbar, Scotland,
in 1838, and came to this country
when he was eleven years Old. He
was graduated from the University of
Wisconsin in the class of 1864 and
took up his work as geologist, explor
er and naturalist.
Muir discovered the great glacier
in Alaska in 1881 that bears his name.
His travels took him to Hawaii, Rus
sia, Siberia, Manchuria, India and
Australia. Yale, Harvard and Wis
consin granted him honorary degrees.
TO EXPLORE SOUTH AMERICA
Expedition of Naturalists Sails for
Peru From New York.
Washington, Dec. 26.An expedi
tion of naturalists who plan to ex
plore South America, particularly for
new specimens of animals, sailed from
New York for Peru. The party will
cross the continent from the west to
the east coast, moving from Peru into
Bolivia and on through Brazil to the
Atlantic.
The expedition will include Alfred
M. Collins, Philadelphia, and L. Gar
nett Day, New York, representing the
natural history museums of those
cities Robert H. Becker of Field mu
seum, Chicago, and George K. Cher
rie, who was one of the members of
the -Roosevelt expedition through
Brazil.
THE PIONEER MAKES THE
"-^f-i *a*ib"s?*rt*T^r'
ADDITIONAL WANTS
FOR RENTTwo steam heated
rooms. Suitable for office or
light house, keeping. Apply 116
3rd street.
Bibliographer It pead.^
Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 26.Luther
Livingstone, a bibliographer, widely
known, is dead here. During the past
year he had acted as librarian of.the
Widener collection at Harvard col
lege. He was formerly connected
with a New York publishing house.
FE-RU-NA
The Traveler's Companion
Mr. Arthur I*
Piercer 2618 Sher
i dan -Ave., 1 Sfc
Louis, Mo. "The
curative value of
Peruna is truly
wonderful, think
It especially val
uable as a specific
for catarrh of the
system, and for a
man who has trav
eled for years as
I have and who is
certainly exposed
to irregular meals
and uncomfortable
sleeping accommo-
dations, Peruna is
one of his best
and most needed
traveling compan-
ions. It throws
off disease and
keeps him well. I
therefore heartily recommend it**
Those who ~*bj*ot to liquid medi
cines can now Drocure Peruna Tab
lets.
AND NEW SUBSCRIBERS. READ THE CLUB COMBINATION BELOW.
With May Manton Pattern
INNOUNCEMENT
HERE'S THE CLUB OFFER
FARM AND HOME, subscription price per year $ -50
THE HOUSEHOLD, subscription price per year 25
TODAY'S MAGAZINE, subscription price per year 50
FARM, STOCK AND HOME, subscription price per year 50
The Bemidji Daily Pioneer 6 months or The Bemidji Weekly Pioneer 1 year. 2.00
COST OF ALL TO YOU*. $2.00
If you take The Dairy Pioneer for six months, or
":t
COST OF ALL TO YOU... SI 50
If you take The Weekly Pibrteer'one year
Fill out the coupon and send it in with the price-pf the club you select.
Do it TODAY tomorrow may be too late. :-i
i S&i'.iSV 2 *te*
Wfeen tin Wall Runs Dry
you will appreciate the convenience
and economy of having a reserve
supply of ink on hand. Come in
and letusshow you the newest ink-
Carter's"
Pencraft Combined Office
and Fountain Pen
Ink
W always try to have for our
customers all the new dungs of real
merit Pencraft ink is made espe
cially to settle the bother of having
one ink for fountain pens and an
other for inkwell use. We'll gladly
show you this unique ink in the new
flow-controller bottle.
THE BEMIDJI
PIOHEEB
Phone 31.
Special Bargai Offer
These 4 Magazines Absolutely Free With THE PIONEER
PRACTICALLY EVERY WALK IN LIFE AND YOUR CHOICE OF EITHER THE BEMIDJI DAILY PIONEER OR THE BEMIDJI WEEKLY
PIONEER ALL FOR THE PRICE OF ONE. THIS OFFER WILL BE MADE ^OR A LIMITED PERIOD ONLY AND IS MADE TO BOTH OLD
Total _.|3.75
You Can' Affor to Pass This By
THE PIONEER IS MAKING THIS LIBERAL OFFER TO ITS READERS FOR A LIMITED PERIOD ONLY. THINK OF IT, FOUR
MAGAZINES AND THE DAILY PIONEER FOR SIX MONTHS FOR THE REGULAR SUBSCRIPTION PRICE OF THE PIONEER, $2, OR
THE FOUR MAGAZINES AND THE WEEKLY PIONEER FOR ONE FULL YEAR FOR THE REGULAR SUBSCRIPTION PRICE OF $1.50.
THIS OFFER IS TO BOTH OLD AND &EW SUBSCRIBERS. THE OLD ONES ARE MERELY REQUESTED TO MAKE THIS PAYMENT
IN ADVANCE OF THE PRESENT TIME. CUT OUT THE COUPON ABOVE AND MAIL IT TODAY. NEVER BEFORE ^AVE YOU BEEN
OFFERED SUCH A LIBERAL OFFER, AND PROBABLY NEVER AGAIN.
Address All Communications to
The Bemidji Pioneer Pub. Co. Bemidji, Minn.
rC
W
OF A CLUB OFFER WHICH INCLUDES FOUR SPLENDID MAGAZINES COVERING
H,/*" Sr ..-i*
-%X
W~^&K0^^J^C$:":X^, &
'V&R&
Garbon Paper
ANY COLOR
108 Sheets to the box
Price $3.00
Bemidji Pioneer Pub. Company
Bemidji, Minn
Date
The Bemidji Pioneer Pub Co.,
Bemidji, Minn.
Gentlemen: which send me the
Name
If yon have a room to rent or
want to rent oneyou get the
bett choice through a Pioneer
want ad. Phone 31.
Enclosed please find $ for
Address
Daily or Weekly
Pioneer together with the club of four magazines
as advertised on your circular and in your paper.
I am a subscriber now _.-
I am not a subscriber
Please check one of the above --./j.--*^-
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