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The herald and news. (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, January 12, 1904, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063758/1904-01-12/ed-2/seq-1/

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s"ALISHED 1865NEWBERRY. S. C.. TUESDAY, JIANUARY 12. 1904. TWICE A WEEK. $1.50 A YEAR
GE. JOHN B. GORDON'
GONE TO HIS REWIRD
.ANOTER OF THE SOUTH'S GREK
CmEFTAINS IS DEAD.
ommander-In-Chef of the United Con
federate Veterans-The End Came at
His Home On Saturday Night.
Gen. John B. Gordon died at hi
winter home at Biscayne, Fla., a
io:o: o'clock Saturday night, afte:
being unconscious nearly all day
The beginning of the end occurre<
Saturday afternoon, serious compli
cations setting in, and by night hi
physicians had abandoned all hope
as his kidneys refuWed to' secret
.and uramic poison was very decided
.is death was quiet. He fell peace
fully to sleep-and all was over.
Gen. Gordon became ill Wednes
day afterr.on. with acute indiges
tion. He had suffered from the
same trouble in Mississippi many
months ago. At i x o clock Thurs
day morning a consultation of phy
sicians was held and it was found
that he was seriously and critically
ill. His son, Major Hugh Gordon,
who resides at Biscayne, was with
him. A telegram was sent to his
daughter, Mrs. Barton Smith, of
Atlanta, calling her to his bed side.
She was with him when he died.
Gen. Gordon grew steadily worse
until today, wien he was uncon.
scions most of the'tinic.
Gen. and X&Gordon had been
in Florida this winter only three
weeks before his death. His health
had been unusually good prior to
his fatal attack. He had bought a
winter home at Biscayne three
years ago, and had since been spend
ing a portion of his winters there.
Gen. Gordon's body was shipped
to his home at Kirkwood, near At
lanta, Ga., Sunday night, leaving
Biscayne at 8 o'clock, and reached
Atlanta Monday afternoon.
A Gen. John Brown Gordon was
born.in Upson count%, Ga., Feb
ruary 6, 1832. He was educated at
the University of Georgia, studied
law and was admitted to the Bar,
but had practiced only a short time
when he entered the Confederate
amy. He raised a regiment of caval
ry for the Confederate service, but
as that branch of the military force
was not then required he organized
a body of infantry, offered it to the
Governor of his State, and went in
to the field with his troops, who re
ceived the nickname of "Raccooz
Roughis," all the men having beei
raised on the Raccoon mountain.
In 186a Gordon, as colonel, led
his men into the famous battle of
the Seven Pines, during which two
-thirds of his command were eithe
killed or wounded. When Gen
Rodes was wounded he relinquished
his brigade to Gordon, The battle
before Richmond and at Malvert
Hill followed, and the gallantry o:
Gordon's brigade was conspicuoun
in each.
During Lee's march into Mary'
land Gordon was the first to cros:
the Potomac and for his coolness
bravery and skill was highly comn
plimnented by Gens Rodes and Hill
He also achieved great distinctio:
at Sharpsburg, where his regimen
occupied the salientWin the Confed
erate line. He was wounded fiv<
times durig the engagement, an<
but for the heroic attentions of his
ifew wo nidhave died. In speakinm
I of this battle Gen. Hill called Gor
>on the Chevalier Beyard of the
army, a character given the lament
ed Kearney on the Federal side.
r Upon recovering Gordon was
made brigadier general and invest
ed with the command of the Geor
gia brigade. A month later he was
in command at Marye's Hill, in
front of Fredericksburg, where he
captured the heights by a brilliant
tcharge.
r In 1864 he won his richest laurels
on the stormy lines of the Rapidan.
The Confederate troops had been
. obliged to retreat after a long en
gagement. Gordon saw the condi
tion of affairs and, suddenly turn
ing his men, he charged upon the
Federal troops, broke their line and
captured an entire regiment.
Immediatel, after entering York,
Pa., he met a large body of excited
women and made them as gallant a
speech as was ever spoken by a con
queror, concluding with the assur
ance: "I pledge you that not one
private dwelling will be burned or
robbed. So well do I know these
men, I can safely promise the head
of any one of them who insults a
lady."
In 1867 Gen. Gordon was the
Democratic candidate for Governor
of Georgia. His party claimed his
election by- a large majority, but
his opponent, Ruius B. Bullock,
was declared elected.
He was a member of the National
Democratic Convention of '68,from
Georgia, and a delegate at large to
the Convention of '72.
He was elected to the United
States Senate in that-year, and took
his seat in March following, suc
ceeding Joshua Hill, Republican.
His noble, untiring and b.:cess
ful efforts in behalf of South Car
olina during the great campaign of
1876 and the momentous months
that followed can never be forgot
ten here. ,Xn that tremendous crisis
quitting his home and laying aside
all other duties, Gen. Gordon came
to Columbia, and remained there,
working with Hampton and our
leaders until the Palmetto State
was redeemed.
He was re-elected United States
Senator in 1879. but resigned his
seat in i88o. In 1886 he was elec
ted Governor of Georgia.
Since his retirement from politi
cal activity he has devoted much of
his time in lecturing, presenting to
the North, as well as the South, his
lecture upon "The Last Days of
the Confederacy."
Since the organization of the
United Confederate Veterans he
has held the position of its comman
der- in-chief and his frequent re
elections to that position have testi
fled to the warmth of affection in
which he has been held in the South.
Only a few months ago his most
entertaining and instructive book
Li of reminiscences of the War for
fSouthern Independence was pub
lished. It has received very favor
able notices from critics in all sec
tions of the Union. Gen. Gordon
wvas a speaker of great eloquence
and was phy,sically and mentally
. istingue.
Of spliendid physique; intellec
tual forehead and a strikingly hand
some face, only s!ightly marred by
a scar upon one cheek, caused by a
Iwound received in battle, he would
i have been selected from among a
a thousand of his fellows as head and
..shoulders taller than all the rest.
GITIZENS' ETIG
FLOUNDERED AROUND.
HEARD COMmnTEE REPORT THAT LI
CENSE WAS NECESSARY.
Dicussed This Necessity And Appoint.d
A Committee To Secure Information
And Report To A Third Meeting.
Having heard the report of its
committee. in which it was submit
ted that the license ordinance recent
ly passed by council was desired
and desirable and giving a schedube
of licenses wh;ch the committee con
sidered just and equitable, the ad
journed Ctizens' meeting held in
the court house on Friday afternoon
floundered around for an hour and
a half seeking information of itself
as to the financial condition of the
town and the necessity for a license
ordinance, and then appointed a
committee to go to cotncil and se
cure the desired information and to
report to a third meeting to be called
by the chairman.
The discussion, as at the previous
meeting, was engaged in by only a*
very few of those present, but it
was evident that all were seriously
interested. The meeting had no
definite information whatever before
it as to the town's finances and,
therefore, could neither intelligintly
discuss the necessity for the or
dinance or take intelligent action.
It will no doubt have a good result.
however, if for no other reason than
it has caused the citizens to inquire
into and to take an interest in the
affairs of the town.
The meeting was called to hear
the report of the committee, appoint
ed at the meeting held on last Tues
day afternoon, to report to an ad
journed meeting upon the two fol
lowing poiits: First, was the license
ordinance passed by council desired
and desirable; Secondly, if the or
dinance was desired and desirable,
what was a just and equitable basis
for laying the taxation. The meet
ing assembled in the court heuse at
4 o'clock and during the proceed
ings there were probably zoo citizens
present.
MEETING CALLED TO ORDER.
The meeting was called to order
by Chairman Cromer, who read the
resolution appointing the committee
to hear whose report the meeting
was called.
THE COMMITTEE REPORT.
Dr W E Pelham, on behalf cf the
committee, announced that the com
mittee held a meeting on Thursday
afternoon, at which time the follow
ing action was taken.
First, it was decided that a license
tax was desired and desirable. The
vote upon this question stood x x to
8, only 19 members of the commit
tee being presen't.
Secondly, the committee having
decided that a license tax was de
sired and desirable, had adopted a
sched".k uf licenses, which it con
sidered just and equitabie and which
he rced, as fo!lon s:
THE cO3DITTEE~ S ScHEU~rLE.
Agents for, or dealkrs in fertili
zer (other than licensed mer
chants)-........-............... S 2 00
Agents for, or dealers in pianos
and organs either or both
other than liconsed merchants 10 00
Agents for, or dealers in sewing
machines (other than licensed
merchants).. .......... ....... 20 00
Agents for, or dealers in light
mlng rods........................ 2500
Agents for, or diealers in coal
I(other thanlicensed merchants) 5 00
Agents for, or dealers in maps,
1roke neapers,a perionials
and other like articles (other
than licensed merchants who
deal in same) per day $5.00 or
per year .......................... 20 00
Agents for enlarging pictures
per day $5.00 or per year....... 20 00
Agents for retailing goods, per
day $10.00, or per year. ....... 100 00
Agents or dealers selling mules
or horses, or cattle, either all
three, at public auction only,
per day $25.00, or per year... 50 00
Agents or dealers (other than
lieensed salestables) selling
mules or horses, either or both
per week $6.00 or per year...... 25 00
Agents: or dealers in fruit trees,
per week, $5.00, or per year... 20 00
Agents for. or dealers in real
estate;selling or renting (other
than licensed lawyers)........... 00
Bakeries...................... ............ 5 001
Bali, public (when admission fe
is charged per night).. .... ..... 2.00
Ban:zs, capitalized at $50,000, or
less ...... ............. .................. 50 00
Banks, for every $10,000 in ex
Zess of $50,000 ..................... 10 00
Barber, for -.ch shop ........ ...., 5 00
Blacksmiths, for each shop. ..... 5 00
Bill Poster........ ...... ........... 15 00
Boot or shoe shop, making or re
pairing ... ........ ................... 2 00
Bottleing works, soda water or
otherwise ............................ 5 00
Building & Loan Associations,
savings or investment compa
nies and all companies or cor
porations (except licensed
banks,) engaged in the sale or
purchase of real estate, or
loaning money on real estate or
otherwise .............................. 25 00
.parding house, public.. ... 1 00
Bookstores are licensed as mer
chants ........---. .................
Chiropodists, per week, $3 00.
per year.. ............................. 10 00
Circus, with or without menag
erie, per day, with street pa
rade ................................... 10D 00
Street parade alone.................. 50 00
For each side show per day....... 10 00
Cleaning, dressing or dyeing
clothes, (other than licensed
tailors) .................250
Coal dealers, alone...,............... 5 00
Contractors or buil -for con- ,
tracts under $500.. ...-. 2 00
Contractors or builders, for con
.tracts over $500 and not ex
ceeding $2500.................. ..... 10 00
Contractors or builders, for con
tracts over $2500 and not ex
ceeding $5000 ....................... 15 00
Contractors or builders for con
tracts over $5,000 ....... ... 25 00
Commission merchants or com
mission brokers, each or each
firm and for each place of busi
ness ..................... ... . ...... 10 00
Cotton mills or factories, for
each $50.000, or fractional part
thereof of its capital stock...... 12 50
Cotton Seed Oil Mills twenty-five
cents on the $1000........
Cotton Seed Oil Mills that manu
facture fertilizers .. .... .. ... 60 00
Cotton gin and press, 1 to 5 gins
inclusive twenty-five cents on
the thousand. . ... ......... .....
Cotton gin and press, over 5
same rate............................
Cot ton buyer, each firm, etc...... 5 00
Cotton seed buyer... ........ 1 00
Cotton weigher. ...................... 5 00
Conveyancer, drawing deeds,
mortgagages, or contracts for
compensation (other than li
censed lawyers)........ ............ 5 00
Dentists or tooth extractors,
each ................... 5 00
Dogs, upon each and every dog
the owne'r or person - upon
whose premises the same is
kept shall pay the sum of...... 1 00
Druggists, licensed as merchants
Exchage, buckets shops (firm
individual or coiporation) car
rying on the business or deal
ing mn options, futures in cot
ton, grain, provisions, or other
supplhes, on margins or other
wise........................... 10 00
Express companies, each for busi
ness done within the town of
Newberry, and not including
business done for the United
States Government, or any
business done to and from
~oints beyond the limits of this
tate................ ........ 50 00
Flying Jenny........... .....50 00
Flying Jenny for less time than
one year at the rate of $10.00
per week......................
Fresh' fish...................... 1 00!
Hotels, each.................... 10 00~
Horse or mule traders (other
than licensed sale stables) . ... 10 00
Hocrse or mule traders transient
per week......................... 600'
Ice dealers, retail, each, house
or place of business... .. 5 00
insurance comnieis each life
f ire o: accident.............. 5 00
iunk shop. or scrap iron dealer 1 00;
Jeees jicensed as merchants.
ixerosine Oil C0s.. having an
agency or office in the towvn of
Newberry, or a stationary or
portable tank or tanks for re
ceiving and storing oil, selling
or delivering oil within the
limits of said Town, each.....100 00
Kerosine oil companies or agen
cies having no stationary or
portable tanks, but selling in.
original packages ach......-5 00
Knitting Mills Twenty-five cents
on the thousand.............. ......
Laundry, steam, or agent for
steam laundry........................ 5 00
Lawers, each ...... . ............ 500
Lumber yards, or dealesr......... 5 00
Liver7y, feed and sale stables.... 1500
Marble yard.............. ........ .. 500
Merchants;-All merchants shall
pay a license or privilege tax
according to the following
schedule:
Twenty-five cents on each thous
and dollars capital..................
Manufacturers of coffins twenty
five cents on the thousand......
Newspapers and job printing
each, 25 cents on every thous
and capital stock .............
Oculist, or optician, per week
$5.00, per year........... ...... 25 00
Piano and organ tuner or re
pairer, per month $1.00, per
year ................. .................. 5 00
Photographers, for each place of
business .............................. 5 00
Photo aphers, itinerant, per
we .- ........................ . .. ...... 5 00
Physiciens ............................ 5.oo
Physiciaans, itinerant, per mth 10 00
Restaurant ...... ..... ................. 1 00
Stab!c, sale only ................ 10 00
Tailor, merchant....... .............. 5 00
Tailors, not merchant, engaged
in making or repairing, or
either .... .............................. 200
Telegraph companies, or agencies
each for business done in the
Town of Newberry, and not
including any business done
for the United States Govern
ment, or any business done to
or from points beyond the lim
its of this State..................... 100 00
relephone Companies, for busi
ness done exclusively within
the Town of Newberry, and
not including any busi
ness done for the United
States Government, or any
business done toorfrom points
beyond the limits of this State loo oo,
UndertakersorEmbalmerseither
or both........ ....................... 5oo
Warehouse, for storage by the
public twenty-fivecents on the
thousand..................
Woodyard ............................. 1oo
Mr. F. H. Dominick wanted to.
know if the committee had any
notes to show what changes, if any,
bad been made in the license ordi
nance as passed by council. He
iidn't think those present were suf
iciently conversant with the ordi
3ance to get an intelligent idea of the
:ommittee report without a com
parison of this kind.
Col. George Johnstone moved
:bat 'he report of the committee on
he first point be received as infor
mation. That left the question open
or debate. He was opposed to the
:onclusion reached by the majority
>f the committee.
The chair held that there ought
-o be-a motion either to adopt or re
ject before the house before the
liscussion proceeded.
Dr. Pelham moved the adoption
:t the report of the committee on the
irst question, as to whether the or
Sinance was desired and desirable.
Col. Johnstone, continuing, said
there were certain methods of impos
ing a license system that he favored,
but he did not favor the method ad
opted by council or a majority
of the committee.
The State wisely placed a limit
upon the tax to be imposed
upon a man's property. There
were certain trades which paid no
tax, while the merchants here paid
their tax. If there was a phase of
the question which was just it was
that which would require a man
who comes here temporarily to bear,
not an exorbitant, but a just pro
portion of the burden. But the
miet hod here proposed put a tax
upon property and then required a
tax from the owner for handling
that property. A license was an
addiitional tax. His chief reason
for opposing this system was to
bring before the citizens the ques
tions he was about to propound:
Could any one here tell him how
much money comes into the town
trasury as a result of ordina

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