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The herald and news. (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, December 14, 1915, Image 6

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America Near
With At
Question of Continuing Dipl
Receipt of Satisfactory Re
to Note on Ancona Sinki
Reconizes Gravity of
Silence?New Comp
Connection With
Washington, Dec. 10.?Diplomatic
relations with Austria are in grave
danger of being broken off over the
sinkin? of the Italian liner Ancona
with the loss of American lives. All
officers here continue to maintain si
Jence, but through the veil which nas
been drawn about the situation is seen
a crisis just as grave as that which
attended the submarine negotiations
with Germany.
The question of continuing diplomatic
relations may be said to depend
upon a satisfactory reply to Secretary
Lansing's note, which now probably is
before the Vienna foreign office, de- (
o TrnXVn 1 fh O I
iliailUiU^ CL U1CU ? V " Mi Vi. V^AV 0 ,
of the Ancona, reparation for the live3 |
lost and assurances that passenger
ships shall not be attacked without
warning or an opportunity for noncombatants
to take places of safety.
The situation tonight is tense and
fraught with possibilities. It Is compared
to the last days of the Arabic
legotiations with Germany when probably
no one but President Wilson himself
knew how close the country was
to a severance of diplomatic relations
-ivit'h "Rprlin
Officials of the state department will
not discuss the American note even so
far as to say if they know whether it
has reached Vienna or when they expected
to permit publication of it in
this country. It is taken for granted
in official circles generally, however,
that the communication, cabled last '
Tuesday, must have been delivered before
this anr? a reply is anxiously jawaited.
|
AnA+liar ortmnliVotiATi rlorolnno^ + /"?_ r
^UXV/CU^i UV ? V4V^/VVA w
day when it was disclosed that an Austrian
submarine which shelled the 1
American Standard Oil tank ship Petrolite
in the Mediterranean last week
ALLIES SOT ANXIOUS !
FOR PEACE JUST >0W j
Entente Capital Reflect Germany's At-'
titude on This Side of >Vur?British
and French Troops Retiring
!
Ixmdori, Dec. 9.?The speech in the
reichstag of the imperial chancellor,1
Dr. von Bethmann-Hollweg, reviewing :
the military, political and economic
progress of events, and his reply to a j
Socialist interpellation declining to in- '
itiate peace negotiations, were the features
of the day's news throughout
Europe.
Following closely Premier Asquith's
somewhat similar reply to a question'
in tho Viniico nf r>/-immrmc hv "Philin I
Aii V41V UUU v * VV44****V*iW V J ? *?* ? f
Snowden, Socialist, the chancellor's
-speech has completely dashed any
iopes the peace advocates may have i
held on any early termination of the j
war. It caused no surprise, however, I
to the great bulk of the people here,!
who, like the governments, believe in
the ultimate victory of the entente allies
and express the determination to
continue to fight until victory is attained.
As far as the entente allied coun
tries are concerned, seemingly me oniy j
change desired is one which would in
sure a more vigorous prosecution of;
the war, but this, like peace, will have j
to await events, for the whole cam- i
paign is entering a new phase.
Having arrived too late to prevent i
invasion of Servia, the British and
French forces in the southeastern part
of Servia are retiring before the onslaughts
of the Bulgarians, who, supported
by German artillery and in
fantry, have been attacking both the |
British and the French, compelling ?
them to give up advanced positions, j
According to reports from Saloniki'
the retirement is being carried out
in. an orderly manner, but how far it
is to continue is a matter of muih
speculation Opinion is divided as to
-.vhpthpr it wrmlri hp better to abandon .
tho entire expedition or retain Saloniki
:as a base. The litter alternative would,
ht Is believed, further endanger the re- ^
Nations of the entente allies with ]
^Greece, which even now are far from i
satisfactory, and be an inducement to j
she central powers to follow the entente
forces across the Greek frontier.
Besides the battles in the Balkans
the British are watching with deep in- ,
lerest the operations in Mesopotamia, :
where a fight is taking place for Kutel-Amara,
and in Arabia, the Turks j
in the latter region having commenced .
another advance on Aden. As Aden |
and its vicinity, as well as the shores '
J
a Break
tstria-Hunga ry
omatic Relations Depends on
ply From Dual Monarchy
ng? Official Washington
Situation But Keeps
Aication Develops in
Petrolite Attack.
4ent aboard a party and took part of
the ship's provisions. This news came
In a consular dispatch from Algiers
and was the first official word of the
safety of the Petrolite which was not
greatly damaged by the shelling, and
proceeded to Algiers with one man
'slightly injured.
So far as the Petrolite incident is
concerned there probably will be no
action by the state department until
more reports are received showing the
exact circumstances under wmcn tne
Vessel was attacked. If the tanker was
shelled while trying to escape in disi
regard of warnings there would be no
-'complaint on that score. When she
I did not stop and submit to search,
however, in the view of officials here,
Ahe submarine commander on finding
-her a neutral ship, bound on legitimate
'business, had no right to seize her
property.
Warships in the past, when in dire
need of food for their crews, often
Iholri nrv rncrohantmpn without regard i
to their nationality and carried off j
what they wanted, giving receipts t#
assure ultimate payment for what was j
taken. Under such circumstances, it j
is said, the governments concerned i
'have not been inclined to regard the !
proceedings as a serious breech of j
their rights, provided a merchantmen
was nr>t left without suDDlies to mak<?'
her voyage.
Seizure of supplies from a neutral j
vessel by a submarine raises a new1
and interesting point in international j
law. It is pointed out that if this!
practice became general, belligerent j
'submarines preying upon an enemy's!
commerce would be practically unlim- J
ited in their radius of action and al-!
most wholly independent of a base of
supplies.
I
? j
of the Straits of Bab el ,'M.andeb. leading
from the Red sea to the Gulf of
Aden, are well fortified, it is not be- ;
lievea an advance is seriously intend- .
ed there.
There.also was considerable activity
on the Gallipoli peninsula, but there
have not been any important changes
in the situation of the troops. This
likewise applies to the Western front,
where the French are busy in an ent
Y-nnAi:oi> o in f Vl P
Ufcl V 1.71 L\J ICIUIU a, M v. 11V" v.
Champagne region which the Germans
captured a few days ago.
AN INSECT MARVEL.
I
j
furious and Complex Is the Tongue of
the Butterfly.
Of all the marvels which the
world of insect life is so kich none is
more curious and remarkable than the
tongue of the butterfly.
This is always of great length. !
When not in use it is coiled like a I
watch spring in a fiat spiral close to
the head. But when tbe butterfly visits
the flower on which it feeds the j
tongue is uncoiled, tbe t*4? inserted j
deep in the heart of tbe flower and tbe '
juices sucked up. |
Tbe butterfly's tongue really consists !
of two tubes. Each of these bus a :
concave inner face, wbose edges in-!
teiiock one with tbe other, so as to \
form a third or central tube.
In butterflies we have tbe highest;
development of the iusect race, so far J
as beauty is concerned. In other re- j
speets. however, they do not hold so j
high a place. They are outranked in I
intelligence by ants, bees and wasps j
and in perfection of external parts and j
mech inical excellence of the joints by j
beetles.
The colors and patterns on the wings ,
which make butterflies so beautiful are !
due to the arrangements of innumerable
scales that can be distinguished
only with a powerful microscope. In
some cases these scales are toemseives i
colored, but often the effect of color is j
only optical, due to the reflection of j
light from the delicate ridges on each
scale.?New York American.
No. Six-Sixty-Six
This is a prescription prepared especially
or MALARIA or CHILLS & FEVLR
Five or six doses will break any case, cn?
f taken then as a tonic the Fever vrill no
eturn. It acts on the liver better tfco
Calomel and does not gripe or sicken. 25?
Piles Cared In 6 to 14 Days
?our druggist will refund money if PAZO I
DINTMENT fails to cure any case of Itching. ' 1
Blind, Bleeding or Protruding Piles iu 6to 14 days >
The first application give- Ease and Rest- 5")c.
2ures Old Sores, Other Remedies Won't 7ur&.
The worst cases, no matter of how long standing,
are cured by the wonderful, old reliable Dr.
Porter's Antiseptic Healing Oil. It relieves
Paia and Heals at the ?ame time. 25<50c, $1.00
in mode
Sjf is MO LAS
down, the feed bill an
i Red f
j Sli HorseandMdli
; It's something the horses ar
appetite?starts the saliva
lllllo Far superior to an all grain
|||# mules a treat, and at the same
mf Our RED SHIRT (first grade)
^(<4' contains Corn, Oats, Ground A1
fJ" and pure cane molasses, and ana
Protein 10%; Fat 3%; Fib
, PIEDMONT HORSE & MULE MOLASSI
12%; Carbohydrates 55%.
| ISWAMP-FOX HORSE & MULE MOLASSES FE1
i S
x T?pnrr/*nAir Tinner 0 MITT r CT?m (Dry
! $ rumxuiun iiuiul a itiule, nm Moia
^ Protein 12%; Fat 3%; Fibre 12%; Carbol
| grain and ground Alfalfa Meal.
I * RED SHIRT
^ First Grade: A balance^ ration contai
^ keeps them in good condition. Increases t
^ at a reduced cost of feeding:. Contains
|j[i Ground Alfalfa, Pure Cane Molasses and
^ Fibre 12%: Carbohydrates 60%.
| PIEDMONT DAIRY FEED gg-cgSfe
| | RED SHIRT HOG FEED
We manufacture also RED SHIRT Scrati
! K "SEVEN EGGS A WEEK" HEN MASH }
Bice, Cottonseed Meal, Cow Peas, M
Protein 18%; Fat 4%; Fibre 12%;
I As shown on tne Dags in our aa. near
products, even to the bass and twi
for Oats, Corn, Wheat, Alfalfa
| We also carry a^full
Our feeds as she
7 ^VL ?n BC'ent^C P^h
} Molony J
j^besw , 'miiuww^-vw7-\, " a,." 'nuftwr^jsa
(flOur Grea
II A YEAR'S READING FC
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ i<> ^--. o
WfF::i " j :id J;
The Best Two for All tl
in The
THE HOUSEWIFE
We are happy indeed to introduce an<
able to make a clubbing arrangement th
enable our readers to have The Housew
coming year.
The stories are high-class in every
stories that will appeal to and pleas
many with gripping excitement and ir
holding qualities.
Particular attention is given by The
wife to seasonable, sensible cooking, hoi
hints, and matters of particular intei
mother and child.
The Housewife is a larsre. well printed
zine; subscription price, 50 ct-nts per ye
is only because the publishers are anxi
develop their subscription list in the Sou'
we have been able to secure a rate or
subscriptions that enable us to include it
year's clubbing offers with The Prog
Farmer. We know you will be highly ]
if you decide to take the club, includii
Housewife.
This great combination of farm
fancy work and good cheer for th
BARGAir
is connection with your subscript
THE HERALI
You know our paper. It is a <
weekly?your county paper. It gr
important news of the world and t
You cannot attord to miss tms j
The Herald and News 1 year..
The Progressive Farmer?we<
The Housewife?monthly .....
Regular price
OUR SPECIAL B
All three one year e
(only 3 cents a week f
Mail or bring your subsciptions
THE HERALI
NEWBER
? ?MB?^?hi I I nwiMw
__ . {
All Married Men Knok,
"Should a man lie to a woman?"
asks Edna Wooley. Don't know about
that, but it depends on just haw large
the wife is and what the consequences
to the husband be if he didn't lie. All
married men know what we mean.
All the world may love a lover, but
J
it isn't every suitor that suits.
J
'H imr?*0 SHIJ*T S
ssrcW 6S,s
ses. it cots ^ taj^^ - paos^ti^%
,A Kuilrl% nn the etock. * _ ;v%8
Shirt gWTJi
iMOLASSESFEED^B
id mules like?gives them an
running and aids digestion.
feed. Give your horses and
i time save money.
Horse and Mule Molasses Feed Y^=?
falfa, made appetizing with salt ||||
Jyzes as follows:
ire 12%; Carbohydrates 57% ===?
i'C rprn Second Grade ? Analyzes: Pr-?- wSS
J? tein 9^9c: Fat 2y2%; Fibre ^
r?rv TTiJa onoTvrps: Protein 9%;^
Mil Wiu uiou?/ _
? Fat 2% I Fibre 12%; Carbohydrates 55%. ^
Mixed) Wemannfacture also a dry mixed (no \
sses) Horse and Mule Feed, which analyzes: |
hydrates 57%. This is composed of straight $
DAIRY FEED * [
ning Molasses. Cattle are very fond of it? >
he flow and enriches the quality of the milk ?
ground Corn, C. S. Meal, Wheat Middling, ;
Salt. Analyzes: Protein 15%; Fat 3%; ?
\
-Analyzes: Protein 12%; Fat 2^%; Fibre x
drates 55%. ^
of Digestive Tankage, Ground Corn, Rice ^
7 fattening. Keeps the hogs in good condition, fth
:h Feed and RED SHIRT Baby Chick Feed, ^fni
Composed of Ground, Corn, Ground W||I|
)ats, Ground Wheat, Barley, Maize,
eat Meal and Linseed Meal. Analysis: ? -
Carbohydrates 40%.
ly all of our feed is made from Carolina
ne. We are, therefore, in the market
Hay and any other kind of Haystock
of GRAIN, HAY
STRAW.
test Offer
>R THE ENTIRE FAMILY
\DE FOR YOU
The Progressive Farmer is made to cover
onditions as they are in the South. Yes,
ir?made for you?and if you will read
nd heed its teachings you will raise more
otton per acre, more corn per acre, more
nd better livestock, and make a money
roducing factory out of your farm.
\DE FOR YOUR WIFE
The Progressive Farmer has the strongst,
most practical household department
f any agricultural paper in the South. Its
lany features make a special appeal to
ur women readers and help them as it
ocs the men.
\DE FOR YOUR CHILDREN
The Progressive Farmer has a regular
L-partment for farm boys and girls, and a
irial story for both young and old. In
ict it is a paper for every member of the
Lmily.
le Family?Both Leaders
ir Line
h?,.. 1
sense, farm help, fiction, fashion,
ie entire family at
* PRICES
on to
) AND NEWS
rlean-cut, live, up-to>date county
ves you all the local news and the
he great war.
great bargain.
1.50
skly?52 big issues 1.00
50
$3.00
ARGAIN OFFER
ach lor only ?1.98
or all three).
i at once to
) AND NEWS
RY, S. G
^ u
IIliAliO -Lifjiiid s.nicVc: rou can't affor
i not to use it. F v serves the meat
and saves loss weight, and costs very
little. See us for circulars regarding
it. Summer Bros. Co.
ll-30-2t
Liverpool Salt?The best for salting
meat. G-et it at Johnson-McCrackin
Co. 12-3-tf
Christmas H
The Charlestc
Carolina Railwa
I excursion ticket
| Holidays, tickets
| ber 17, 18, 23, 2'
limit Jan. 19th,
For rates, etc
agents or,
ERNEST V
! Gen. Pa
Agi
I
I .
Prizes <
By Pepsi-Cola
H. A Pittard, who ma
tling plant in Newberry,
poems by children. The
be worked around the di
I
the word "Pepsi-Cola" m
either with a rhyming w<
appropriate connection,
follows:
For the best poem J
For second best $2.50
All children every wher
these prizes.
The contest ends 15th
Send poems to the I
Nev/berry, S. C.
5# ^
Great I
Serials h
| The year 1916 >
) will be crowded with
\ the very best reading in
Mils!
| 9 Great Serials ,
CUT THIS OUT
and send it (or the name of this paper)
with $2.00 for The COMPANION
for 1916, and we will send
rprp AH the issues of THE COM*
" < PANION for th: remaining
weeks of 1915.
? -LT/MfP
2V U L' L' 1 nt tUIHTAlVUH nuini.
r FLCJL CALENDAR for 1916.
TWFW The 52 Weekly Issues of
inCJX THE COMPANION for 1916.
SUBSCRIPTIONS RECEI
1 llll Ill I?iBIWIIIBII II IWIII MM
j Rising S
4 SELF-RISING AND I
j ^ 'jT
I Made of choicest Red 1
4 and prepared according
iHr flio+ hoc moHp flip n
k 11J UlUi UUJ UXUUV V-ULV v
ville, Tenn., nationally
I a? msmasi
^ grocer. You'
QPr a.XHF'
\
oiiday Rates
in and Western 4
y will sell cheap
s account of the
i on Sale Decem4,
25,| 1915, final
1916.
4
apply to ticket i
WILLIAMS, 1
ss. A eft..
usta, Ga.
*
Offered
Bottling Works *
nages the Pepsi-Cola Botoffers
several prizes for
/ /i-w i i <y? i) j.
"roeucai enusions' must
rink Pepsi-Cola; that is,
mst be used in the poems, j
>rd or in some good and
The prizes will be as'
?or third best poem $150 \
For the fourth $1
e are invited to try for
4
day of December, 1915.
'epsi-Col Bottling Co.
impMon J'
250 Short Stories i
D A M-i - J 5
l\aic r\iu^icd? iiatuic auu v j
Exceptional Editorial Page, Family \
Page, Boys' Page, Girls" Page, Chil- S
dren's Page. All ages liberally c *
provided for. S
Twice as much as any magazine S
gives in a year. Fifty-two times )
a year?not twelve* <
Send to-day to The Youth's Com- \
panion, Boston, Mass^ foi )
THREE CURRENT ISSUES-FREE. ^ )
VED AT THIS OFFICE f ^
<W.V4*UMUSESOHBHHBI
un Flour |J
IEADY PREPARED,
-4
^ ? ? A
j ! - *
2? |
Winter Wheat, ground
r to the suoerior aual- b
Id RED MIL J, Nash- \ j
- famous. 1 m
i M
IN to any good 5
U be pleased. j

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