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The herald and news. (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, March 10, 1916, Image 6

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PAGE REFiliES 10 '
Sl'ANl) BY fRESlDEM
TAR HEEL CONGRESSMAN SAYS
HE WILL NOT Rl> AGAIN
"I Will >ot Stultify My Conscimcf or |
Stain My Hands With the lilood of
My Countrymen,'* He Said.
Washington, March 7.?Robert N.
Page, of the Se.enth Congressional
district, sharply surprised his col
leagues and friends last night when J
lie announced that he would not be a j
candidate tor renomination in the ap-1
proaching primary. His action was |
the result of the recent demand by i
President Wilson that Congress vote j
upon the resolution c* warning to j
Americans.
Mr. Page calls attention to the fact i
that he presented to the committee aj
resolution expressing confidence in j
the president, and that the president j
is not satisfied with an unreserved expression
of confidence. "This shifts
io ine consciences ana convictions or
members of Congress a responsibility
that the constitution imposed upon the
executive. Having the responsibility T
thrust upon me. I claim the right to
e-\er<isc. my own judgment and con.ic
tions and not have them dictated by
some one else," said Mr. Page.
His let; er. which is addressed to the
Democratic voters of his di trict. is
filled with striking expressions and is
frank to a startling degree.
"I cannot gain the consent o my
conscience much as I would like to
gratify ;he president, and meet what
seems to be the demands of my constituents.
regardlesc, of my conscientious
? - i
convictions, to in evry matter vote as
the president requests, thereby assuming
responsibility for the loss of a sin- j
gle Americans' life, or even indirectly
siain my hand with "his blood. In this
instance 1 am sure that I am in possession
of acts which a partial press
has kept the people I represent in ignorance."
Continuing. Mr. Page makes a quo
i n ficm Christ. "Where your treas..:v
is there will your heart be also.''
He declared that the loan of $">00,000,000
to England by American capitalists.
to say nothing of the profits
nf mnriifirm mnniifaptiirprs "Vmo I
si roycd the semblance even of neutrality
in the United States and will
probably lead us into war. I have no
prc-Gcrman or pro-anythinz senlinicru
or inclination other than proAmerican."
'..'r. Paage says further, "1 will not
stultify my conscience or stain my
bands with the b'ood of my country-'
men: neither wi'l I do violence to my
conscientious convictions of duty
thereby for eiting my self-respect.''
Washington, March 7.?Representative
Sherwoo:! c. Ohio, announced to
day, following the policy of Representative
Page, that he would withdraw
from politics because he can not agree
with President Wilson.
MOTHER TELLS HOW VINOL
Made Her Delicate Boy Strong
New York City. ?"My little boy was
in a very weak, delicate condition as a
result or gastritis and the measles and
there seemed no hope of saving his life.
The doctor prescribed cod liver oil but
he could not take it. I decided to trv
Vinol ?and with splendid results. It
seemed to agree with him so chat now he J
is a strong healthy boy. "?Mrs. Thomas
Fitzgerald, 1090 Park Ave., N. Y. City.
We guarantee Vinol, our delicious
cod liver and iron tonic, for run-down
conditions, chronic coughs, colds and
bronchitis.
l rl, jr AV WoiiLr Il-riicrorT^fc V til' _
ITXl U'vi I! vvaoj A/i J
berry. S. C.
DUELS OVER TRIFLES.
At One Time Aimost Any Incident Was
? an Excuse For a Meeting.
Duels at one Time were foujiht for ,
the merest trifles. Colonel Montjjom I
try was shot in a duel about a dog.
Colonel Ramsey in one about a sonant.
Mr. reatlh'rsione in one about a
recruit, Sterne's fatlier in one about a
jroose. and another gentleman in one
-.) ...? .. ->f o m ill i\mi<w Ollf> <)1S
il UUl I U" "i U11^ - V --- ^
cor wns rhallenued for merely asking
liis opj>oiieiit lo pass liim a iroblet. An
other was compelled to tight about a
pinch of snuff. General Carry was
challenged by a Captain Smith for declining
wine at a dinner on a steamboat.
although the general pleaded as
ciot rrino invariably made
SIX CAV uot ItiCil * ?4^v ... him
sick, aud Lieutenant Cowther Just
his life in a duel because be was re-!
fused admittance to a club of pigeon
shooters.
In 1777 a duel occurred in New York
between Lieutenant Featherstonbaugh
of the Seventy-fifth and Captain McPherson
of the Forty-second British
regiment in regard to the manner of
eating an ear or corn, one conieuuuus
that the eating was from the cob and
the other contending that the grain
should be cut off from the cob before
eating. Lieutenant Featherstonhaugh
lost his right arm, the ball from his
antagonist's pistol shattering the limb
fearfully, so much so that it had to be
amputated. Major Noah lost his life
in 1827 at the dueling ground at iiouoken
in a simple dispute about what
was trumps in a game of cards.?Londonjphroniclt.
I
A i?tory cf C:d Irorsid.s.
Our <?i i!u? most famous of the Con
sii,ii?ii s exploits was during the war
ut Is; 11'. when sht' escaped from
liroRc s squadron. ainon.i: which sue
had accidentally fallen. The sea was
almost a dead calm, so Captain Hull
had :?> rescrt to towmg. All her boats
were lowered. with long lines attached,
and in addition [lull had ropes spliced
together make a line half a mile
t/i i\% I ?!/ !? K/\ nil i bnrl'rA u n.
?? U1V. li 1IV (UUIV <4 c*v unv, Uil
chor. This was carried in a boat half
a mile ahead and dropped, when the
crew hauled the ship rapidly forward.
The commodore of the English squadron
soon adopted the same tactics, and
if it h;id not been fur a breeze spring
injr up the Constitution would have
hpon r-nnfnrrul
"? ?
A Barnum Story.
A story is told of the meeting of
Matthew Arnold with P. T. Barnum.
the great showman, in America. Mr
Arnold when introduced said how
proud be felt at making the acquaintance
of a inaii with a worldwide reputation
"Ah, Mr. Arnold." said Barnum,
"we ;U'e both public men. but the
difference between you and me is that
you are a notability, while I am only a
notoriety "
i
Nc Need of a "Front."
"That shabby tonkin.? old fellow is
worth several millions."
"You surprise me Why doesn't he
went bone:* clot lies V"
"Oh. lie doesn't have to borrow any
money fYoj.le come to him to borrow
it " Birmingham A .^e-II era id
MixeJ In His History,
"Was Koine founded l>y Romeo?" inquired
a pupil of the teacher.
"No. my son." replied the wise man;
T u lif.r it - h . i m-.i Li /I V\ rr
ii \\<i> tMiiiri \> uv >> ?u"5 i uuuu ucau ur i
liomeo."-Strny Stories.
Yes, Indeed.
"Th* meek may inhurrit th' earth, al!
right." nuirmured Cnele Ike. "but he's
in luck if some cuss not so durned
meek don't contest tb' will an' git
awav with it!"?Judge.
i
i
I
11I mm I I
\\w\\w<# ^N.
A Few Hours Real
Pleasure in the 1
(Evening j
ry^HE bright
I light of the I
Rayo lamp I
I makes reading and
sewing real pleas- ( :
ures these evenings.
Rssfo
^ y
Lamps
j The Rayo gives a
1 t /vli f f O f"
5LCctVJ.y ligli L iiiai i
can't hurt the eyes. !
It requires almost |
no attention. Its i
simplicity of design j
makes it easy to j
keep clean. You j
i 1
don't nave to re- i
move the shade to
light it?just lift the
gallery and touch a
match. Most convenient
? most
efficient ? most
economical.
Use Aladdin Security
Oil or Diamond White I
Oil to obtain best results I j
in Oil Stoves, Lamps and
Heaters.
The Rayo is only one
of our many products
especially suitable for
use 011 the farm.
Standard Household
Lubricant
Standard Hand Separator '
Oil
Parowax
Mica Axle Grease
Eureka Harness Oil
Matchless Liquid Gloss
If your dealer does not I
carry them, write to
our nearest station.
STANDARD OIL COMPANY
(New Jersey)
BALTIMORE
1 Washiniton. D. G. _ Charlotte, N. C. j
I Norfolk. Va. Charleston. W V a.
Richmond. Va. Charleston. S. C. |
WALL STREET AT WORK.
The Big Morning Rush, the Lull and
the Afternoon Spurt.
Wall street comes to work late, the
mail is opened and hosts of problems
present themselves therein for adjust
ment. If Wall street works only five
hours it works under pressure. Its
telephone is the busiest in the world,
and Wall street's chief telephone exchange
has a most erratic traffic movement.
Up to 0 in the morning the number
of calls passing through the various
branch exchanges in Wall street would
make the telephone of any rural village
ashamed of itself. Yot tliey handle
between 0:4-") and Hi:ir> in the
morning the greatest number of calls
of any telephone exchange, and in the
terms of the trathe engineers the peak
of the load is re.ichcd. Naturally this
is explained by the telephone conver
sat ions incident to the giving of orders
before tlio opening of (lie market and
the handiing of inquiries which arise
from the opening prices on the New
York Slock Exchange.
Between noon and 1 Wall street frets
hungry, makes engagements and goes
to lunch. After that lias been arranged
the telephone operators pet a
rest
Having eaten a comfortable lun'h.
talked about tho morning's business
iind lighted a good cigar over a cup of
black coffee. Wall street's mind again
concentrates on the market, and the
telephone load immediately begins to
rise and soar upward, while the activity.
which usually marks the stock
market from until the closing at
is in progress. However, the afternoon
[>eak does not reach the morning
peak load.
After Wall street puts on its nat
ami goes home. leaving llie myriads
of clerks, stenographers and bookkeepers
to straighten out the tangles
ami clean up the mess which the day's
business has brought. There is liuie
time for telephone talk. Everybody
wants to e:et home, and in consequence
rhe number of calls declines sharply
up to <i. then lades :iway lor uie rcsr
of the ui^ht.? Wall Street Journal.
HOW NEW YORK HAS GROWN.
The Metropolis Absorbed Villages as I
Old as Itself !n 1893. 1
A metropolis jjrows up in two ways, i
At first it expands legitimately, adding'
furlong to furlons of growth. Then it!
leaps forward and seizes a l:irjre area !
overnight by act or legislature or parliament.
sweeping into its net a. score j
of villages and settlements. Then it'
proceeds to consolidate its position by ;
filling up the intervening spaces. In j
European cities they have an inner j
ring. which is the old city, and an j
outer ring, which may be anything, r
Xew Yor!;. Chicago. Boston. Seattle,
have their inner rings, which are the
legitimate city, and the outer rins, !
which came by the get-bis-quick meth- !
od. New York succumbed to the promoter's
fever in 189S. In that year the
city absorbed large areas of virgin soil
and a chain of independent villages, |
some of them nearly as old as Man- J
hattan itself. From the sound to the
AffonHn ctrofr-li fhp bnck- i
bone of Long Island and the lower
harbor to Staten Island, where the lo- j
cal tradition in spite of municipal fer
rles and promised tunnels has remained !
at its strongest.
Such frenzied expansion is the reason !
* 1~ *- ?2 r* f K/V r*/\n Oil Kll n} l? I
Wily LIIP iravcici ill lac ucuici ouuuiwa
of a great city will often come across ? j
city line which Is no longer the city j
line. As you near the old city line ]
from the heart of population the solid
blocks of apartroents and flats thin j
out There follow stretches of waste 1
lauu, market gardens, cemeteries. It ,
is across this zone between the old and I
the new city lines that the transit rail- |
ways throw their surface iines and ele- '
mt-prt "pYtpnsions/* and close behind .
them are the builders crisscrossintr the j
raw acres with their lines of "frame" j
and brick.?Simeon Strunsky In liar- ,
Iter's.
A Bottle Barometer.
Fill a bottle or tube with alcohol in j
which you have dissolved a piece of j
camphor. About one cubic inch of ]
camphor to half a glass of alcohol is
the right proportion. Cork the bottle
tightly and the barometer is ready for
use. If the weather is !<> be fair the
alcohol will remain clear. If the alcohol
is cloudy the weather will be rainy.
The higher the cioiniiucss rises in the
bottle the rainier the weather will be. j
Be careful to !? ? ;? the !>.>t:le tightly I
corked, so that t!u' a!? ?> );?1 and the '
camphor will not rvaporate.? Youth's j
Companion. j
Juvenile WondersAmerica
has products] three wonderful
boy calculators. "Marvelous (Jriffitli."
as he was called, could raise a
number to the sixth power in eleven
seconds. Truman Safford at the ace of
ten could multiply one row of fifteen
figures by another of eighteen in a
minute or less. The third was William j
James Siriis, who at fourteen went to
Harvard and astounded all of his instructors
by his profound grasp of
mathematical principles.?Boys' Life.
Evidence of Genius,
"He started life with a shoestring,
and now he has $1,000,000. Seems Incredible.
eh?"
"Not at all. I should consider that
a man who could got anyooay to imj
one shoestring was inevitably bound
to succeed."?Judge.
Entitled to Charge.
"A professional man is paid for what
be knows, not for what be does."
"Then that young lawyer ought to
get some tremendous fees."
"WhvV
"lie knows It all"?Louisville Coarier-Journal.
_ I
Al'".)hol and Pneumonia.
j The United States Public Health
Service brands strong drink as the
most efficient ally of pneumonia. It
l
declares that alcohol is the handmai
den of the disease which produces ten i
per cent of the deaths in the United 1
States. This is not exaggeration. "We j
have known for a long time that in- j
diligence in alcoholic liquors lowers 1
the individual vitality, and that ihe j
man who drinks is peculiarly susceptible
to pneumonia. The United States
Public Health Service is a conservative
body. It does not engage in alarmist
propaganda. In . ol'owing out the
line o its official duties it has "brought
forcefully to the general public a fact ;
which will bear endless repetition, j
The liberal and continuous user of al- J
i coholic drinks will do well to heed this |
j warning, particularly at this season !
of the year when the gruesome death j
i toil from pneumonia is being doubled, j
i
! j
| o!ifBs 0!a Seres, Stner Ksmsaies Won't ".72D;e
worst cases, no matter of how long standing,
1 ire cured bv the wonderful, old reliable Dr.
I - -tpr'p Antiseptic Healing Oil. It relieves
| i ^r.d lleals at thf sam'; time. 2.S:.5Cc. Sl.Oi
|
I Mr. Went-And-Cut-ii
| -Here's Mr. "Gets-h"
i
I The Plan Corn Cure That's as j
Sure as the Rising Sun.
! '
i
j "u-'ad to meat you!" says the rezor i
! to the corn. 'Til bleed for you,"' says !
! :he corn to the razor. Razors and i
i
j corns love each other. Corns love to i
"Why, O "Why, DM I Do It? <Gcts-It?
for Me After This?If i Liver
be cut, picked, gouged, salved, plas- j
tered and jerked out?the grow faster, j
Mr. and Mrs. i.Vfent-and-Cut-It realize I
it now?they use "-Gets-It" instead?J
it's the wonderful, simple corn-cure j
that never fails. Stops pain. You 1
apply it in 2 seconds, it dries at once, j
the corn is doomed. Nothing to stick j
to the stocking or press on the corn, j
It means good-night to plasters, salves,
diggers, razors and toe-bundling. You _ .
can wear smaller shoes. Your corns \
will come right off, "clean as a whis- j
tie.'' Never inflames healthy flesh, i ^
The world's biggest selling corn cure, j
"Gets-It" is sold by druggists every-j T
where. 25c a bottle, or sent direct by j T
E. Lawrence & Co., Chicago, 111. Sold j "
I pi
in Newberry and recommended a-s the j q
world's best corn remedy by Gilder * j X
Weeks, W. G. Mayes and P. E. Way. jIj
r
Takes th<
WHI(
One Way
You feel bad, take caloir
feel a heap worse. Go ho
and go to bed. Can't e
Vmi irnnr -Friar) rlc:
X V.'Ll 11(10^ JUUi ii iv/iiVAu>
sicker!! sickest!!!. Three
four days you drag ab<
before you feel like hustlii
IT IS
| Liv-ver
A su
We
a*
Glide
m * <
IN ew berry
S >
M
5 j?3l
g ^r,- ?RHEUA
/ / / /
M
Mothers
5 of the family from yout]
2 when you use this old a
| Slo
fa o
"i $ %
* Bruises?Shears
H Mothers: ''Keep a
M/
Price 25c., *
IIVMMHWWSME
tram riift'T?wBaMBBMWwcM?aaBaraK3awaMMMBiiii AM rjqv
QUAUTY SI
For All A
Preserve your up
from hot, penetrating, cj
damaging soakings when
< nr>
trom grease on your owr
the garage man. You ca
advantage, after two ye;
upholstering is in fine sh
STOP THAT LE
manufacture new coverii]
Just slip new covering ov
WRITE FC
M. I. Mc^
RACINI
5 Drive Out Malaria
And Build Up The System
ake the Old Standard GROVE'S
ASTELESS chill TONIC. You know
hat you are taking, as the formula is
rinted on every label, showing it is
on/1 Tfn? in a f o ef PCC friTTri
auu xiv/u iu
ie Quinine drives out malaiia, the
ro7 Guilds up the system. 50 cents
i rrn i
viLK-j
ni r
3 riace or
;h is your v
A
'at. nex
ck! % lax
or t,(ie
)ut you
ng. grip
PLEASANT TO T
lax 50c a
{AH oAnctms
I C CUIC A V/l wiaou|/U
guarantee Liv-v?
A T?1
r a W
Sc
(MKMKMXHMMMMH
""'"'L s
!
| Your cares in comfort- H I
ing the aches and pains M A
h to old age, are lessened w' ~M
ind trust-worthy remedy? *
9 M
an s 5 r
TiAnt S 1
\ ucL A il V W ?
latisrn?Neuralgia ?
bottle in year home" M
50c. 2nd ?1.00 g
smxmmmmhmhhmb
m
AT COVERS
utomobiles
bolstering and protect it
racking sun rays. From ?jgj
i it rains, cats and dogs,
i hands, or the hands of
n sell your car to better
ars service, because the A
i n r\A
Lafjc.
!AK in your top. We I
igs for tops for all cars. ^
er old bows. *
)R PRICES
1 T T T 7 n/-\
VVUI tu. j v
e, wis. I
f V '
One of a Kind.
Disgusted Cop (at crossing) ? Say.
you're a peacb of a driver! If you was
crossin' the alkali desert you'd run into
a hydrant.?New York Times.
*
Unless yon bear with the faults of a
i fripnd v?>ti betrav vour own.?Svrus.
AY l!
urx^ x i
Calomel j
VAY? 1
another Way J
ou feel bad, take Liv-ver- ||
at nigrht. Feel better 1
t morning Take Liv-ver
w ? J
daily in small doses 'and A
more you take the better
feel. No sickness, no I
>ing; "feel fine as silk." l
AKE
i
bottle
<
ition \
r-lax
eeks J
JU ill VsCLi vrima. j

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