OCR Interpretation


The herald and news. (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, April 04, 1916, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063758/1916-04-04/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for Six

SOl'THERN KAIL WAY >VILL
AID AO.RHTLTIRAL COLLEGES
"Washington, March 29.?As a perpetual
memorial to the great ijiterest
Southern farming manifested by
j. i i ~ ^ x i J ~ ?
xae iaie i resiuem r uuej, ritsiueiu
Harrison, of Southern Railway company
lias arranged to give $1,000 each
to the State agricultural colleges in
Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina,
Geofgia. Florida. Alabama, Mississippi,
Kentucky and Tennessee, to
be do.- mated "Southern Railway Loan
Fund: William Wilson Finlev Founrianr.n."
Loans from the fund in each
-State are to be made by the college
??.itr>ormes to worthy students in such
yrb.y the authorities of each college
may determine, subject only to
the restriction that the students receiving:
the benefits shall be from
counties traversed by the lines o-.
Southern Railway company or its associated
companies.
This permanent loan fund will take
tne place of the one-year Southern
Railway scholarship provided by f\3r.
Fmley which will expire with close of
tne present school year.
SOUTHERN RAILWAY'S STATE
MEM SHOWING RECEIPTS AND
EXPENDITURES IX THE SOUTH
Washington. March 30.?During
February. 1916. Southern Railway
company disbursed for labor, material,
supplies, and other purposes $4,221,402
of which $3,674,996 or ST.06 per
cent, was paid to individuals and industries
located in the South. This
amount represents more than 93 per
cent, of the moneys paid to the company
for transportation by those located
on the lines, according to figures
enounced today by Comptroller A. H.
Plant, showing the results of operation
of the company for the month o.'
February, 1916, and for the period of
'ght months ended February 29, 1916,
compared with the same month and
period in 1915 and 1914. exclusive of
jnterest. rentals and other income
charges. The comparison with 1914
.1 ^ ? iVkrt ?'/vn ci-v?> fKof In 1 QT "
ij'itUt; xor l lie icaoyu iuuv iu
c effect of the business 'depression
vas reflected through the revenues o?
trie company.
Gross revenue, February, 1916? $5t17,162.
an increase compared with
1915 of $1,009,755 or 21.87 per cent and
increase as compared with 1914 o.
$317,1 55 or 5.97 per cent.
Operating expenses, taxes and urir-olle
rib'e railway revenue. February.
$1.045.9S1. an increase as ccmpared
wi.h 1915 of $147,739.20 or 3.70
;i;er cent an<l a decrease as compared
1914 of $365,737 or 8.29 per
cent.
0
In addition to the foregoing operating
N.A;ienses. the company spent in
February, 1916 lor improvements to
its roadway and structures, $724,515.59
3.s against $764,545.37, during Februa:a.ry,
1915. and $173,2S2.3S during Feb'
nary, 1914.
Corresponding results for the eight
sionths periods are as follows:
Gross revenue this year $45,591,977,
an increase compared with 1915 of
$3,555,991 or 8.40 per cent and a decrease
as compared with 1914 o? $2,439.03S
or 5.08 per cent.
Operating expenses, taxes and uncollectible
railway revenues this year
-*32,240,687, a decrease as comp'ared
^itli 1915 a" $1,425,629 or 4.23 per
oent. and as compared with 1914 of
i't -oo OT-A n.f 1/1 Q- nop
V/l A V.Utf yvi VVUV*
In addition to the foregoing operating
expenses, the company spent during
the eight months this year for improvements
to its roadway and structures,
$5,189,799.03, as against $6,208,681.14
during the same period in
1915 and $1,853,561.05 during the same
period in 1914.
FRANCIS J. PELZER, PIONEER
COTTON MANUFACTURER, DIES
Charleston, March 31.?Francis J.
"^lzer, probably the richest man in
-South Carolina, died here this afternoon.
Had he lived until April 9 he
Ttfould have been 90 years of age. having
been born in Charleston, lApril 9,
1826.
He is survived by three sons and
two daughters.
Funeral arrangements have not
i-been completed.
3Ir. Pelzer was among the first
cgraat business men of the State to
^rSdpate actively in the phosphate
aim cotton mill industries in the State.
~Fos ?sr\er 50 years he was a prominent
120troii factor of Charleston.
He wns presided of the Pelzer-Rogfers
company operating a string oi* cot".ton
mills in upper South Carolina.
Mr. Pelzer was a modest although
-pablic spirited citizen. His ambition
did not include holding public office
"tut lie was alderman during the administration
?; of Mayors Wagner and
Smythe. For many years he has not
actively engaged in his great business
interests.
LEVER COTTON SEED
BILL PASSES HOUSE
j
i
Would Authorize Census I)ire"tor to
Collect and Publish Monthly
Statistics.
I
Washington, March 30.?The Lever
bill authorizing the census director to
collect and publish monthly statistics
of cotton seed and cotton seed products
! was passed by the house, after an all
day debate, and now will go to the
! senate.
Chairman Helm, of the census com
- ? ^ ? 4- V> A TAn 1 /J rtO 1 1
IUltlCG IiyilCC UUU IXC "vuiu vau
up r.cxt week the Heflin bill, directing
the bnrciiu to collect and publish statistics
oi" cotton consumed in the manufacture
of explosves during 1915 and
I
quarterly thereafter.
*
i In reportng the Lever bill, Representative
Aswell of Louisiana, said
it was drafted after a conference with
the census director and that it would
afford an opportunity of making free
1 application of the law of supply and
; o'-mand.
"The census bureau now provides!
I lor collection of statistics from all
! the oil mills regarding the quantityj
| of cotton seed crushed and linters ob-:
! cahied." he said. "This bill, however, j
j provides for amplification of these ,
| statistics and makes mandatory the
| publishing of them at stated periods.;
Flic additional expense probably will
be about $10,000. with less annually 1
after the first year.'' j
| TALK OF NEW COUNTY
HEARD AT FORT MILL;
.
I |
j Meeting Held at Which Committee
Comes From Rock Hill for
i
Discussion. !
. |
The State. j
Fort iMill, March 28.?There was a'
meeting here yesterday in the rooms
of the Savings bank of the citizens of
the town in conference with a committee
(from Rock Hill, consisting of Ira
B. Dunlap, C. L. Cobb, W. B. Wilson,
Jr., and J. W. Marshall, with reference
to the formation of a new county of
which Rock Hill will probably be the
county seat if the proposition goes
through. The new county will take
in parts of York. Chester ana Lancaster
counties, included in which are 13
mills, the two plants of the Southern
Power company anxl a large number of
ether manufacturing ififlustries. PeJ
tition blanks were le> t with W. B.
! Meacham, president of the Savings
bank, and they are being freely signed.
i APPROPRIATION FOR CEDAR
j SPRINGS IS "BALLED UP'
| The Record.
' The appropriation of .$100,000 for repairs
at the -State Institute for the
Deaf, Dumb and Blind at Cedar Spring
| in Spartanburg county, was ''balled
5 up" in the appropriation bill and Atomey
General Peeples has ruled that
it will take a court order to pay out
the appropriation. Consequently Solicitor
A. E. Hill, o.' Spartanburg, representing
Supt. Cs. F. Walker, of the
Cedar Springs institute, is bringing
mandamus proceedings against Comptroller
General Sawyer in the supreme
court to compel the payment of this
appropriation. The attorney general
will represent the comptroller general
in the matter.
It; appears that the senate amendrapnt
to this item in the appropriation
bill was agreed to by the house,
through adoption of the free conference
committee report, but the amendment
does not appear in the draft of
I the appropriation bill.
The $10,000 appropriation whi?h
ttifc general assembly thought it was
makiug was for repairs to the main
ouikiing at Cedar Springs.
The appropriation of $100,OOu xor
repairs at the State Hoeuital for the
irsane also got "balled up'* in the
appropriation bill and it took a ruling
of ?\e supreme court to clear up the
legality of this appropriation and
nu?kc :f available.
Whenever You NeeU a General Tool:
Take Grove's
The Old Standard Grove's Tasteless
chill Tonic is equally valuable as a
General Tonic because it contains the
" * i * ? I /riTTTXTTXTW
wen Known conic propertiesui^uhnx^xc
and IRON. It acts on the Liver, Drives
out Malaria, Enriches the Blood ana
i Builds up the Whole System. 50 cents.
Malaria or GHills & Fever
j Proscription No. 666 it prepared especially
; for MALARIA or CHILLS & FEVER.
| Five or six doses will break any case, and
| if taken then at a tonic the Fever will not
i return. It actt on the liver better than
! Calomel ?nd does not gripe or sicken. 25c
! CHICHESTER S PILLS
' t,ie diamond it band. /
Lsdltitl A?k youpDriiKlntfor A\
! i\ ti~AM C'hl-chea-ter a Diamond Tlrand^#V\
in Kfd and Oold meta'.lic^^^V
! 2V ?^3 boxes, scaled with Blue Ribbon. \y
'Si Take no other. Buy of your ?
"/ - ijf Drucclnt. Ask forCHI-CIIES-TER S
Jj? DIAMOND JtRAND PILLS, for 85
years known as Best, Safest, Always Reliable
^?-r SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE
; THE HEsRALD AND NEW3 ONE
j YEAR FOR ONLY $1.50.
' I
Why the English Sparrow is
Undesirable.
Florence Schumpert.
English sparrows are the most unde|
sirable of all birds. The\ are more
! abundant than any other bird. People
! have killed out other birds hut they
| istill let the English sparrow run at
large. In fact they can't kill them
'like other birds; they can only trap <
them.
The English, sparrow destroys gardens.
He is almost as bad as a kill- <
ing frost in a garden. He eats the 1
small plants as soon as they appear i
above ground. When the flowers appear
on the pants he pulls them off. In- ;
stead of eating worms and bugs he 1
eats the vegetables. <
Sparrows annoy, fight and run off
use.'ul birds. Sometimes in the nest- 1
ins season, the sparrow will bother the t
nests and dirve off the birds. They 3
drive off bluebirds, house cten's sad ;
swallows by destroying their eggs and
young and by taking possession of i
their nesting places. ?
They breed mites, lice and many oth- *
er kinds of vermin. They build nests 1
of straw and feathers which are good (
breeding places for mites and lice. ?
They put their nests under fite -cares I
of the liouse and mites may get c
through into the house. They also 1
may start mites among chickens by
building their nests under the ea.es
of the lien' liouse. i
t
The English sparrow destroys cherries,
grapes, pears, peaches, bulbs and
ofiwers of cultivated trees, shrubs and
vines. 1
Not a single State in the union has
enacted a law by which the English I
sparrow may be protected; but all are 1
beginning to make efforts to protect i
other more useful birds by driving out ^
the sparrow. <
?
How to Attract Birds Around Our !
Home.
! Herman Dickert.
i
/We want birds around us because
. of their songs, their help in gardening
' and i or their destruction of harmful
I
: insects.
j If birds stay around us tliey, of
: course, expect us to board them "free
of charge" for the work th?v do. In
i . *
; summer thev can get all the wild fruit
! !
j that they want and will not bother the
, orchard. All they want in summer is j
! a pool of fresli water to drink and to
bathe in. In winter when food is
scarce the birds look for iiood around
the houses. If you want to feed the
I birds you can take a boxt open one
side of it, set it in a tree o** on a pole
and put food in it. Another way is to
i take a narrow box about two inches
J wide and a foot long, bore holes in the
side and put food in the box. Make a
platform for the birds to stand on.
All over the country people are
| building nesting boxes for the birds,
j Some are like hotels, others are boxes |
I with three corners open, others are
; gourds with holes bored in them. Some '
. are tin cans with holes in them, set
, on poles in shady places.
' To keep squirrels^ cats, weasels and
i other animals that kill birds away, put'
, a niece or" tin around the tree a foot
long and they cannot climb the tree, j
Do not build platforms on the boxes j
because English sparrows will 'both-;
er the other birds and run them away.'
;?e should kill the English sparrow be- J
cause they eat garden seed and plants.'
They also run pretty birds away.
<$> <g>
| <*> DO YOU XSOW
! <?- < >
T
<?> There is no Federal institu- -'i
& t!on ;n the continental United <?> |
States for the reception and
care of lepers? <?
4' <$>
Plague is a disease of rodeiits
?
j $ <S>
|^' Malaria is spread by a spe- $ |
)<?' cial mosquito? '?>,
! <r <$ |
House screening is a good <f j
disease preventive? j
^ |
Fingers, flies and food spread <r ,
<? tvphoid fever?
a 1
v v j
Pellegra may be prevnted or <?> ,
cured by proper diet? <s <
-y i
V The United States Public <S>
J
<?- Health Service believes that ^ J
<s> ahe common towel spreads tra- <?> j
choma. a disease of the eyes? & i
* ? _ * i
Children from sanitary $<?>
homes advance more rapidly
<$> in school than those from dirty <? .
premises?
<$> <5>
? <$> <?> <?> <S> <?> ^ <?> <$><?> <?<?'<$ <S>
To Drive Out Malaria
And Build Up The System
Take the Old Standard GROVE'S
TASTELESS chill TONIC. You know
What you are taking, as the formula is
printed on every label, showing it :s
Quinine and Iron in a tasteless form. '
The Quinine drives out mala: la, the!
Irov builds up the system. 50 cents !
GOVERSOR MANNING SIOS f
THE .NEW TEXTILE BILLS
The Record.
Governor Manning has signed the
act amending the act known as the 60liour
law, and also the act providing
for weekly pay rolls in cotton mills.
In commenting on the matter, the governor
said: 1
"During the past year I liu.e had
numerous complaints of the violation
or the 6u-liour law, letters reaching
this office from cotton mill employes
in various parts of the State. These
i.ut.s ?crc leened to the Commissioner
of Agriculture, Commerce and
Industries for investigation and prose i;t:on
1?\ him through his inspectors.
The commissioner advised that the old
aw was not specific enough to afford
:he operatives any protection in the
natter of hours of labor, and that it
as virtually a dead letter.
""After a careful consideration of the
lew act, carefully considering the arguments
urged against its approval
md after a full coherence with Hon.
?. J. Watson, commissioner of agriculture,
commerce and industries, who
?-U f t It rt Tifltf- nAt it
IU> l.NUU mat tut v> <.4 V/ c yi IAA iiiuuw , I
)ossib!e to protect the operatives with-1
)ut working any hardships on the employer.
I decided to sign the act. The
commissioner states that, in his opinon.
failure to approve this act would
r.e;m that it would be a waste of time,
iiieigy and money to endeavor to remit!
y overtime abuses, and that all thei*
efforts in that direction would be
worthless.
"The weekly pay roll act is, in my
judgment a wise one and is calculated
;o aid the operatives, in reaching the
point where he may live on a cash
basis, without doing any injury to the
employer.''
Get the Range ol
Smoking Satisfaction
I
A FY, J i
/~V JUU.il uuiiiaiu tigaitnc
has all the vim, vigor and dash
of Uncle Sam's fighting men.
That's why the American
Army is an army of "Bull" I
Durham smokers. For a virile,
lively, manly smoke, "roll your
own" with "Bull" Durham.
i
GENUINE
Bull
Durham
SMOKING TOBACCO
"Bull" Durham is the mildest
of all cigarette tobaccos. Its
unique aroma and distinctive
mellow-sweet flavor is duplicated
by no other tobacco.
It has been the great American
smoke for three generations.
Learn to "roll your own**
with "Bull" Durham?you
can do it with a little practice
?and learn new smoke enjoyment.
^At ^
U / IJi; A;J KcKg ' ? y
THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY
Incorporated
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Xouoe lS Hereby given mat all per-!
sens holding claims against the estate1
of Mrs. Mary E. Counts, deceased, will
present the same aulv attested o he,
i
undersigned on or Deiore tne iui.a aay.
of April, 191G. and all persons indebted
to said estate will make payment
to the undersigned, as executor of said
deceased.
C. H. COUNTS,
Executor, Mrs. Mary E. 'Counts, deceased.
C-KMtltaw.
THE HERALD AND NEWS ONE
YEAR FOR ONLY $1.50.
HARLEY-DAVIDSON
THE WORLD'S
A few second hand Motorcy<
your old Motorcycle and get a
Harley-Davidson on inscallmer
ride. *
H. O. STONI
Newberry, i
) Rising Sui
4 SELF-RISING AND RE/
I
ji
^ tejoc
Made of choicest Red Wir
4 and prepared according to
ity that has made the old 1
ville, Tenn., nationally fai
Say RISING SUN i
3 grocer. You'll be
A1W CTATF
BromptJ
WE GUARA
GRIGS1
Liv - Vei
To cleanse the system of
To restore healthy actio
Liver and Ki
To assist in relieving constif
tude of ills the human i
If you are not entirely satisf
we will cheerfully refu
In the Spring your system nee
?~ ?- /\m ???rtmioQa '
us yum nuuac vx. ^iciuiov.o?
will beat LIV-VER-LAX in t<
and in keeping you hardy an
Gilder &
SOITHERX ARRANGING FOR I-ixix
CONFEDERATE REUNION tlire.
ties
Birmingham, Ala., March ? >.?Ar- \ t,e 1
ran.$,ements i.or handling the thou- ?vpe
>ands of visitors who will be in Bir- kanc
n ;pgham for the annual reunion ol ta^ nen
f.'nited 'Confederate veterans May 16, turn
17. 18, with the same dispatch 'hat lnec^
normal travel is handled through the I aS!?u
j
I firm in o-Vi n m Tprmin^l StatiOU iiave |
been made by Southern railway as tlie j
result of a meeting of representatives: ?~
of the passenger an<l operating de-jCar!
partments at which & was decided to j f'r
form for this occasion a special cr- J ^or *
gauization similar to that which ac- J eran
complislied such splendid results i.'or j sen
the Southern at former reunions. !
j the
It is expected'that the attedance at sion
the reunion will easily reach 75,000.
persons and the conference was hold j
in order to perfect nlans for the South-! Becai
c... . . , . 1 TIVS
mi s part in efficiently moving this, QUinj
iyrge body of people and out of
'ivi r^iu
MOTORCYCLES
BEST
:les cheap. Trade in *1
new one. Buy a new I
its and pay while you f
i, Dealer.
> c.
n Flour }
lDY prepared. J
I r
I \>
iter Wheat, ground | |
the superior qual- b
EtED MILL, Nash- 4
mOUS. 1
?
o any good Jj
' pleased. I ?
c ^
-engravers
?Bates ia
2Wmfiflone
Novice1
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
mmmtm
.NTEE
BY'S
*-Lax
r poisonous toxins,
n of the bowels,
dneys.
>ation and the multifamily
is he r to.
ied with the results,
md your money,
ds cleansing the same
rhereis nothing that
jning up your system,
r} Vio Irk
u iiaiu?
Weeks,
lingham within the short space of ^
s days. Special temporary faciliand
ample police protection wi!l
irovided, and a large number of
:rt passenger men will be on
i to assist the veterans and their
d? in making arrangemnts for retrip.
while special operating and
n'ndl fnr/'Oc u-ill ho tft
id iiV.ai iVI n *4* V V
r j he prompt movement of trains.
2etings of this character are al5
held by the Southern in ad?a.*v^e
irge occasions so that no feat are
be overlooked in moving the ex:ra
ic it is called upon to handle, and
he Birmingham reunion of the vet,s
there will be brought to the
ice of the visitors the full benefit
ie experience gained in handling
crowds on other similar occa5.
Outahje That Does Not Affect The Head
:se of its tonic and laxative effect, JLAXA.
BROMO QUININE is better than ordinary
ne and does not cai?se nervousness nor
ng in head. Kememher the mil name and
'.jf t:w c. W. G? VE. 25c

xml | txt