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The herald and news. (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, May 05, 1916, Image 1

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VOLUME L1IL, KUMBEB &> DEWBERRY, S. C? FRIDAY, MAY :>, 1916. jf| TWICE 1 WEEK, $U0 A YEAR.
Petition State <
For Campaig
nn ? mn 117 ft ItPIIAflPP TA
MAIL WAKUIUUM IU
BE IN THE CAMPAIGN
*
MEETING OF STATE WAREHOUSE
ASSOCIATION WEDNESDAY
Request of State Convention Made?
McLaurin Will Run for Lieutenant
Governor, if Necessary.
Columbia, May 3?At a largely attended
meeting of the South Carolina
Mlarehouse association, held in ' the
fho Warehouse com
VWVCO VI VV WV_..
mission today, pursuant to the call
recently issued by President J. Arthur
Banks, it was unanimously expressed
as the sentiment of the meeting
that there should be a campaign
this summer in the interest of the
system, and its further enlargement
and development, and that the Statej
warehouse commissioner, Senator
Jno. L. McLaurin, was the proper
maa to make it. The action of the association
was embodied in a resolution
introduced hy Hon. E. W. Dabbs,
former president of the State Farmers
union, requesting the State Dem
ocratic convention, which meets next
f Wednesday, to grant Senator McLaurin
an hour's time at each of the regular
campaign meetings this summer.
The resolution--was signed by those
present,.and will be formally pre-'
seated as a memorial to the State
convention. , i .
President J. Arthur Banks called
the meeting to order promptly at 2:30
o'ciock. In a ringing address he reviewed
the State warehouse system,
beginning with the efforts of Senator
McLaurin for the passage of the
law, and telling, from personal
knowledge, as well as close observait
Vod Vtopn firmlv establish- !
tlVAii, uv n aw uuv* vvvm ^
ed in the money centrec and the \
great benefit which it had been to
the people not only of South Carolina,1
Obut of the entire South, in a time ci i
financial depression, when money
> was not to be had at any price, be-'
cause the Southern banks did not
it to lend. He told of the op^^position
which it had encountered at
every step. '*It has got the strongest,
shrewdest, best-organized eaemies
of anything in this State," he said, j
There has been a struggle against it'
from its inception, and there is still
a struggle, and if you don't get to
-gether a;:d organize your forces and
stand together behind some man of
devotion and zeal and ability, they j
will finally whip you to death. And
that is the reason I called this meet-;
ing together?for the purpose of\get-j
ting together oa a campaign of edu-;
cation, so that the people of every
State may know what the warehouse
system is, and know what it means,
and know its possibilities of good for
the whole -South. When the people j
once know it, it will sever die, be- j
cause it is sound?sound absolutely.
Nobody has ever been able to pick a
flaw in it."
Hon. W. tA. Siuckey of BishoiJville
said that he felt the time had come
to present a bold front, and simply
declare to the public what it was i
proposed to do. This was a nonpartisan
body, he said, and a cam- *
paign of education was needed. He
moved that a campaign be started today
in -behalf of the State warehouse,
to agitate and discuss it before the '
people of South Carolina, regardless j'
-of factional politics. "In . an issue |'
^ 3&e this we should be great enough 11
to rise above factionalism, and we !
?toul^see to it that our (members of '
4?re general assembly are !
straight State warehouse men?men <
whose speech, when they say so, 1
comes not -only from their mouths, '
.'but from the ftbuadaace of their 1
fcAarta." 1
^"Wc are all tefaiud Mr. McLaurin,"
icaid Mr. Edward B. Rembert of Sum:- j
ter county, 14 aad We would like to i
| iiear froaj Jiiaa* and let fcim tell us i
wfcat lie US to -do to further *
this great cause * |
iS-enator McLaarta said' in part, t?s <
Convention
\n of Education
| remarks being frequeutly interrupted
by enthusiaistic applause:
In my annual report to the general
I
assembly 1 referred to the persistent
fight made against the State Warelicuse
System its business success
an admitted fact wherever operated,
j the opposition united in an endeavor
| to defeat my re-election, by centreing
| their strength behind a cotton buyer.
The attempt to draw factional lines;,
be it said to the everlasting credit
oi" the legislature, proved a miserable
failure. Then they tried the subtle
plan of cutting the appropriation,
ai:d not permitting the use of the revenue
derived from the system for its
further development. Mait-oacKea
young lawyers were the mouth-piece
of the opposition, but the agricultural
committee rallied the business and
farming element, and took the legisj
lation away from the ways and means
and judiciary committees, thereby de!
feating their plan.
Human greed is a powerful incenj
tive, and interests preying upoa the
| producer will ever fight any change
which interferes with middle-mea's
profits. As usual, the big interests
combined. I have never seen such a
lobby as they had here to pre vest a
licensed -grader's bill and insurance
legislation.
These people have the power of
money behind them. >They control
the big daily papers, and act as a
unit.
We are not waging war on individuals.
iWe are fighting to reform an
unjust economic system; yet the attack
is centred on me personally.
While we are not responsible for insurance
legislation, yet the State sys- j
tem must bear the burden of the
fight, and assume the task of de^
31 JL I
ieiiamg 11.
It is a business question, not politi- j
cal nor class, and I pity the man
whose contracted soul does r.ot consider
it of greater importance to
South Carolina, than his individual
calling, or the particular political
facton to which he belongs. The coming
campaign will revolve around the
State warehouse system, and it is our
duty to let the people know who is
serving them, to what end, and for
whose benefit.
In the insurance matter, 1 advo- j
cate an amendment to the warehouse
law permitting the commissioner, under
proper restrictions, to carry a !
portico of the risk and re-insure the ,
T inr-i mrtnr rlrvinp' * T .hnVA I
uaiautC| wo x uiu uv?? ^ wA ~ j
paid out over fifty thousand dollars i
in premiums, and had less than j
twelve hundred dollars of losses. By !
a proper distribution of risks, wej
carry State cotton, and in a few years |
have a reserve fund sufficient to
make the cost of insurance almost'
nominal.
The con-spiracy in Columbia which .
fomented the withdrawal of the
companies should be fully exposed,!
aud can be, from the records in my J
hands. The federal government reg- j
ulates interest rates, banks, railroads .
and telegrraph companies, and if it'
>><? nnwpp tr> romnel the in
?T - - I
surance companies to do business in
Scuth Carolina, or quit doing busi-j
:.ess in the United States, then we ,
had better get some new members
of congress.
The State warehouse is not the so- ^
lution, it is only, the means. We must j
have sufficient warehouse room to
carry the surplus in each county. 'The?
county should be the unit ia financing
and marketing the crop, with all
the county houses federated !nto a
State-wide system. Little can be ac- j
complished in marketing until the
farmers are aroused to the necessity
>f co-operation. We axe now the easy .
prey of unscrupulous money lenders,
Insurance trust, fertilizer trust, ex*
porters, and all of the other parasites j
that grow fat on the manipulation of
farm products.
The Lord helps those who help'
hemsehes. fW% have the foundation
in the State warehouse for the organization
of farm insurance, rural 1
credit unions, and a farmer's hank
operating under the federal reserve
system. We must have licensed grad-1
3rs and force the buyers to purchase
I"
\U4
\<
The only thing to
erate him for a minute,
nity. He is the origina
| never so happy as when
as he does. If allowed
the best proposition on <
if he converts enough pi
dead stop. After havin
ing can be done for the
i "Town Knocker" is to h
infectious that it has be
PLE. KICK THE KN<
from State warhouses upon standard
grades.
The .necessary educational cami-aign
cannot be made through daily
newspapers, because they are owned
by tho?e whose interests are antagonistic
to us. I agree with you that
we must make an educational campaign,
and as you designate me, 1
cheerfully assume the burden and
will do the best I can.
Let us go forward, sustained by
faith in God and trust in the good
people of South Carolina.
I want nothing personally. This
work lifts me above sordid political
ambition. Don't worry about my reward.
I will get more out of it tha:i
office holds. I will receive that enlargement
of life which comes to
every one who unselfishly serves his
fellowman. All the politicians in
^ Arc 4-A
iSiOUiii ua.ruuna. are pwrciicoo m uv?/
me this. It is God's gift.
The State warehouse system is
worth fighting for. It is the first distinct
attempt .by this government to
aid the creators of all wealth, by utilizing
the public credit in their ber
half. State receipts are discounted
by member banks at three per cent.,
and tlie farmer gets the money at
six. His cotton is in the form .of a
negotiable security, like the bond of
a corporation. This means equal pHvileges.
The next step is a system of .
credit based on land. It is easier and!
simpler than one based on cotton.
Elect the right legislature, and a gov"
- - J> T Sit I
ernor m sympamy, ana i win ww
ready a rural credit measure as basyi
to work as the State warehouse law.'
There is a studied attempt to prevent
information from reaching the
people. Every effort has been' made
to poison the publio mind and destroy
confidence in me. They allege that
the whole thing is politics. I tried
to go before the people fourteen j
years ago, and the politicians chang-1
ed the party rules to shut me out.
The intervening time has been one
Df preparation.
After being re-elected last winter, j
I asked the legislature to pijt this of-^
1 r
Jt
"THE TOWN KNOCKER"
do with the "Town Knocker"
and he spreads like an epiden
1 "Calamity Howler" and "B
he can persuade other people
to "get the floor," he will kno
sarth. He is against every fc
jople to HIS way of thinking,
g KILLED everything, he glo
town. It is doomed. The 01
ead him for the cemetery. E
en known to spread among sc
DCKER OUT.
in the primary. It refused, so
i we will give the people a chance; any1
way. Unless I have the backing of
j the people, there is no use in expending
my eiergv. wasting my time.
| and disbursing my income.
j A campaign of education is an absolute
necessity.
I cannot go before the people, u u
1-1 ? ?n1ao nnloto n far
I UCi lliC I Ul^O, UUI^/UO a VUiiv**v*wvv J.W*
! an office. To be a candidate for a
j lucrative office would weaken me.
! and do incalculable harm to the
I cause. I will therefore announce for
j lieutenant governor?an office no
j grown man wants and a live one
| would not have. The test will not be
I my election , but the legislature.
I have no candidate for governor,
and do not intend to defend or atj
tack any man in the race, unless in
defense of the system. I have no
! friends to serve nor enemies to punish
I.
j :It is principles, not men, tliat will
j control my action, and I shall discuss j
principles, and ask the people to j
study closely the *priacipies advo-|
cated by the various candidates. 1 j
will do this, no matter whom it helps '
j or hurts. I
I want results.
The source of wealth is land. It is j
folly to talk about the sacredness of
capital, without considering first the i
sacredness of labor and land. You
. mast start at the source, and make it
I possible for the man- who labors on
ith&t to live in peace and com
1 fort 'You must remove burdens which
keep him In constant fear of the preae6t
and <kmtxt of the future. He must
have some certainty in the struggle
to overcome odds that are against
him. We.are compelled to pay too
great a proportion of our earnings
for the prosperity of the few, and we
cannot much longer continue the un
equal struggle. We are in a majority
-^why not take tUe reins of government
fro? the hands of spoilsmen,
and see to it that there is equality of
opportunity for all white men, inso-l
{GOOO^I
I^p,'
/.
' is to kick him out. Tollic
all over the commu
J - t Til r\ >? TT _
ira-oi-iii-umen. ne is
to think the same way
ck the pins from under
irm of improvement, and
the town will come to a
ries in the fact that nothily
thing to do with the
[is habit of knocking is so
>me of the BEST PEOI
far as rights, privileges and opportunities
are concerned?
It is time the real wealth producers
of South Carolina took charge of
' this government from top to bottom. [
' This war has added a new crop of j
multi-millionaires to the already ov- j
er-abundant supply. These vast monied
interests, unless checked, will so
; enthrone themselves in- power that
i nothing short of revolution will re- !
I
lieve the toilers. These interests
i want factional strife, and will ust
, every effort to promote it, so that vot-.
| ers will forget economic questions af- i
; fecting their daily existence. 1
| These economic issues are the only
?things worth while. This govern- s
I mon.+ rviQTj- v>a r*f 4-he? npnnlp anfi 'T?v the <
1^ " ?
j people, but it is not for the people, it 1
I is for the few at the expense of the 1
(many. <
Individually we are powerless to J
make successful opposition to capi- _
tal acting as a unit. We can only do
so through a political mechanism,
which will transmute the will of the
people into the law of the land. Party
jand factional strife only divides our
; forces and enables the privileged few .
to thrive at the expense of the de- .
spoiled many.
?
i It takes no special effort on the 2
part of the few. The control of money r
and credit is the basis, while the j
common soul of greed everywhere
furnishes the impulse. It Is a pirate *
game we are up against Get something
for nothing out of the people
individually. Through legislation, ^
they have the congressional "pork c
barrel," while bond issues and useless g
appropriations enable them to pillage
State, counties and municipalities. 3
'Then, if any public man- dares voice fi
a protest, if he cannot be seduced by
flattery or bought like dog meat, they
crush him with slander and" ruin him
politically. The satanic cleverness
with wtiicb this is done is beyond be
i Y
The resolution introduced by Mf. |h
i 7
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 5.) h
POM ARIA GRADED SCHOOL
CLOSES TUESDAY, MAY ?
The Pomaria graded school taught
the past session by Mr. Ben M. Setzler
ar.d 'Miss Louise Richardson will
close next Tuesdav and there will he
dn interesting program rendered by
the pupils in the beautiful auditorium
of the handsome school building. The
school has had a very successful session
under the able direction of the
t'.vo very efficient teacners and r le
program to be rendered l y the pupi.'s
will be enjoyed by a large audience.
The exercises will begin at 8 o'clock
p. m.
Primary Department
Song?"Glad Welcome to All''?Pri-^
mary Grade.
Welcome"?Seven Little IChildrc*.
"Spring Opinions"?James Aull.
"Forbearance"?Sara Setzler, Frances
Hentz, and Willie Mae Stone.
"iVacation's Coming"?iLucile Stone.
Song?"The Quarrel"?Beaman Pinner.
and Mabl - Setzler.
"I'm a Man"?James Aull, Rebecca
Setzler and Estelie Boland.
<4In School and Out"-^Beaman
Pinner.
"A Little Bird Tells"?Clytie Hentz.
"Vacation Pun"?Six Girls, Six
Boys.
"Keeping Holiday"?Nellye Rafc.
Seybt. .
"Flower Driir?Nine Girls.
Song?"Vacation Glee" ?Primary
Grades.
"That Calf'?^Rebecca Setzler.
"Tom's Practical Joke"?Mattie j
Koon, Willie Livingston and J. C?
Auii. ' ?
"Lazy Sue"?Willie Mae Stone.
"Hustle and Grin"?Chris Koon.
"Meeting of "the dairies"?Seren '
Girls. _ ?
Song?"Home Sweet Home"?
Mable Setzler, Beaman Pinner, Henry
Counts, and Louise Graham*
High School Department
Music?Eloise Hipp.
Efesay?"Spring Time" ?? Jbhnnie
Koon.
Recitation?"The Railroad Crossin.
, -Claudia Sheely.
Music?William Aull.
Essay?"Union"?^Gus Johnson.
Recitation?"i m uetting >ioo bis
to Be Kissed"?Marian Setzler.
Music?iV'iary Hentz.
E-ssay?"Habits"?Richard Hipp.
"Salutatory and Class History"?
Ernest Kinard.
Music?Marian Setzler and Eloise
Hipp.
".Class Will and Prophecy"?Felicia
Koon.
"Valedictory"?Eloise .Hipp.
Music?Marian Setzler.
TflE MEETING POSTPONED
KIDGrE SPRISG SCHOOL
The teachers of the Ridge Spring
school had announced a meeting at
the school house in the interest of
the school and for the purpose of
irouskg the people to be held on May
> It has been postponed. Several gentlemen
had been invited to make short
:alks on education. The correspondsnt
for the Observer stated that the
neeting would be had on May 4. The
iditor of The 'Heraid and News saw
the teachers on Monday afternoon
md it was decided to call off the
neeting for this week inasmuch as
here had been some confusion as to
be time, and we promised to tell the
)bserver of the change and ask that
t be corrected. 'This we did. There
s to be an entertainment at the
chool on Saturday evening May 13
ind it was decided to have the gentlenen
who had been invited to make
oVtro o af ffriafr ttmp flnrf hpln
?01ZV0 wuiv MW ?? ? ?
intertain the people.
Woman's Missionary (Society.
At tke last meeting of the Roman's
rlissionary society of St. Matthews
hurch it was decided to meet the 3rd
Sunday of each month instead of the
irst. The members are requested to
leet the third Sunday instead of the
:rst
Mrs. Minnie U Caldwell,
President.
President Harms Will Preach.
Rev. J. H. Harms, president of New
erry college will preach at St. Stepen'?
Lutheran church Sunday, May
th. All are ur^efl to come out to
ear Dr. Harms."?Lexington News.

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