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The herald and news. (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, June 02, 1916, Image 7

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Bp CAPTAIN OF I
KB *A Canadian by IJirtli, as a Koy He J
Came to the States and JJecanie
the World's Misrlitiest Power
lit the Railroad Deveiop
cient World.
St. Paul. .Minn., .May 29.?James J.
Hill, railroad builder, capitalist and
most widely known figure of the
H i Northwest, died at his Summit aveR
nue residence at 9:30 o'clock this
morning c.s the result of an affection
due to bowel trouble, aged 77 years.
B . ' James J. Hill discovered "the bread
basket of the world" in the great
^Northwest; he led in its development
from a wilderness into what now
Br comprises six wealthy states dotted
with 4ft0.rtft0 farms: and he blazed
ia trail for transportation which reached
eventually from Buffalo to Asia,
with a total mileage of rail and steamship
facilities that would nearly girdle |
the earth. That but roughly spans i
the histcry of his achievement.
Near Guclph, in Ontario, where
James Jerome Hill was born, September
16, 1838, the son of an IrishCanadian
farmer, who died when the
boy was 15, there stands a tree stum))
labeled: "The last tree chopped by
James J. Hill.
It marked the lad's resolution to!
ISO to the United States. He had
been prompted by an odd incident;
according to the story that is told,
a strange traveler had stopped at the
Hill farm to take dinner, and left
his horse at the gate. Young Hill
caw the animal was tired and he carried
it a pail of water. The stranger
was pleased with the lad's thoughtfulness,
and as he drove off he tossed
. him a newspaper from the United
States and called out gravely:
"Go there, youngMnan. That country
nesds youngsters of your spirit"..
He Chopped His Last Tree.
Hill read the paper carefully. It
contained glowing accounts of opportunities
in the states. He resolved J
tn investigate for himself. It was
the next morning that he chopped his |
last tree.
As a mere roustabout lad of IS, he
fl toured from Maine to Minnesota,
I AVhen in 1S56 he disembarked from a
B Mississippi river packet at St. Paul,
that place was a frontier town of 5,000
B inhabitants. At the sign of \Y. J |
B Bass & Co., agents for the Dubuque j
& St. Paul Packet company, he found
B a job as both stevedore and clerk.
I | In the fifteen years that followed
I ' he seized every opportunity to study
the whole problem of river transK
portation. He gathered no end of
if experience and a little capital, with
which he launched his own firm 011
Hill, Griss & Co., which promptly I
V displayed its initiative by bringing
(the first load ot coal tnat nuu e>ci i
i been seen in that section into St. j
Paul. Two years later, with a flat- ;
bottomed steamer, he established the j
first regular communication with St.
Paul and the Manitoba ports of the
fertile Red river valley.
At about that time ?St. Paul was
having its first experiment in rail
road building. Eighty miles had been
laid to St. Cloud and 316 miles to
Brecken ridge, both of which terminals
were at the southern end of the Red.
river valley, and there were about
100 miles of track "which began no- [
whero and ended in that same indef- j
inite spot". This venture ran up a
debt of $33,000,000 and collapsed,
I with its only asseis ueing a
M stre.-.ks of rust and right of way".
* Bought Dead Railroad.
-Hill had had sufficient success in
the region to be seized with a con- j
suming desire to purchase the de-j
iunct property. After five years of!
^ financial dickering, including the sale
of all his other interests, which netI
? ted a fortune of $100,000, he and a
syndicate of thrae others?Sir Donald
A. Smith, George Stephen and NorI
man W. Kittson?obtained the object
cf this desire.
The St. Paul, Minnesota & Manitoba
railway was formed to operate
the property, with Hill as gener:>,l
manager. When in 1883 Mr. Hill
was elected president he undertook
the extension of the road from its
r Dakota and Minnesota homestead to
It- the Pacific ocean. He was confront- j
f ed by three great competitor - to the
south, each of which had received big
bonuses as government aid, whereas i
the "Manitoba" or the Great Northern
- a ha tnnvvn did not have
I " as 11 cumc L\J uv
I a doilar of government subsidy or an j
acre of grant to forward its progress ;
i'rom the .Minnesota boundary to the
| A sea.
flBt In this light, Hill's plan was widely i
a" deemed pure folly, but he pressed
it to conclusion by building and popI
ulating as he built. For several
I years he laid rails westward at the
IUSTRY
AWAY AT AGh OF 11
rate of a mile a day, and at a cost
of $o0.000 a mile, and as he went
he left a trail of embryonic farms by
the railside.
Turned Empire Builder.
With the line to Pudget Sound once
laid, he turned empire builder. He
introduced the livestock industry into
vast areas of bunch-grass plains, and
developed them by importing blooded
stock; he sent demonstration trains
through the country with men who
showed the people how to raise more
wheat to the acre: he made an outlet
for the grain by establishing a cheap
rate by rail and steamship to Buffalo
where ho built great elevators; in
fact for upwards of 20 years he left
nothing in his power undone to deI
velop the country where he had staked
out his claim as the great common
i
! carrier.
But at the Pacific tidewater he was
for hp saw in the Orient
11V/ L Ottt4k'^vv?, ?
still further opportunities. He organized
a fleet of Pacific steamships
for the commercial invasion of Japan
and China. Japan at the time wanted
steel rails, but proposed getting
them from England, as the rates
were less. It is related that when
John W. Gates, the steel magnate of
Chicago, came to Hill with the proposition
of getting American rail to
Japan, the latter replied:
"I will make you a rate of $S a
ton from Chicago or Pittsburg to
Yokohama. If that is too much, I
will carry it for the axle grease .used
on the locomotives and freight cars;
and if you can't stand that, I will
carry your freight for noihing".
At the $8 rate named, the American
manufacturer was enabled to
secure the Japanese contract.
American Grain to the Orient.
The same, tactics were adopted in
getting American wheat and flour into
Japan and China, where rice was
the staple food.
His faith in the Far West was rewarded
as liberally as that in the
Northwest. It is estimated that the
Pacific fleet now carries nearly
000,000 worth of products to the Orient
every year.
iT-n 1 ?? 1 * r? f
Willie Mr. rim umu u;>
and liis- .associates an immense fortune.
he also helped to create for the
settkii. along his line a wealth of
over billion dollars in real property,
which is represented by the value
of the 400,000 farms and their 65.000,000
acres of improved land.
Upon his retirement, at 69, the
"streak of rust" he had bought 30
years had expanded to more than
6.000 miles and it was earning gross
profits of more than $66,000,000 a year,
and carrying 15,000,000 tons of freight
annnsiiv. He still retained a hand in
the Great Northern's policy as chairman
or the <?oard of directors, while
his son Louis, who had worked up
from the humblest position of his
father's railroad, became president.
The secret of the Hill success was
no secret at all, according to Mr. Hill,
and he had no new recipes to offer.
'The man with the big opportunity
today", he said, "is the man in the
ranks". But the secret of failure he
frequently declared to be extravagance.
He regarded this as a national
tendency, against which he
strongly set himself,- particularly as
concerned the natural resources.
Attended to Details.
During his active supervision of the
Great Northern system, Mr. Hill over
saw almost every detail, to the wonder
of all employes with whom he came
in contact. Patrons of his lines have
liked and disliked him in rapid alternation,
for it was his point to have
his way, not only where his road
should run, but where his patrons
should settle. This was part of his
economic policy. He carried out a
singuiar regularity in the location of
branch lines, giving a minimum of
short lines on which light trains
were unavoidable. The principal
tflvt of his railway gospel was low
grades, heavy power, large capacity
cars and big train loads on his main
lines, and he began to preach this at
a time when these things were held
as visionary by most railway men.
In contact with the late E. H. Harriman,
who outdid him in the extent
of railway ownership, Mr. Hill was not
only the financial head, but the practical
head, of his great railway system.
He was the chief promoter and
president of the Northern Securities
company, organized with a purpose
to bring the Northern Pacific and
Great Northern under one ownership,
to which such opposition developed
that a suit was brought in the
rirruit court, which
L anv 4 i^vv*vvV
decided that tlie acquisition was an
illegal combination?affirmed in
March 1904 by the I'nitcd States supreme
court.
Loved Home. Books and Art.
Although always an extremely busy
man, and occupied with matters of
i
. . \
NT' : i :*':t::C< to ?COiiin onv.e;:i:h.
.w;. iiii! omul tinir to I?\ul :?
model l.cnie lil'e. I!e was always foiiu
of books and a great lover of art.
In his magnificent residence in St.
Paul lie had one of the finest private
i
i collections of paintings in the country,
containing many priceless master:
pieces of old masters. Eight miles
.north of St. Paul he had a fine farm!
~ l" ? ? ? * 1 AAA o ^/ \o /".ollor? !
UI illlji'y lilclil T,UUV UVI VOf wuvu
i "North Oaks", where he devoted himself
to scientific farming and stock
breeding. He did not derive any
| profit from his farm, however, as he
: sold the young stock to farmers and
! breeders along his railroad lines for
prices ordinarily demanded for common
unimproved stock.
Hill Left a Fortune of More Than
$200,000,000.
Mr. HiTs wealth is estimated at
from $100,000,000 to $500,000,000. He
was probably worth between $200,1000,000
and $250,000,000. He had t^e
absolute control of the First National
[tank and Northwestern Trust company
which have a combined capital
and surplus of $6,500,000. .Mr. Hill j
!was a lorge holder of stock in the;
1 Ptiop.i X'otinnal r>f Xf\V York. I
j f
: First National bank of Chicago and;
! the Northwestern National bank of j
.Minneapolis. He was a large owner
of the Great Northern Pacific Steamship
company.
The greatest portion of Mr. Hill's j
wealth, however, was in the stocks j
and bonds of Great Northern, North-;
ern Pacific and Chicago, Burlington!
|& Quincy railroads.
.Mr. Hill's last public bequests were
gifts for .the advancement of educa- j
I tion. in which he was deeply inter- j
I
jested throughout the latter years of
jliis life.
I !
TANLAC'S SUCCESS IS j
DUE TO MERITS
I
? . j
I "HOT AIR WILL FI T I P A BAL-!
| LOON, BUT IT.WON'T KEEP IT j
I P,*' SAYS A NOTED ADVERTISER
j
{
j TANLAC'S RECORD IS SUPREME
i
J Should Value He Lacking, the (Jeneral
Public. Long- Apo Would
Have Lost FaitIi in
Tanlac.
\
This is ah age of advertising, and
everyone is familiar with the popular
saying, "It pays' to ad.ertise."
Advertising is a business force. So
io +v.q ^hnrm cast bv its spell
pULCi.it 10 Lav ^
1
it has been known to perform marvelous
feats a::d to accomplish phen-,
omenal results.
It cannot be truly, said, however,
that everyone who advertises suci
ceeds for unless full value underlays
the article advertised the advertising
would ultimately fall of its own
weight. In this connection we must
not forget the words of the immortal
Lincoln, who said: "You can fool
some of the people all the time; you
can fool all of the people some of the
I
time, but you cannot fool all of the j
people all of the time." So if there is
not behind every advertisement a dollars
and cent-? -value to the article advertised,
no amount of advertising
i
will stimulate the sale on such an1
article beyond a certain point. This I
applies to every line of business and J
the modern business man or firm can '
only succeed through honest advertis- j
ing and fair dealing. j
One of the* most successful adver- j
tisers in America today is L. T. Cooper,
the manufacturer of the new med-1
icine, Tanlac. On one occasion Mr.!
Cooper said: "Hot air will put a balloon
up, but it won't keep it there."
When 1 offered Tanlac to the world i
something over a year ago, I did so
with the firm conviction that I was
| offering to the people tne oest aim
purest product of its kind on the
American market today and I did not
hesitate to expend vast sums for advertising
because I knew the more
the people knew about it the more!
they would buy it.
The success of the preparation was
immediate, and the people everywhere
were quick to recognize its
genuine merit and wonderful curati've
powers. I have never claimed j
Tanlac to be a "cure all" or that it
wo;:Id perform unheard of wonders
but I stated facts, stated them in a
straight-forward and business-like
way and in a manner that has com- j
manded confidence in the conservative
claims set forth.
I'nderlying these claims has been
real value, not from a dollars and
cents noint a o. o but from health as
well. The pheomenal success the
preparation has now achieved is familiar
to everyone. Xo matter where
you go Tar lac is a household word.
It has brought a new romance to the
modern business world. It is a story
j of an acceptance and appreciation of
| merit, m-ver before <. i>T;i:! 1 - < 1 dv a '
i
j ; re; \ci:?ry medici e Conservative
- mc:\ to whom the actual
. u ?es 4>i* tl:e production of Tanlac1
:\r.e been presented, have scouted
;ke;n until the proof was shown.
'i ':<* production of Ta lac now
snndx ?t the rate of almost ">.000,-!
000 bottles per year, or to be more j
corre.i 4/'00,000. The sale of 1,000,000
bottles during the first nine!
months probably exceeded any record j
|e-er before made by a proprietary!
Kio'iicine.
Through the -'Atlanta office alone J
approximately 400.000 bottles have'
| * I
been sold and distributed since De- j
cember 1st, and the South alone now j
requires over 1,000.000 bottles per.
year.
The?e enormous sales mean but!
o. e thing, and that is merit. One j
bottle is sold in a neighborhood!
through advertising, but ten more are j
sold after the first bottle produces j
results. People are always willing
to tell about their ailments, but they j
are more than willing to tell others
i of any medicine that helps them. It
is somehing they can't keep to them'
selves because the impulse to sym- j
pathize with fellow sufferers and I
;
I want to help them is one of the:
strongest as well as one of the big- J
! gest things in human nature.
PCK UP AGENTS j
i
Good Looks are Easy
Mn<vnAllo
j iTicig itviici
I Balm. 1p|p
i Look as good as your city cousins. No
j matter if you do Tan or Freckle Magnolia
Bairn will surely clear your skin instantly..
Heals Sunburn, too. Just put a little on
| your face and rub it off again before dry.
, Simple and sure to please. Try a bottle
: to-day and begin the improvement at j
once. White, Pink and Rose-Red Colors. :
' 75 cents at Druggies or by mail direcit.
SAMPLE FREE.
LYON MFG. CO., 40 So. Sth St.. Brooklyn. N.Y.
_ I
r-f-P-ni era lAl-n limiBIII
httbLt, Ab'tU WUfflAH
7 i
Says Vinol Made Her Strong;
| Grand Saline, Texas.?"I am an aged i
woman and for a long time was weak
and feeble but Vinol restored my health ;
; and strength so that I feel almost 3roung
again and am doing all my housework, j
Old people who are weak and feeble j
should try Vinol and know its merits as I
I do. It is the best medicine to create |
strength and for chronic colds I have I
ever taken."?Mrs.Fannie E.Rodgers. j
i Vinol, our delicious cod liver and iron
! tonic, is sold on our guarantee to benefit:
I or your money will be returned.
j Gilder & Weeks, druggists, New'
berry, S. C.
I Whenever You Need a General Tonl;
Take Grove's
The Old Standard Grove's Tasteless
| chill Tonic is equally valuable as a
: General Tonic because it contains the
, well known tonic properties of QUININE
! and IRON. It acts on the Liver, Drives
out Malaria, Enriches the Blood ana j
! Builds up the Whole System. 50 cents.
I ,
- - I
| NOMINATIONS.
For Congress:
FRED DOMINICK IS A CANDIDATE
FOR CONGRESS SUBJECT
mA mirn r?T-T TIC Ar TUP nvirn
HI 1 ItJtj ililJifii? vr I Xllli xrXv.li- I
CKATIC PARTY.
?
! I hereby announce myself as candidate
for Congress from the Third
District, subject to the Democratic
Primary.
JOHN A. HORTON.
I announce myself a candidate for
congress from the Third District I
! will ab?de the rules, regulations and
j results of the Democratic Primary,
j HENRY C. TILLMAN
I am a candidate for Congress from
the Third Congressional District, subject
to the rules of the Democratic
i Primary.
A. H. DAGNALL.
For Solicitor:
I hereby announce myself as a
candidate for the office of Solicitor!
of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of
South Carolina, composed of the counties
of Abbeville, Greenwood, Laurens
| and Newberry, subject to the rules of
the Democratic Primary.
B. V. CHAPMAN.
I hereby announce myself a candidate
for Solicitor of the Eighth ci^uit
| composed of the counties of GreenI
wood, Abbeville, I^aurens and Newberry
and will abide the rules of the
I Democratic Primary election.
HOMER S. BLACKWELL.
I
j T. Frunk McCord is hereby an|
nounced as candidate for Solicitor of
jtlie Eighth judicial circuit, subject to J
Democratic Primary.
I hereby announce myself as a candidate
for Solicitor of the Sth Judicial
District, composed of Abbeville, Laurens,
Newberry and Greenwood coun- :
i t
subject to th?; r:I?s o! tin- i> 1:1 ocratie
Primary.
GEO. T. MAG ILL.
For tlie State Senate:
Alan Johnstone is hereby nominated
for reelection to the State Senate, subject
to the Democratic primary.
For House of Representatives:
I am a candidate for the House of!
i
Representatives, subject to the rules
of the Democratic Party.
J. WM. Folk, M. D. !
I
H. H. Evans is hereby announced aj
a candidate for election to the House
of Renresentatives, subject to thi j
Democratic Primary.
For Clerk of Court:
I announce myself as a candidate j
for the office of Clerk of Court for j
Xewberrv County, subject to the ac-!
tion of the Democratic Primary.
F. W. HIGGINS.
1 hereby announce myself as u candidate
for reelection to the office of
Clerk of Court for Newberry county,
subject to the rules of the Democratic!
Primary.
JNO. C. GOGGANS.
For Probate Jndee:
The many friends of J. B. Baker
I
announce him a candidate for Probate
.Judge of Newberry County .md pledge
him to abide the rules of the Democratic
Party.
J. ?.I. K. Bushardt is hereby announced
as a candidate for the unexpired
term of Probate Judge for Newberry
County, subject to the rules of
the Democratic Primary.
W. F. Ewart is hereby announced as
a candidate for the unexpired term of
Probate Judge for Newberry County,
subject to the Democratic Primary.
Dr. Van Smith is hereby announced
as a candidate for the unexpired term
of Probate Judge of Newberry County,
subject to the Democratic Primary.
For Sheriff:
t am n randidate for reelection to i
the office of Sheriff of Newberry county,
subject to the rules of the Democratic
Primary.
CANNON G. BLEASE. j
I hereby announce myself as a can-J
didate for Sheriff of Newberry County,>
subject to the Democratic Primary. j
M. M. BUFORD. I
j
For County Treasurer:
I hereby announce myself as a
candidate for the office of County
Treasurer, subject to the rules of the
Democratic Primary.
CLAUDE C. SCHUMPERT.
I hereby announce myself a candidate
for treasurer of Newberry county,
subject to the rules of the Democra-1
~ j
tic rnmary.
JAS. F. EPTING.
I hereby announce myself as a candidate
for reelection to the office of
County Treasurer, subject to the Democratic
Primary.
JNO. L. EPPS.
I hereby announce myself as a candidate
for the office of County Treasurer
and will abide by tv." rules and!
regulations of the Deme Viatic pri-|
mary.
E. M. LANE.
I hereby announce myself as a candidate
for the jffice of County Treasurer,
subject to the rules of the Demo-1
cratic Primary. If elected, T will en-1
deavor to discharge faithfully the du-j
ties of the offics. I wi!l appreciate!
your support.
WILLIAM E. PELHAM, SR.
For Auditor:
I hereby announce myself as a candidate
for the position of Auditor for
Newberry county, subject to the rules
of the Democratic party.
W. R. REID. i
1
^ 1
I hereby announce myself as a can- I
didate for the office of Auditor for!
Newberry county and will abide by the j
rules of the Democratic Primary.
J. MOODY BEDENBAUGH.
I hereby announce myself as a candidate
for election to the office of
County Auditor, subject to the rules
of the Democratic Primary.
J. E. HALFACRE.
For Superintendent of Education:
J. S. Wheeler is hereby announced
as a candidate for County Superintendent
of Education, subject to the
Democratic Primary.
To the Voters of Newberry County:
I hereby announce my candidacy;
for the office of County Superintendent
of Education, subject to the rules and
regulations of the Democratic Primary.
I seek the office "not for what I can
get out of it, but for what I can
put into it".
CLE MS ON M. WILSON.
I am a candidate for County Superintendent
of Education for Newberry
t
-
county r.r.d will abide the rules of the
Democratic primary election.
ELBERT II. A I'LL
For Master:
I hereby anonunce myself a crjididate
for reelection as Master for
Newberry county, subject to the rules
of the Democratic Party.
H. H. RIKARD.
I hereby announce myself as a cxa
didate for the office of Master for Newberry
county, subject to the Democratic
Primary.
JAS. D. QUATTLEBAUM.
For Supervisor:
I hereby r.nnounce myself as a candidate
for County Supervisor, subject
to the Democratic Primary.
HENRY M. BOOZER.
I hereby announce myself as a candidate
for reelection to the office of
Supervisor for Newberry county and
will abide by the rules and regulations
of the Democratic Primary.
J. C. SAMPLE.
ror tounty commissioner:
I hereby announce myself as a candidate
for reelection to the office o'
County Commissioner of Newberry
County, and will abide the rules of the
Democratic party.
L C. LIVINGSTON
I hereby announce myself as candidate
for County Commissioner of Newberry
county, subject to the Democratic
Primary.
SILAS J. CROMER.
I hereby announce myself as a candidate
for Sub-Commissioner of NewJjerry
County, subject to the Democratic
Frimary.
FELIX A GRAHAM.
For Coroner: F.
M. Lindsay isjierebj* announced
as candidate for reelection as. Coroner
for Newberry county, subject -to
the Democratic Primary. .
I hereby announce myself as a candidate
for the office of Coroner of
Newberry county and will abide the
result of the Democratic Primary.
G. H. RUFF.
For Magistrate o> Townships 1 and 8:
L. M. Player is hereby announced as
a candidate for reelection as Magistrate
for Townships Xos. 1 and S,
subject to the Democratic Primary.
I hereby announce myself a candi
date for Magistrate for Xos. 1 and 8
Townships, subject to the rules of
the Democratic Primary.
CHAS. W. DOUGLASS.
or Magistrate of Townships 1 and 8:
D. A. Livingston is hereby announcd
as a candidate for election as Magstrate
for Townships Xos. 1 and S,
ubject to the Democratic Primary.
Magistrate For >"o.
C. K. Alewine is hereby announced
as a candidate for reelection as Magistrate
for No. 2 township, subject to
the ruies of the Democratic Primary
Magistrate For >*o. 3:
Joseph H. Adams is hereby announced
as a candidate for reelection
as Magistrate for No. 3 township, subject
to the Democratic Primary.
I hereby announce myself as a candidate
for Magistrate for No. 3 town- #
ship subject to the rules of the Democratic
Primary.
ttt tn nT^mrmn T7i/~\r? n
VV. D. Jttu inriivr unu.
For Magistrate >'o. o Township:
The friends of Hix Connor hereby
nominate him for Magistrate of Township
No. 5 and pledge him to abide by
the Democratic Primary.
For Magistrate >'o. 0, ''
Cary G. Johnson is hereby announced
as candidate for Magistrate for
Township No. 6, subject to the Democratic
primary.
For Magistrate >~o. 4; ^
I am a candidate for reelection to"
V??i Affi/io nf Yfajristrntp for 4
IUV UWiVV vi. v Township,
and will abide the rules of
the Democratic party.
R. M. AUGHTRY.
For Magistrate 3io. 6 Township:
J. H. Dorroh is hereby announced
as a candidate for Magistrate of No.
6 Township, subject to the Democratic
Primary.
For Magistrate >'o. 7 Township:
W. P. Allen is hereby announced
as candidate for reelection as Magistrate
fo. No. 7 Township, subject to
the Democratic Primary.
For Magistrate No. 9 Township:
S. L. Fellers is hereby announced
is a candidate for Magistrate for No.
9 township, subject to the DemocraticPrimary.
For Magistrate No. 11 Township:
I hereby announce myself as a candidate
for reelection as Magistrate for
No. 11 Township, subject to the rule?
of the Democratic Primary.
H. H. RUFF.
A
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