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The herald and news. (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, July 14, 1916, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063758/1916-07-14/ed-1/seq-2/

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<8> COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WO
AGRICrL
$> FARMERS' EXCHA>
T. M. Mills, County Demonstrate
<? Miss Willie Mae Wise, Home Econ
?>
iCv^AAAAAAAAAAAA/^Ai^
^ 7 wy w 7 w wv v v ^ v
It is not yet too late to sow cow 1
peas. Newberry county already has
more peas sown probably than ever i
t
before in any single year, but there I
are yet many acres that should be !
seeded to this valuable hay crop and j
soil builder. If you have never tried i
it iea*e at least a few acres this fall |
uncut and when the vines are mature I
turn them under and then harrow in !
oat* ana vetch or clover ana rye ior
a winter cover crop. This winter
cover crop will keep much valuable
plant food from laching away and at
the same time the legumes will be
gathering free nitrogen from the air
and storing it in the soil for next
year's crop. The rye and oats will
conserve plant food already in the
soil and will add much humus when
turned in the spring. If farmers will
fellow this practice a few years they
"will be independent of commercial
fertilizer except phosphoric acid on
clay lands and acid and potash on
sand lands.
Begin now to look out for seed for
this winter's cover crop. Don't leave
your fields bare to be leaching away
- and getting poorer all the time.
Don't fail to plant a fall crop of
Irish potatoes. The Lookout Moun
tain is an excellent variety for the
late crop. As a preventive against
scab soafc the potato for two hours in
a Eolution of formalin, one pint to 33
gallons of water before planting.
Be sure to can all your surplus
fruits and vegetables. Stop this great
waste and lay up something for tho
rainy days of next winter and spring.
For Sale.
4,000 pounds good sound crimson
clover seed in the rough. All raised
in Newberry county.
Pure Duroc Jersey pigs by eight
<e> t
A PRIVATE'S DICTIONARY. y
^ <S>
(Private?The whole bonnet
Colonel?The trimmings.
Major?An officer of minor importance.
Mule?An irreligious brute of the
animal kingdom, his rank is three
notches above the first sergeant.
Bugler?A third class private, as
v wind .jammer, who disturbs slumber
and poker games.
Mess?A poor excuse lor a square
meal.
Dicharge?A ticket to heaven.
(Pay (Day?(A great day in the army,
when all men are alike a day to set
tie disputes and patronize the canteen.
Canteen?A place we get our beer
and the big head.
Guard 'House?A heaven of rest for
good soldiers.
Guard Duty?A crime unpardonable.
Drill?A disgrace to any private. ,
Dress Parade?A sport the officers
are stuck on; or Anglo Saxon for
cake walk. J
Women?A female creature thatj
comes to camp to ask questions and,
see things.
ICraps?A good game to dispose of
fifteen sixty, or the game that made
the American soldiers famous.
at, ?:
& uxieciiu&?ta. gauiei nig ui )
thLsty officers in a secret place to i
discuss politics. Liquid refreshments j
are secured.
'Chaplain?A retired hard shell j
preacher who has lost his religion!
and comes to camp to umpire poker
games.
LYCERI>E iMD BARK
PRETEST APPENDICITIS
The simple mixture of buckthorn
bark, glycerine, etc., known as Adleri-ka,
astonishes Newberry people.
Because Adler-i-ka acts on BOTH
lower and upper bowel, ONE SPOONFUL
relieves almost ANY CASE constipation,
sour stomach or gas. It
removes such surprising foul matter
that a few doses often relieve or- prevent
appendicitis. A short treatment
Helps chronic stomach trouDie. Tne
INSTANT, easy action of Adler-i-ka
is astonishing. Gilder & Weeks Co,
druggists.
Invigorating to the Pale and SicR?y
The Old Standard general strengthering tonic.
GROVE'S TASTELESS chill TONIC, d^ves ov*
Mal^jia.eariche ?t leblood.ardbnilds spine
lem. A Uue iut -C. tor aCuits %-C ci. lurc-c- L/jc j
\
^ I
Iltt 1> ?>
TIRE AND HOME ECONOMICS ^
<$>
T.E DEPARTMENT <*'
in Agent Prosperity, S .C 3*
omics Prosperitv, S. C. * '
a 1
" I
' > 3> <? <$> <?> $> 3 <s ^ <S> ^ <?> .
i
or ten farmers. Some now ready lor
delivery.
Five shotes, nice for barbecue at
S cents.
Wanted.
One good milch cow.
j}?oundiii?r for the Peacli Tree Borer.
Clemson College, July 13.?Between !
July 1 and 10 pull up the earth!
around the base of the peach tree to J
a height of eight inches; take these ;
mounds down October 15. The reason I
for the above recommendation is as j
fo:lo\vs:
1. The peach tree borer has four
lite history stages, (a) The eggs laid \
in the fall hatch into (b) worms;
these worms when full grown come
out ol the tree into the ground and |
fGrm the (c) pupa or resting stage.
This stage is passed about an inch
from the tree and about an inch below
the surface of the soil. From
these pupae the (d) full grown, beautiful,
clearwinged moths emerge,
which lay the eggs for the next year's
generation. There is only one generation
each vear.
If you mound too early many of
the worms in the tree will work upward.
They begin to come out into
the soil July 1 and continue to come
out until about August 22. If you
mound the trees as above stated then
the pupa has about eight inches of
soil over it, through which the moth
can not dig to come to the surface.
The female lays her eggs on the bark
o 4 +Vi/\ aiiwfn aa nf f Vi a ciaiI A r* r\rrcr r*
CL L LLIKJ iUiiatC U1 LUC OU11. -Mi L11C
are nearly all laid by October 1 and
hatched by October 15, it is readily
seeD that when the mounds are taken
down the worms are eight inches
high on the tree and if the tree is examined
the second week of November j
any worms, may be easily located and
working in the outer bark they can
De removed witn tne least trouDie.
(S. C. Experiment Station Circular.)
UNITE RSI TY OF SOUTH CAROLINA
Entrance Examinations.
Entrance examinations to the University
of South Carolina will be reld
by the County Superintendent of Education
at the county courthouse Fri
day, July 14th, 1916.
The university offers varied courses
of study in science, literature, history,
law and business. The expenses are
moderate and many opportunities for
self-support are afforded. A large
number of scholarships are available.
Graduates of colleges in this State receive
free tuition in all courses except
in the School of Law. For full particulars,
write to The President,
University of South Carolina,
Columbia, S. C.
ttiiri n v\ o
way swear, wear:
Use 'Gets-It'
for Corns!'
It's the >Tew Plan?Simple?Sure as
Fate?Applied in a Few Seconds.
"Why, John, I never knew you to
use such language. I've told you
several times it's no use to try those
bandages, salves, tapes, plasters and
contraptions for corns. Here's some
'Gets-It,' it's just wonderful how easy,
'clear and clean' it makes any corn
TTon Wouldn't Lose Tour Temper, John,
You Used 'Geta-It" for Those CorasP
comes right off. Takes but a few seconds
to anDlv. It dries at once. Put
your sock on right over it?there's
nothing to stick or roll up, form a
bundle of your toe, or press on the
ccrn. It's painless, simple as rolling
off a log. iNow put away those knives
razors and scissors, use 'Gets-It' and
you'll have a sweeter disposition and
no more corns and caluses."
"Gets-It" is sold by druggists everywhere,
25c a bottle, or send direct by
E. Lawrence & Co., Chicago, 111. Sold
in Newberry and recommended as the
world's best corn remedy by Gilder &
Weeks, W. G. Mayec and P. E. Way.
NINETEEN DEATHS
FROM DREAD DISEASE
Additional Victims of Infantile Paralysis
in New York During Twenty-four
Hours.
New York. July !?.? Nineteen more
deaths ffom infantile paralysis in j
.\t!W I Ui iv (.'II \ 1UI 11IC _ ? J1U1II B C1IU" |
ing at 10 o'clock this morning were;
reported by the department of health j
tonight, making the total fatalities
224 since the epidemic started. There
was a drop in the number of new
cases. SS being- reported today against |
9." the day before. The total number j
of cases now has reached 9S0. The j
mortality rate still is about 23 per !
cent. Broklyn continued to lead with j
new cases. j
In several -New Jersey towns no-;
tic-e was served by the health author- j
ities that non-resident children under
16 must not be permitted to enter.
The federal and city health author-\
ities here are concentrating their ef-j
forts to prevent the spread of the.
disease to outlying districts.
Mayor Mitchel today announced
ovarr etroof trill ho flfiQnofl pa nil '
night.
BARBECUES
BARBECUE?We will give a first
class barbecue at the Newberry fill,
Friday, July 21. The dinner will
be cooked by the old cook, H.
. Wicker. A good dinner is promised
to all. Every candidate is especially
invited. B. M. Suber and 0. A.
Felker.
6-9-td.
BARBECUE?I will give a first class
barbecue with the usual good dinner
at Mt. Pleasant on July 14,
campaign day, and will give good
service and make it pleasant for all
who attend. G. H. Cromer and Company.
BARB'ECUE?We will give a first
class barbecue in front of B. B.
Leitzsey's residence July 27, 1916.
Everybody invited. B. B. Leitzsey,
A. G. Leitzsey. J. F. Lominack.
BARBECUE at St. Pauls?Under the
auspices of the ladies of the St.
Pauls Lutheran church, a barbecue
will be served at the church
grounds on July 15. The dinner will
*? i?J v? +l.o+ fomAiie piioiet .1
UC COUKCU UV Hi<AL lUUiUU^J VUV.Ub ~ .
I). H. Kibler.
5-23-tf.
The School Improvement association
of the St. Phillips school "will
give a barbecue in Mr. T. E. Halfacre's
grove near the school house
on August 10 for the benefit of the
school. Everybody and the candidates
are invited. There "will foe entertainment
arranged for the young
folk.
T ?jii ? Via Tho/nip at Po
1 Will luiuisii a. vw.v ?
maria on campaign day August 1.
Good dinner and pleasant day promised
to all.
J. Walter Richardson.
We the undersigned will give a first
class Barbecue at New Hope church,
Saturday, July 29, 1916 for the benefit
of the Broad River circuit parsonage.
Everybody is invited to come
out and enjoy the day with us and at
tinno "holrk -a P'Ofxi CaUSe.
Liic cx mv * * " " - 11 v a o ? ? ? ?-?
Members.
ANOTHER SERIOUS
EIOOD SITUATION
Chattahoochee River Threatens to
Inundate Streets of the City of
Colnmbus, Ga?
Macon, G^., July 9.?Another serious
flood situation has developed at
Columbus tonight, where the Chattahoochee
river is not only threatening
two big dams, but is threatening
to flood the city of Columbus. Streets
o? Girard, Ala., are already under
water, according to a direct report
to this city.
A rise of two feet in the Chattahoochee
river will put the Colunibus
gas plant out of commission. A nvefoot
rise will put the Chattahoochee
river into the streets of Columbus,
and there is no forecast tonight that
the water may not go to that point.
Reports from West Point at 5 o'clock
indicate that a big swell is 'due to
pass Columbus by 6 o'clock Monday
morning.
At one point at Columbus the Chattahoochee
river is half a mile wide
ATrarflnwpd throusrh a creek
aiiu. iiao v* v*"v .. vv. ?
valley into Girard, Ala., and that
town is divided by a rushing torrent
of water.
y Only One "BROMO QUININE"
fo set the jrenu2ne, call for f'iil name, "LA.XA
TIYE BROMO QUININE. Look for signature o:
E. Vv*. GROVE. Cures a Cold in One Day. Stopf
tcusib and headache, and worK j of- cold '!Lr
ASSURANCE OF VICTORY
EXPRESSED BY TEUTONS
Military Correspondent of the Berlin
Zeitung am Mittajr Summarizes
the Present Situation in War.
Berlin, July G (via London. July 7;.
?The military correspondent of the
Zcitmig am Mittag, commenting 0:1
the war situation, writes:
"The lighting on all fronts is increasing
in extent and violence. The
enemy everywhere is attempting to
throw fresh troops into the struggle
which seems to be approaching nearer
and nearer its maximum intensity.
The mightiest exertions are being
made on all sides to force a decision
and the tension can scarcely Become
higher.''
After summarizing the official reports
from the various theatres of
war, the correspondent continues: "it
still is too early for a final verdict
upon the situation as the struggles on
the principal fronts still are in progress.
The Germans, however, hitherto
have been able to hold up the
enemy's advance on the west, as well
as on the south and east. Neither
British, French, Russians nor Italians
nave attained large or aecisive successes,
while in places where the
central powers have assumed the offensive,
as in Volhynia and south o!
the Dniester, their operations have
been conducted with success.
"This situation enables us to look
forward with a certain amount of assurance
and with cairn confidence to
further developments of the fighting.
We do not dare, however, overlook
the fact that our opponents are making
mighty efforts and throwing in all
available forces to attain success. Our
troops on all fronts are faced by
numerically superior forces and
therefore are confronted with the
prospect of further heavy fighting."
The correspondent devotes comparatively
more space to the combats
on the east front than to those on
the west, declaring that the Russians'
attack aeainst Field Marshal von
Hindenburg, Prince Leopold and
Count- Botbmer give every evidence
from the extent and masses of the
troops employed that an offensive of
a larger scale is contemplated.
Still Fighting Hindenfonrg.
[He adds that the fighting along von
Hindenburg's front still is in progress,
.but asserts that the attack
against Prince LeoDold's armies aD
pears to have bee^i finally and decis- j
ively repulsed with the heavies:
losses.
The fighting continues on the upper
Styr, he says, and the Russians were
able to cross the river and gain a
foothold in one place, but the coun- !
terattack already has begun. The
Russians were thrown back in Volhynia
and on the Stripa froi-c, he concludes,
and the victory at Tlumach,
buuui oi Liie -uiuesier, is increasing
in extent.
THE HERALD AND NEWS ONE
YEAR FOR $1.50. 1
-TOP
.VrW
Glass 1
I Don't put
I-_ T HT
yuur icc i ea I v
other Glasswai
just received e
ment. Remem
counters. Y 01
I some very usef
| them. See my
Mayes Book & 1
The House of 1(
l^Bw?;:::-??Bj>:^^
?MHkv ^
Wake up bfii
The Bell Telephone is th<
| Ring up on the Bell.
You may talk about du
! your breath but it won't h
j breath to talk into your Bell 1
Ring up old customers, tl
of prospects, there is no qui
saves more time or expense.
It you haven't a Bell i <
Call the Business office for ra
?
SOUTHERN BELL TEL
AND TELEGRAPH 0
BOX 163. COLU1
Cost
. than the plain
\ several other st
/ \ When vou buy a Fi*
I I the best tire on the m<
J \ is reasonable and
> / M returns this year <
j[l]il)f)||l||J-| Compare '
g iJliiMj' on Fisk Grey
P 3 x 30 . . 10.40
P3| x . . I3.4U
4 x 33 . . 22.00
and remember that b
is Fisk FREE service
Branches.
M.UADm
Fi' k Branches in Mo\
nr m
I
iVare
off buying
? * *
im biers and j
re. I have
i new shiptbermy
10c
i ...111 ? I
i Will llllll | J
ul things on m
window. 1
Variety Store '
)00 Things
u mmamaaamrnmammmammmamm
I
. . '< ^
t :
mt \
?<s?-/9L.
/ i
Ifteis! ;!
e Big Ben of Business.
ill times 'till you lose
elp matters, save your s
(Telephone.
ten start on a fresh list *
cker way ? none that
ilephone, get one now.
tes.
EPHONE #??r% 1
OMPANY 'JMJ
1EIA, S, C.
>
I
Less ,
tread styles of
andard makes.
sk Non-Skid you get
arket for a price that ,
right?the mileage
are better than ever.
These Prices
Non-Skid Casings
4\ X 35 . . 31.20
41 x 36 . . 31.55 1 j
5 x 37 . . 3730 J
esides Fisk Quality there ;
i.i? i iz rv
ai Iliuic uicui i yucu
I
f MOWER 1
re 77ian 725 Crtfes

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