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The herald and news. (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, August 08, 1916, Image 7

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063758/1916-08-08/ed-1/seq-7/

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(uli C \ U ' .
r
No people of the world have more j
in w: To glory tl;;n t: o p^ojOe of
SouiL C rolina. -No: once since her
foundation has she despaired. even
when in de;ths from v. hi oh it seemed
impossible to rise. Let us r,irn our j
,
attention to that state uur:ng tne ten
years of reconstruction which i'ollowed
the horrible war between the I
states. Just as South Carolina was
the first state in seceding from the
union so was she first in sufferings.
A grander man has never lived than
the southern soldier. See him as he
k returns hor e from war ragged, half
starved and penniless. On the spot
r where had stood his beautiful resi-1
r dence are heaps of ashes. Does the !
J - 3 .3 - ~ 1
flero despairiue wvru uc?yaii lia.^
never been added to his vocabulary j
of words which serve him in useful-j
ness. He has now concluded that all j
is for the best iand with eyes fixei
toward heaven he resolves to do all
in his power to make the -United
States the grandest nation that the
world has ever know-n ana to mase
| this beautiful southland of ours even
more beautiful and more prosperous
than she was before the war. For a
brief period all is forgotten in the reunion
of husband, father, and lover
with wife, -children and sweatheart,
l (tho some do not have this pleasure)
i and then work of reconstruction bep
gins. The beautiful homes are re[
placed by two room houses, in most
[ instances made of logs, the beautiful j
rtrViio-h ViaH artarned the southern i
r Ui tOO TT'JUAV^ ?. - ladies
now replaced by a coarse;
'homespun woven by 'her own bands, \
and on the table which had been laden J
? with plenty can now be seen parched i
| v corn, cornbread and some times
syrup. But what cared they for food,
for clothing or for comfort? There ;
"was a far greater misfortune over-j
hanging her than either of these, one!
that was destined for ten years to j
threaten not only the safety of the
-4-1 - > ^ ~ 4- V* /-\ /"?"f
sout-uerii states, uut cxic
f the union.
As soor "s the slave had been freed
the question arose as to what was to (
be done for the support of the negro. J
A faithful few wished to remain with |
their former ifcaster. but this was imi
possible, unless, indeed they were very
faitful. Soon, "however. This question
was changed to the question as
to what was to be done for the prom
tection of the whites. soon as
W . the war v.as over avaricious men of
the north began to plot with tlie men <
w
r ] I 'D RATHER NOT jl I DON'T Li
CLIMB TO DAY, THE IDEA
| I HAVE SORT OF BEING T!
A PREMONITION TOGETHE.
?5?\THfiT >50i^E- rv cnpp '
^LTHING'S GOING H U If
I .
' !
; (
v
L COPYRIGHT /9/S. NATIONAL- ^ft|Jj]
rnfr-/v).v szpev/rF mpp ^liflfcffui
^ | WTfir W/.r .
\
. . c
' and in b .
wealthy. Thus we see that av?.;t:i
Oaro-ira had three gr*-at evils to contend
?t,1 i. namely the carpetbagger,
the scalawag and the negro. Words
cannot describe or visions fancy the
sufferings which were undergone :y
South Carolina's sons and daughfeis
during the period from 1S66-1S76.
At first it seemed that aii would go
well under Lincoln but after his assas^inaiion.
Johnson was overpowered
by congress, in vain the brave-southerners
strove to keep the negro from
the poll. Ho was convinced by the
carpetbagger and by the scalawag
that lie was as good as any white man
and was persuaded to believe that if
hi only voted as they directed that he
would soon become the owner of forty
acres and a mule with the white man
to cultivate his land. Oh. disgusting
sigt! See the slothful negro as he
walks down the street with a cigar in j
is mouth not even making way for j
fair maidens. Hear him as he says that;
he is going to legislature this year j
and that some day he intends being j
- ^ -a* / > i ,
governor 01 soum \jaruima. m, ;
he adds, "the bottom rail is on the
top and we are going to keep it there." ,
For six years during this period j
the office of governor was in the hands j
of Robert Scott of Ohio and Moses of
South Carolina. It would be hard to ;
conceive of a man more wicked than !
I
either of these, two. These men to- j
aether with three negroes in legis-1
lature robbed the state treasures, j
iXegroes were now appointed as i
school commissioners, mayors and
other places of responsibility, which i
many white men were not capable
of fielding. This period has well i
been said to have been "under the rule :
of the robbers.Being under military i
ru!6, bouin taruima nuw luunu i
beautiful name taken from rer and in
its place she was calle-d "Military district
number 2." j
On coming into power the negro resolved
not only to have control of the i
government but also to intermarry
with the whites. There is no sight so .
pitiful as that of the former slave who
formerly had scarcely dared to talk
with his young mistress now trying
to force her to become his wife. Oh.1
pitiful sight! See him as he smiles,
sickeninglv. asking her to become his
wife and as she refuses see his manner
change, as grinding his teeth h*
clasps his big black hand into her
sr?t"; white throat. It was r.ms tuai,
r ailed forth every particle of manhood '
Kc DON'T FcRR M^PfCAN .
QF C>EPfNP ENTiRPLY ON ME_
pn y/HEN I WAS IN SVVlTZfl?
rujittji i-an0 i used toclin6
k vnirh j?gvery day. \\'hy
c ' there's nobody cf>t\
/Oi T?lLme.anything
1 //
. O &TT>r\^
-0^ i \ k
/ I j | !j
Si
.-?S? Jffigy :
?mm
$":Wk
flflllp ^
. ' ' l.oui.;;
- i ly : a>e s v.
friffl'i-ten tiic n?^ro. . hese men fircss<
o nc. i": - - cf fns: rode
tli!"J the country frighten ins ~-n
sometimes : the ne-ro but
never unjustly. Scorn the man who
tries i occnvime you that the membe:.-,
-it i.-i}?. K'.utj were of rerellioi-^
s- "irit. .'? S ---:I*i m: :i vro
brave in war they v. ere still h**aver
duriii'jr tl.e perio-i of re on.struct 'to.
In the- former they fousrht for their
country. in the latter for their country
and for teir \v<:nen. They we-e
ready to die for her. "Greater lov*
horVi 7ia msn this that a man
will lay down his life for his friend."
Eventually after having accomplished
many good works and not saving one
O! two lives but many, the K3an csnru%
to an end.
In IS76 the true hearted patriotc
of our state determined to have Wade
Hampton as governor. As the negroes
in our state outnumbered the whites,
there was hut one way in which thio
1 >10 rtnnp ar>H that was hv cheat
ing the negro. A deed which if it was
a sin heaven forgave before it was
committed. Bands of men, wearing
red shirts rode thru the country by
Hampton's side. At night on coming
to a bridge these men rode back and
forth several times so that the negro
would believe their number greater
than it actually was. On election
day they followed him to Columbia
^+/-? fiorVif fnr "nim On fhio (^PV
j cau v iu i\ji 'iiiui. ^
Hampton was declared governor and
this was tbe most glorious day that
South Carolina h.is ever" had. Our
fathers loved Wade Hampton. Any
confederate veteran will tell you that
Wade Hampton redeemed South -Carolina
from the negro rule and that he
is the greatest man that 'South Carolina
ever had.
- - - .. . A
Since his time tne government iias
been under the control of the white
man. Today South Carolina is one
of the most patriotic states of the
union. Today hhe is enjoying peace.
Rut the price of peace was well paid
for. To many the reconstruction
period seems; a mere vision -or myth
but yet we are tile very flesh and blood
of these brave lion 'hearted men.
Then let no person of South Carolinian
birth ever ?toop to do anything
~ ?.ill ^ 4- y-N r\ rvorrjfi -P /*vn '/*
Will JCMf'.L *JII 1/.1C \_>i vui
fair southern state.
Oil. benerable fathers! How your
.j
BOA ? SPBM0
i "why ithe pik
is a mole hll
comparison "
mountains i
. before brcfl
emery horn
t'auit_blowinq
fl BOUT YOURSELI
COi-Du'RN IDIOT
\\V LOOK OUT v."ic
\x\'?i going: i?
If
JMiPw
\ \\
' -'Wmm
!!;<\\v M 1 (h^
IliWWj ;'A W|W
I i ' Y\ / i'y v
! iy %M :q
;iiC 11: i i :r
I :: t. 2;:;s Vr*?vTi.>
i. i' t \> ;i * i .1 i. ;1 J.
I
j Eepuuikan Noifime< oiacs ior
I AJJ34 JKiliK-Sii io t'oUS'Jlulfca
Fruix * '?{> tWiLi
^ i
!
j ?
V<*?* Vnrk A11 </ 1 - 1;L.f ](: ? K.
il J?hes, tw ice today -de. iared .iia&v!:
:;i iavor ot i;ii niuv^.tiuani i.i . . ..
era.; constitution grafting the ^ete to
*> omen.
in a letter to Senator i'uincrianc of
1 'tan. Mr. Hughes state:! 1,1s ; er&c.n^I
view that the proposed a;.ic;-i ; .it
; .u.:i be submitted by confess t<?
the States and rat ill eel. 1 a a f.j cc- :
late today before ;>0C women of the
Women's Roosevelt league lor
Hughes, the nominee declared the
question was one affecting the whole
: country and that he favored "taking
j the shortest cut to its solution."
In 'his address to the league Mr.
' Hughes again assailed the ^dmimstraj
tion for its policy concerning Amerij
can ri-ghts abroad during the Euro- j
! pean war.
The nominee also made a luncheon !
I address today to about 50 New York j
! c + Dnmiklinon oHifrtrc in ix'Vlir*?'. VlP !
j 0"lJ.;xc nc j;uum,aij u <u n??vu ? - .
I said he 'had twice been called upon to J
live down an underserved reputation j
for coldness and aloofness, and that
|
ihe now was passing through the thiri
' experience. The luncheon was private.
I Tonight Mr. Hughes addressed a
small meeting invited by Herbert
Parsons, nation,i.l committeeman fori
; ^ _ . J
J 'i\eW KirK, LU HitJCL LUC IJUHJlllcc ax. ;
an uptown club. The meeting was,
i private.
j In 'his address to the women's:
! league Mr. Hughes said:
j "This is a campaign-in which I am
| sure -* omen can not fail to take a very '
profound interest. They feel more ''
I keenly perhaps thin any one else
j with resrec-t to the national honor and
S the importance of its maintenance, to
.
, our proper preparation and our se- j
\
j curity; and further, to that organizai
tion in our life in all its activities 1
; which will give us an America going
I forward lo meet the responsibilities '
I which are sure to be upon us after:
the war is over.
"I notice that you represent a very i
strong1 feelin.g with regard to our re-;
. lation to American rights in connec-'
, tion with that war?to our relation to
, the maintenance of American rights
j in connection with Mexico. We do:
j not wish in this country to be brought i
. into unnecessary conflict. There is 1
i
1 T 1 I ! ?
HE MAK?$ A ^T?f
TH6 "WRONS DIRECT
peak I / "
-lin j) a - 4^
TO THE n&n v- A . ' )0
CLIMBED >k - /
KFflST ^L3y-y^^k^
tiw^ ' -C / 'i/
HOLD ON TIGHT I'LL
SEND SOMEBODY TO V^V/
HELP YOU,THOUGH YOU
don't deserve it : \
ff- J
o J |
Ppp n
: ... ' - ' . . V . '
U.i'J ' - - i-? y : j ! I Hit! 1 s
o. K->r.?' I y k::t;v. l.ial before.
!: vj;; say tliey been lacking in
hrmi'ioss and consistency, thc-y say:
We are to bo ::riii un<i consi.ster.:
now.'
'Tliis is reckoning time. He
a"o all stockholders in a great cor
j >ra'ioi5. We i'jOrC o*>G!" tnal j a 1 a 11 ?o
" ,and we ) a serious debit balance,
and we do not ir .-t the aJmin-at
ion t ::a: a a " e oro gat it a >o it.
Can't >ee Hiison.
"7 .ere an incurable defect of
::ar:-.Mer < :' t'..e administration with
respett to e weakness and vacillation
which. nave characterized it; and
we can not expect improvement from
that source.''
"I do not understand." the Republican
nominee said, returning to suf-1
frage, "how any candid mind can examine
the tendencies of our life and
reach a conclusion that permanently
votes will be defied to women. I
think it is impossible.
"I depreciate most deeply sex or- j
ganizations, based upon sex and not
upon the general obligation of citizenship
borne by all. I view with a
" - A r% ylAnff ifllio f 1 An i
r-,1 ti M, UCdl Ul uiistnnjc, a. wnuiiuaiiuu I
? I
of the agitation which I am sure will ^
grow more and more intense as this |
movement meets determined opposi- i
tion. . . . And so I want to see
women, if they are to have the vote.1
as I believe they ought to, come m
as citizens with men.
"I desir? to see them not organized ;
on a sex basis, developing sex antag- j
onism, but with, the responsibilities
!
of citizers. And .-o I stated that 1
favored woman suffrage.
"Now, I did not state last night my
attitude with regard to the federal
amendment. That matter was not
stated speeificaly in the Republican
platform. Today, in answer to a tel-;
egrani from S-enator Sutherland of
Utrh. I stated that, consistently with
the principle and view I announced;
last night. I was in favor of the fed- (
eral amendment.
falls for Action.
''I take that position because.!
reiterating what I have already said.'
I believe this question should be!
promptly settled. 1 see nothing but1
^ j
uanger iu, uur s^uiu^, tu uui uuuj,,
to our proper attitude toward politi-:
i
' a! questions. in continued agitation J
of this subject, and I would take the I
' itf
^9
,on ^
1?vdeQM'HI FOR^HITCHFNQ'!
PA PAH .J JO a LEMON , i
THIM? NO.' VJH
KNIFE! I DON'1
COMMIT
Qgf ^5> 4^
v;r
j
mm r JU5T CAN'T HOLD ON
tmm HAVE SONS VIAY 8ftCK EF
%iM |S?'EMS TO BE NOTHING BE
Mm\ ANO r FORGOT TO RENEW
Hi i r\y Q! IT WHO?
( % v /
afe1 fct IS
*. oru-.'-i -.'Ui ti- ? '
>!! < > I '.it. IiiUt V. C .? e
m :st have a uniform poii y. '1'lu;
<' . ijr ry ini *11 **iiio <)?i v\. lat tbat.
;,<;iicy should be. . . . Aiul, theruiore,
1 believe t'.>at the federal amendment
should be submitted and shouli
be ratified."
a? Mr. Hughes was leaving the
meeting lie was spoken to by 'Airs.
William F. Scott. a leader in the anti
surirage movement ana formerly a
o: the executive board of the
:,ti-suffrage organization >11 New
York State.
"I am sorry, Mr. Huglies?very
sorry, that a man of your sincerity
should support the federal amendment
for woman suffrage." said Mrs.
Scott. "You. sir. will have four generations
of women asainst vou."
' J am sorry madame. that we disagree,"
replied the nominee and he
passed on.
<$><$><$> <8> <?> ?> <^
<$> . > <?
County Campaign Schedule. <&
3> <$
<& $?$><$><?><?><?><$><$
Chappells, Tuesday, August 8tb. ,
Newberry Court House, Friday, Au
gust ntn.
Jalapa, Tuesday, August 15th.
Keitt's Grove, Friday, August 18th.
Little Mountain, Tuesday, August
22nd.
Newberry (West End). Saturday,.
August 26th.
TV> o mt-otinor of pWVvitm iro will hp
A XX V> 1*1/ ' AJk&VAAAAA V ?? MV
gin at 2 p. m. The meeting at West
End wil begin at 8 p. m. All other
meetings will begin at 10:30 a. m.
Frank R. Hunter.
B. B. Leitzsey, Chairman.
Secretary.
<s>
CAMPAIGN SCHEDULE ^
<$> <?
W V ^ vy V -V ^
Florence, Tuesday, August 8.
Marion, "Wednesday, August 9.
Conway, Thursday, (Aoigust 10.
Dillon, Friday, August 11.
Darlington, Saturday, August 12.
Bishopville, Tuesday, August 15.
Bennettsville, Wednesday, Aug. IS.
(Chesterfield, Thursday, August 17.
Camden, Friday, August 18.
Lancaster, Saturday, August 19.
Union, Tuesday, August 22.
Gaffney, Wednesday, August 23.
York, Thursday, August 21.
Chester, Friday, August 25.
Winnsboro. Saturday, August 26.
H?6&
v IliMI
1
Er' fHELP!)
ERE'SMY V J
t W/ilN I ?-| Cj
SUICIDEIJ f
4t ^ 1UIJ
ANOTHER MINUTE, HEMC/5T
1ST TO GET HELP. THERE
'TWEEN HERE AND ETERNilY
IMY ArniDFNT /N5U'?ANC?
JQRRIESVE MOSTIS THAT I
3r:T 50ILEP,r B0RRQW6D I
WfllLNl/T, HE LL GIVE JME g
/xZZ ///!

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