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The herald and news. (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, November 17, 1916, Image 7

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063758/1916-11-17/ed-1/seq-7/

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UNIFORM SERIES OF
m TEXTBOOKS TO
L BE ADOPTED^
W Columbia. Nov. 13-?The South Car-1
W olina state board of education wii!
T adopt a uniform series of textbooks
frvr tho froo Sfhools Of tbS
state at its meeting June 12, 1917.
The adoption will include elementary
and high school texts as required (
by the course of study prescribed for
ieven grades. But not more than 50
per cent of the textbooks now in use
kwill be changed as prescribed by law.
^Publishers and authors of school
Ixtbooks may communicate with each
|f the nine members of the state board
Mf education at win. ah persons aiBectly
or indirectly representing text^book
publishers or dealers desiring to
^Ldo business in South Carolina must
register with the secretary of the state
Aboard upon entering the state or soW
liciting business therein. No registra*
tions will be accepted after June 1.
All bids must be in writing and mutfl
be filed with the state superintendent
k of education not later than June* 1,
m 1917. , !
Beginning June 12, the board will
told public meetings in Columbia to
he&r publishers, authors and agents, i
i
^ XEWBERRY MAX'S LUCKY FIND
Wfil Interest headers of The Herald
" - I
Those taring the misfortune to suf-;
fer from backache, urinary disorders,
gravel, T~opsical swelling, i^eumatic
* pains, or other kidney and bladder j
disorders, will read with gratification
this encouraging statement by a Newberry
man. .
G. W. Switteniburg, grocer, 1109
Boyce St., Newberry,- says: "Hard
work on the tarm weaker, ed my kid- j
neys. I had rheumatic vains all J
through my body and could hardly!
>?And tn nnt mv shoes on. I suffered
intensely from backache and the kid-j
r ney secretions passed too frequently ;
and were scanty and painful. The se-!
cretions also contained a heavy sedi-1
I meut that looked like brick-duet I
\
Lgot a supply of Doan's Kidney Pills at
HT. G. Mayes* Drug Store and the first:
^Kox helped me. I continued taking:
Wt&em until I was cursed."
W 1 50c at all dealers. oFster-Milbum j
Co., Props., Buffalo, N. Y.
NIGHT DELIYEEY
OF INTOXICANTS
i Columbia, Nov. IS.?Attorney Gen
r eral Peeples this afternoon gave oni'
I an opinion which he has rendered in j
irhicn he holds that whiskey may be j
delivered at any time during the day
K or night, so long as it is not contra- i
?and, bu' is brought into the state
in accordance with the gallon-aI
month saw. Whether the delivery!
B shall be during the night or the day.!
I say* the attorney general, the legit*-i
I lacuxe Las not yet said.
The opinion, which is not only of!
I statewide interest, but in view of conf
tests throngnout tne country, is of in- i
fccrest in a number of other states,!
is directed to the chief of police, in!
- ? in f a! I
response lO ms fequesi, ajuu is a.o ,
laws: j
I "In compliance with your verbal re-!
I quest as to wnetner or not a common,'
carrier can deliver whihkey after sun-'
y down will say I can Una no law pro-'
# fcibiting the dtnve* y by a ^jmmon car-j
r rier of a consignment of whiskey be-j
, tween the hours of sundown and sun-!
riset or at such. other time as may be i
convenient, when it is transported in j
accordance with the provisions of the!
gftllon-a-month law.
'It is true that the constitution of
f this state provides, among other
things, that the general assembly]
~for the sale '
WkAil ^JL <1?H W uv iwvvuwv
jA alcoholic beverages between the
hours of sundown and sunrise.
"Section 822 of the criminal code
also provides a penalty for hauling
contraband liQuors in the night timo.}
Section 824 provides a pendflty in case
a common carier transports liquor
unlawfully.
"Other than this, and under the pres- j
eat laws of the state, I know of no I
provision the general assembly has j
sen fit to enact restricting the de-i
? livery of liquors by a common car-;
rier, other Jthan one gallon, to any one
consignment during each calendar
"month. Whether it be during th-3
' ' 1 V.rt n n m! OA
night or aay me legiaiatuic u<*o UVb krv I
aid."
<s> j
" ? FOE ECONOMY'S SAKE ? i
, ;
Use borax! . j
Borax saves 50 per cent, of lauadry j
soap. Borax makes soap do more
work at less expense. It makes bei-'
k"~ n"f!a? irochin?fi
VCX y CClOlti n
\ I
The clothes last longer, too. Borax ;
is absolutely .con-injurious. And its
cost is trifling.
A 25c package of "20 Mule Team ;
Borax Soap Chips" will do more
cleaning than 50c worth of bar soap j
or washing powders.
You are lying so clumsily, said the
observant judge to a litigant, who was
~ statement of his
5 A UUi/ivww ? -
case, that I would advise you to get
a lawyer.?Case and Comment
W Miss Ann Teek has had Iher house
' furnished in- colonial style.
Well, she ought to feel thoroughly
at home amid such surroundings.?
Philadelphia Ledger.
"I DON'T SUFFER
ANYMORE"
"Feel Like a New Person,"
says Mrs. Hamilton.
I
i i
New Castle, Ind.?"From the time I
I was eleven years old until I was seven- j
teen I suffered each
j IIPPH j month so I had to be
kmS&m I *n ^e<^' * head-!
| j ache, backache and
I I suc^ Pa*ns * w<>uld
| | cramp double every :
month. I did not;
IHMSi know what it was j
ia.1 uc coey a uuuutc. ;
me any good. A i
neighbor told my mother about Lydia j
E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound and
I took it, and now I feel like a nevr ;
person. I don't suffer any more and I!
am regular every month."?Mrs. Hazel |
Hamilton, 822 South 15th St
When a remedy has lived for forty j
years, steadily growing in popularity
and influence, and * thousands upon i
thousands of women declare they owe
their health to it, is it not reasona- i
ble to believe that it is an article of
great merit?
If you want special advice write
to Lydia E. Pinkham Medicinej
Uo. (contiaentiaij, i^ynn, mass. <
Tour letter will be opened, read
and answered by a woman and
held in strict confidence.
FIFTH UNITED STATES CIVIL
DISRICT, OFFICE OF THE
SECRETARY, ATLANTA, GA.
i
November 7, 1916.!
The United States Civil-Service
Commission announces the following
examinations to b? held during the
months of November and December,!
1916. Application blanks and addi-;
tional information may be obtainedi
from the secretary, local civil-service:
!
board at any first or second class
post-office, or from the secretary, fifth j
civil-service district, Atlanta, Georgia, j
Trade Commission-r. Bureau of For-j
eign and Domestic Commerce, November
22, 1916. Salary $10 a day and j
expenses. Knowledge of a foreign!
language and experience in the sale,
of lumber required. 'Announcement j
and application form 375 will be sent
on request.
Associate Ceramic Chemist, December
5, 1916, salary $2,000-$2,500. Vacancies
at Pittsburgh, Pa., and else-j
where. Competitors not assembled
for examination. Rated oij education, j
training, experience and thesis. Three j
\ps?r<s pnllpco training in owamif pii- i
gingering and 5 years in ceramic plants
required. Age, under 45 years. Application
form, 2118.
Technologist in Sugar-Beet Seed
Production, December o, 1916, salary
$2,100-$2,500 a year. Vacancies in the
department of agriculture. Competitors
not assembled. Rated on education,
training, experience and thesis.
Graduation from college and five years
experience in plant breeding required.
Age SO to 45 years. Application
Form 2118.
Assistant in Tobacco Investigations,!
December 6, 1916, salary $840-$l,200. j
'Vacancies in the department of agri
culture. One years experience in!
growing, curing and handling tobac- j
co' required.* Age, 20-45. Form 1312.!
Aid (Male), December 6-7, 1916, sa-,
lary $600 to $720 per ailnum. Vacan-i
cies in the Department of Commerce.]
Qualified persons urged to enter this
examination. Graduation from a tech- i
meal or scientific scnool or the equiv-:
alent required. Age, 19 to 24 years, j
Application Form lolZ.
Food and Drug Inspector, (Male),|
December 6-7, 1916, salary $1,400 to1
jo ?uenqj?d9a nj sapuuoBAi -Qoo'zt!
Agriculture. \Age 20 to 45 years. An-.
nouncement with full information and
application form, 1312, on request, j
Junior Explosives Engineer, December
6-7, lbI3, salary $1,200 to $1,500.
Vacancies in bureau of mines. Graduation
from "technical school and
three years -experience with mines or
in the manufacture, testing, and use
of explosives required. Age 21 to 45.
Application Form, 1312.
Assistant Engineer Inspector of
Weights and Measures, December 1314,
1916, salary $1,000 to $1,600. Va
cancie? in department commerce. Ap-1
plicants must be graduates or senior
students in mechanical civil or electrical
engineering. Age, 20 to 35.
Application Form, 1312..
Stenographer and Typewriter, Field
Service, December 5, 1916, usual entrance
salaries range from $900 to!
$1,000. Vacancies in Alabama, Flori- j
da, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina,
and Tennessee. Men especiaHy;
are urged to apply as the supply of
eligibles has not b?en equal to the
ciemana. (jnances ior appomimeni are
excellent. Age, IS years or over. Form
1424 and application Form 3371 upon
request.
A Chicago woman recently burst into ^
tears when her husband voluntarily
gave her a twenty-dollar bill. We,
know women who would pass out in-j
stantly if such a thing were to happen
to them Tampa Times.
I certainly do feel sorry for Mrs.
Doppel.
IWhy bo?
She -natronizes "Mrs Dribson- when
ever she gets a chance, but Mrs. Dub- j
son is blissfully unconscious of it, soi
it's no satisfaction to her at all.?
Judge.
51 AY AGREE I'POX WITHDRAWAL I
OF TROOPS FROM MEXICO1
Atlantic City, Nov. 13.?After tiiej
conference today of the Mexican- j
American joint commission, it was in
timated that an agreement providing
for the withdrawal of the American
punitive expedition might be reached
before the clos* of the wrek.
Luis Cabrera, chairman of the Mexican
-commission, ss.d he believed a
settlement would be reached within a
few days. He went to Philadelphia:
again late today, where it is under- j
stood he will confer with Rafael Nie- i
to. snb-S;'crptary of the Department of j
Finance of Mexico, of which Mr. Cab-j
rera is the head.
Mr. Cabrera announced to the Amer- j
ican commissioners that GVn. Carranza J
had extended to January 14 the time j
Hvnn mine owners for reopening their j
o - _ _
properties. j
In the eve-t of an a^rrment being]
formed for the withdrawal of the
American troops, it probably will not j
stipulate t_hat they be brought out of j
Mexico immediately, hut that they b-1
recalled within a reasonable time, perhaps
within sixty or ninety days. It
is believed that the withdrawal at any
time will be made subject to conditions
at that time.
That Gen. Carranza is sincere in hi3
efforts to drive Villa and his followers
from the field is not doubted by the
American commissioners, altftougn;
they have been keenly interested in i
what apparently was the inability o!
the present Mexican army to accomplish
that purpose. News today that
Gen. Murgia had ben selected to sue- j
ceed Gen. Jacinto Trevino in charge
of operation in the north was received
by the Americans as further
evidence of Carranza's determination
to force the campaign against his
northern enemies. |
To Overcome Yilla. I
El Paso, Nov. 13.?Andres Garcia, inspector
general of Carranza consulates
in the United States, declared tonight
that the present movement of Carranza
forces into the State of Chihuahua
~ i Al? j ^
had no other sienmcance man rue uetermination
of the Oarranza government
to pursue and overcome Villa
and his bandits.
"The reports in army circles in El
Paso that those troons were hems:
brought north to enfofcp anv demand
that might be made for the withdrawal
of the American expeditionary forces;
from Mexico is without foundation."
[i Worn Out? |
No doubt you are, if
you suffer from any of the g ?
numerous ailments to K 8j
|yj which ail women are sub
ajeci. neauatuc, uai^- kjw i
ache, sideache, nervous- ?V1 i
ness, weak, tired feeling, |?^
are some of the sympj|%
toms, and you must rid grig
yourself of them in order a ?
to feel well. Thousands
of. women, who have
B B been benefited by this j
g ff remedy, urge you to
11 TAKE ||
?! vm uui n
The Woman's Tonic if
Mrs. Sylvania Woods, g g
of Clifton Mills, Ky., says:
"Before taking C a r d u i,
I was, at times, so weak I
could hardly walk, and
the $aiii in my back and raj
head nearly killed me. 1^
After taking three bottles yA
of Cardui, the pains dis- 11
appeared. Now I feel as
well as I ever did. Every
suffering woman should 1?
Htry CarduL" Getabottle
today. E-68
"THE FLOWEB OF
NO MAN'S LAND"
"The Flower of No Man's Land'' is
the captivating title of the first MetroColumbia
feature photo-play presenting
to Metro patrons that winsome little
star, Viola Dana. John J. Collins
*? ?-si iu:.
nas written ana airecuiu mis u?auuful
production especially for Miss
Dana. It brings into vivid contrast
the arid wastes of the rGeat
American Desert and the simplicity
of far-Western ways, and the sophisticated,
complex existence of the boxholders
in the "Diamond Horse-shoe"
at the Metropolitan Opera House.
Miss Dana bas no superior in the
portrayal of emotion, and as "The.
Flower of Xo Man's Land ' she has every
opportunity to display this power,
for fate plays strange pranks with
the confiding, simple child of the mining
camp. But the little star's "power
to show the humorous side of life
is just as great, and thore are many
scenes which will keep the audience
in an uproar.
Kahoma, an Indian, finds in the
heart of the desert. Baby Echo, lying
by the side of her murdered father.
He brings her up tenderly and she
becomes-the one bright spot in the
lives of the rough men of the mining
camp.
Roy Talbert, reigning teor of the
grand opera, loses his voice during
a triumph in "Pagliacci." He goes
West to recuperate. How1 he wins the
simple heart of Echo to the deep sorrow
of Big Bill, who loves her, how
h.e shows his desirable nature* and
ihow his very villiany is the means of
winning back freedom and liappiness
to the little "Flower of No Man's
Land" is shown In this colorful ro
l sijiilill '1''^ '
| If! if} I Pride Without
jjjjHjj j Extravagance!
| ill 111; You will be proud of
i;i j your Maxwell. You
in liiiii^v ^ will Wnowthat it comna
f. v * ,
neighbor s car. Y our i
with the unusual comfc
you the service you wa
you own such a car without
money. In first cost and in
economy that is amazing.
D EDUCED price?but wi
* * It's a better?more satis
price. Ihe new advantagi
/\\ shield, Larger and More Con
Hyf I Springs and a New Dash Lam
| m j j these to the Electric Starter a
I ( equipment and you must adn
l II III I I ( i r* .?\/ol??
VjICCUCSl IV1ULU1 vcu T UJUV/.
> CAROLINA.
P
|V. Newbarr}
mance of East and West. The love DAYLIGHT SAVIJH
arrow that is the gift of old Kahoma, PU
brings sorrow- at first, but tears are
changed to rejoicing. There is a sim- j xew York Nov 1
plicity a directness about this exauis-1 road3 ^ be aske
ite production that will carry its messa?<j
straight to the heart of every sayinS committee to
person who views it. in putting into effec
Opera House Thursday 23rd. proposed plan to ti
ward one hour in tl
announced here todj
Polly?Jack Dashaway is always
making love to a different girl. A national daylig
Dolly?Yes; that fellow is as fickle tion will be held he
as a last year's hammock rope.?Life. 31 next and' the. <
Vo
May be secured t
of the largest and la
which expires Satut
10 P. M.
During this period
in subscriptions to T
will count for 100,0
and above the regul;
subscriptions will co
5,000 extra votes will be is;
subscription to The Herald and '
13th and Saturday Oct. 18th. J
on this offer. Also allsubscripti
will apply on this offer of 100,01
Not Too Lat
Herald ai
Campaign
Call, Phone or Write
PHONI
' ' ' - - - ' 'v! .'l-, &sM i .
i 1 \ | I i | 11 ji I I {I I !| ! J jj | ; i 11 i : ^ )
ii I lliil III 111 11
|i; !|| l|i
F. O. B. DETROIT
i ; i ;
res favorably with your t j | |;
amily will t>e delighted j ' ji
)rt. The car will give !j
W | |
mt over all roads. And
wasting one penny of your i<
upkeep the Maxwell offers j
Figure it up for yourself.
ith four new improvements. ;
jfactory Maxwell for a lower
1 \V7* 1 S?L /SN^J li
gs are: overlapping wma- II
lfortable Seats, Longer Rear
ip and Gasoline Gauge. Add \
md other regular features of / j
lit the Maxwell is the World's \ /
M''
AUTO CO. !|
s. c. I
? ? I I I I ? I I I I I ? I '
} meanwhile will confer with railway
LflT IS PROPOSED presidents.
The subject will be considered
4.?American rail- , . ? .
, , the American Railway association mi
q by the dayllgiit . . , ^
.... ith semi-annual meeting here tomortake
the initiative , ,
row. A committee will recommend
t next summer tne . , .. ,, . .
, __ fV,a TrtT. that, while the railroads should ao*
lrn the cIock iorlis
country, it was antagonize the movement, they shoatl
lv. ~ not agree to the plan "until it nas Deeit
previously adopted by the principal
ht saving conven- business and municipal centers, tare
January 30 and gether with the state and local
committee In the thorities."
inds of
tes
>y taking advantage
t
st extra vote offer
day, Oct. 18th, at
I ??iTe>-r\T /?1iiK rvf $ 1 2
V V V Vi J VA N/A T ? ? ?
he Herald & News
>00 extra votes over
ar scale. All classes J
>unt on this offer. \
i
sued on each yearly renewal '
News between Monday Oct.
i 11 Unrtlr /?n1lpnfmiic will r?mmf
\il UAWA. WV/11W lilV/Uk; ? m w v
ons turned in during this period
00 extra votes on each $ 12 club.
:e To Enter
id News I
Manager
: for Full Particulars
S 234

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