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The herald and news. (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, May 19, 1922, Image 3

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063758/1922-05-19/ed-1/seq-3/

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JEWELS BURIED SEVEN YEARS
\ French Oeunless Recovers Treasure
V Which She Had Long Since
Given Up as Lost.
Treasure trove to the value of
!>X> francs lias been unearthed I>y
gardeners who were making a new
path outside the Dauphine site of the
j Bois de Boulogne. One of tl.em. engaged
in removing an overgrown lilac
bush, suddenly shouted that he had
found a handful of pearls, and when
his companions joined him and more
soil was turned up. a small heap of
jewels was revealed, lying hardly more
than a foot below the surface. Alto?*?ther
11 pearls were recovered, in $-1d'-fhrn
to a very large one set In diamonds
and a sapphire diamond bracef
let fron: which two sapphires are missing.
The police found the owner within
a few hours, according to the Montreni
Herald. She is the Countess de
Beauregard, and it i* more than seven
years since she lost them. She says
that on August 2, when war was declared,
she went to the safe containk
Ing her jewels to prepare it for removal
to the bank, but found several
I? cases open and empty, though a dia^
mond tiara and other valuable articles
Ptill remained. The police suspected
her German chambermaid and sevfTal
times visited her in the segregation
camp to which she was removed, in
order to obtain admissions. After
peace was signed this woman, however.
was sent to Germany, and the
countess lost all hope of recovering
her jewels. The pearls belonged to
a necklace of 150. and the view is
that the thieves visited the hiding
place from time to time as they wanted
money.
MODERN LIFE IN OLD CITY
Change# in Bagdad Might Well Cause
Caliphs to Turn Over in Their
Gorgeous Tombs.
A Bagdad, the city of caliphs, the
scene of the deeds of the good Harun
al-Rashid of "Arabian Nights" fame,
W Is now enjoying the strangest sights
A In its 1,300 years of history. The
jfe British have brought the Strand to
9 its bazaars, the motorboat to the Ti,
I fris and the automobile to its time-.
! eaten gates.
Bagdad enjoys an English weekly
magazine, published in English and
Arabic, including some of the latest
brand of British humor and excellent
portraits of the leading muezzins and
sheifes. There are a number of British
banks doing business in the city,
branches of great Institutions famous
the world over.
British hotels are there offering
roast beef and Yorkshire pudding with
ale and stout to wash them down.
They have Turkish baths, billiard
r rooms, palm gardens: and are furnished
with English furniture throughout.
British <stO?g? sell perfumery, novels,
clothing for male and female of the
latest styles of London and Paris. One
leading department store in the old,
city advertises: "What you may not j
get In other stores in Bagdad you
can get in ours," says the Wall Street
k Journal. *
k One may soon see some lordly son
of the desert driving in his flivver to
the local hotel to partake of the J
roast beef and ale of old England, j
' Selah!
^ Circus Tent Stakes Driven by Power.
' The automobile truck has largely
superseded the horse as a means of
transportation for the itinerant circus.
It has also relegated the uselessness
of the former sledge-swinging
^ skill of the canvasman.
INOW IDe SIllKCJ* ivr ujc {\**r
W not driven by hand, but by a truck
m built especially for that purpose. It
I carries the stakes and the tent poles
and is equipped with a miniature
I piledriver of the modern automatic
type, operated by a belt from the
truck's engine. All the canvasmen
have to do is to hold the stakes under
the hammer of the driver until
they are started into the ground.?
Exchange.
Schooi Laws in Various States.
Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts,
New Hampshire, Ohio, Oklahoma.
North Dakota. West Virginia,
"Louisiana and Florida d:> not accept
certificates granted by other states
' Many of these, however, issue othei
certificates on the basis of recogn;zec
ciedentials, provided the reqi irt*
ments are met. Connecticut fl* the!
only state which issues certificates i
wholly on the basis of examination,
and does not accept credits from institutions
either within or without tinstate.
Queer Taste Accounted For.
Coming itame from a p:\rtv late on?
bright moonlight night. 1 did not light
a lamp on entering the house. F?ei
ing hungry, I went to the pantry for
a lunch. Taking a slice of bread. I
spread it with what I supposed to he
plum marmalade. Proceeding t<> the
" kitchen. I took a bite of my sandwich
to find it did not Taste like tlio^e my
mother puts up In my school lunch.
Lighting a lamp I discovered I had
used soft soap instead of marmalade.
?Chicago Journal.
Antarctic Discoveries.
J. L. Cope, the explorer, returnee
to Plymouth. Kngland. a year ahead ol
schedule: he had discovered extensive
workable mineral deposit* and gainec
valuable knowledge relating to fi^h
eries, including 'he secret migrating
place of whales. After exploiting tlies*
inds he plans to go back, taking t::a
wife with him. in which case she wil
be i!*.e 5rst woman to set foot on th< !
antarctic continent.?Scientific Awtr j
iC&A*
! PICTURE HUNG BY "SPOOKS"
I Pajected Portrait Appears Mysteriously
on Walls of Salon in Big
New York Hotel. j
A phenomenon, as startling and
J mysterious to the. officers and directors
> of the Society of Independent Artists
j as we're the recent ghostly manifesta|
tions in Artigonish to the MacDonalds
j and Pr. Walter Franklin Prince, was
i revealed at the artists' exhibition on
the top iloor of the Waldorf.
The New York spirit nailed a rejected
drawing to a wall, and above It
hammered four tacks in a card which
told that ilio picture was the work
of Mrs. Emina Mabpl Field of Chicago,
and was called "Impressionistic Personality
Portrait of Miss Edith Bennett."
" ?? : j * CI
"MpooKS or no spooks, --v. o.
Baylinson. a director and secretary
of the society, "that picture has got
to come down. No one gave Mrs. Field
permission to have it exhibited, and
our walls aren't open for spirits." A
special delivery letter from the artist
to Mr. Baylinson, arrived a few* days
later.
"I am starting for home now," he
ietrer says, "and will be under way
before this letter is mailed. And I beg
to inform you that I have left the matter
entirely in the hands of my guide,
who has assured me that my poor
little picture will be exhibited there
whether you wish it or not."?New
York Times.
BITS OF JUVENILE WISDOM
Brief Extracts Purported to Have
Been Taken From Essays of New
York School Children. j
The king of a government which
does everything he says is- an absolute
monkey.
Polygamy is having more wives than
yon can support.
There are three kinds of races,
black, white, and the shades in between.
There are three vowels. I. O. U.
A sextant is a man who buries you
at sea.
People used to write with feathers
I which were called non de plumes.
Julius Caesar was one of the brides
of March.
Savages are people who don't know
what wrong is until missionaries
show them.
A prehistoric animal is a funny kind
of animal that is dead.
A nomad is a person who never
gets mad.
Columbus knew the world wa3
round because Le made an egg stand
up.
Ghosts which you see are no such
thing.
The study of geography is important,
because if it wasn't for geogi
ranhv we wouldn't know where we
| lived.?New York Mail.
Very Painful Dentistry.
Dwight Crittenden claims the distinction
of being the first white man
to have a tooth drawn by one of the
colored doctors of the African Transvaal.
The father of this well-known
actor was a mining engineer in Kimberley.
While a hoy in South Africa
shooting pains indicated that a molar
must be extracted, and as Dwight Crittenden's
father's mines were situated
far from medical aid, one of the medicine
men was summoned, and after
performing a fantastic war dance to
the tom-tom, this gentleman extracted
the offending molar with the aid of a
pair of engineer's pincers. An anesthetic
was administered in the form of
native incense, but Dwight contends
that it only served to intensify tbe
agony.
To Take Census of Bees.
A census of the bees in a hive has
| been made possible by a clever devirp
invpnred bv an emolovee of the
j bureau of entomology.
The invention consists of a gate to
be placed at the entrance to a bee
hive with a series of telephone message
registers attached in such a way
that every time a bee goes through
the gate its passage is recorded. The
device is operated electrically by alternating
current.
As about 300,000 bees go out during
the day, on honey-gathering expeditions,
considerable electrical energy
Is needed to operate the recording
gate, though the amount of energy expended
by the device each time a bee
passes is infinitesimal.
A Willing Spirit.
An old, crippled colored man recently
knocked at the door of a Xoith
side residence and asked for work, relates
the Indianapolis News. Having
no work she thought he could do, the
woman of the house answered in the
negative, but she gave him his breakfast
instead. When he handed bock
his dishes she espied a check in the
empty coffee cup and asked the meaning
of it, and he said: "Just show it
to the mister." It developed that it
was a canceled check of the vintage
*of 'lt>. The housewife accepted it in
the spirit it was intended and sent
the old fellow happily on his way.
Shipping Cases for Rubber.
A new case for shipping sheet rubber
has been introduced into Singapore
shipping circles by an American
firm. These reach local exporters in
the form of sheets made of KX) per
cent fiber, the riveting, packing and
wiring being done by the shippers. The
thinness of the sheets enables the
cases built from them to hold from
V2 to 25 per cent more weight of rubber
than the old wooden boxes, nnd
the 2(?iT construction is practically unj
breakable, very cleanly and water!
proof.?Scientific American.
THERE IS A LITT1.E HOUSB
The liule house! It is so small
I have not found it yet at all, ,
j And ar; ypar follow:-; patient year,
(Btrange town? of countries far and netL9,
Return the answer: "Nay. not here!'* * !
i And yet 1 know the lamplight fails
f Caressingly upon its walls.
And I would touch th?-*m if I could,
* To know if they are stone or wood.
There is a chair for you, and there
The light falls golden on your hair.
But?with yevr graying lips unkissed
The spiral shadows coil and twist
About you as you turn to mist.
Our little hous?! Its window panes
Stung by a thousand passionate raiin
Are blind with ivy, and the moss
Creeps on the sill that we must croeiv
It would not be so hard to wait.
If I were sure about the gate.
A broken latch were trivial now,
To dazzled eyes, that marveled how
The sunrise rested on your brow.
But dawn is terrible unless
Love soothes its awful loveliness.
Ah, love, what tierce dawns storm and
%dare
The* little hoi se that waits somewhere!
?Mary Brent Whiteside, in Leslie's
Weekly.
SHRINE LOOTED OF TREASURE
Russia's. Soviet Government Has Appropriated
Riches of Famous .
Church of Saint Sergius.
St. Ser*rius' treasure of $800,000,000
has disappeared. Red soldiers now
use as a barricade the buildings of
whnt was once regarded as the richest
and most famous convent of all
the Russians save, possibly, that at
Kiev. There are but tive monks left
In the monastery. Fifteen others have
removed a mile and a half distant to
the Church of Gethsemane, at Chernigovskaya
where they have founded a
humble community and till the soil.
The other monks who lived at this vast
religious mecca. to which yearly went
100,000 pilgrims, have been scattered.
There are but few pilgrims now to
pray before the ikon of St. Sergius,
the miraculous powers of which was
supposed by Russians to have saved
the monastery from destruction by the
French army of invasion in 1812. The
very jewels of the open silver sarcophagus
of St. Sergius have been reI
moved or replaced with false ones. It
Is claimed. Many of the vast treasure
of church vessels, mitres and croziers.
made of solid gold and Inlaid with
precious s*:ones of immense value are
missing. It is claimed that the loot
from the monastery equaled in value
the treasure of gold and silver and
precious stones of St. Peter's. Rome.
The monastery is now dassed as a national
soviet museum and no services
are held within the church.
. ? TM.
A CREDIT RATING
Mr. Everbroke: 1 want a good
diamond ring on credit. I've just
become engaged to the rich Miss
Goldenbonds."
The Jeweler: J am sorry to have
to refuse you. Our credit man re
ports that it's difficult to get Miss
Goldenbonds to return her engagement
rings. Call and see us when
you need wfeddlng rings. v$ Thirty
days time?five per cent, off for
casru .
Piano Box Shoe Store.
Have you ever been in an oil botan
town? The hope of striking oil is as
?reat an excitement as the finding of
gold in '49. From the preliminary
leasing of the land, the promotion of stock,
to the setting up of a drill it has
all the glamor and glory of speculation.
Once oil is hit, the gusher opens
up not only wealth fo: the prospector,
but some measure of opportunity 'for
the alert merchant. In, the Arkansas
fields' almost overnight a line of stores
appeared. They were nothing more
than shanties at the best, but the shoe
store took the prize of the entire
main street. It consisted of four piano
boxes containing the best grade boots
and the best calfskin shoes at a price
reminiscent of the war period.?Boot
and Shoe Recorder.
New York Woman's Fool Idea.
Because she dyed her cat a beautiful
blue to harmonize with the furniture
of her apartment, a young woman in
New York, who says she is a singer,
was arrested on a cruelty charge by
the Humane society. A probation officer
who was sent to investigate the
case told the magistrate that the singer
had a three-room apartment all done in
Alice blue and had an Alice blue wardciio
iviinrpfl Otto to hp of the
ll/UC. n v vv- ? - ~ ?
same shade and so dipped him. Two |
other cats that she had dyed had been 1
poisoned by licking off The dye. The
magistrate gave her a suspended sentence
and ordered the Humane society
to keep the cat until its soft fur Is
once more clean and there is no further
danger to its health.
Easy to Start.
"I notice that some young women
have started a movement to teqch the
young men of their town how to talk
when paying a call."
"A waste <?f time."
"Eh r
"All that Is necessary when the young
chap g*ts his hat parked and himself
cm tori on the edcre of a chair is to say,
'Oh, Aiisustup,* Montmorency, Percha),
or whatever I,-is ii;mtp luippens to be,
'do tei! me :'.'H>ut yourself 1' "?Blrmlng*
bam A^-lIeruld. v
I
A year ago
almost ui
Today ? a
A sweepii
g%
Will F
pound tt
weighing
over.
W/
940 Main 5
Cows
HOP
I I II.LJ
AccoVdi
of theg tc
Cows wil
the Side1
at any til
THE NEW COMMERCIAi
BANK BUILDi;
This City Soon to Se<
Hand?ome Bank Buildin;
Midst" of Business I"
Plans and specifications
completed and the advertis
on for bids for the contra(
for the new Commercial I
ing in Newberry. The ol
at the corner of Caldwell
--.(-..n/ifc! tjm'11 Ka rpmnHpllp
Oli CCtO T> in ^
new banking house, whic
another adornment to the
old building now occup
hank officials with their i
money will be sold wher
and their "commercial''
"move across." The buildi
completed and the ball
about the first of S^pten
contracts for the vaults ha
been let to the Mosler Saf
of Toledo, Ohio.
The vaults will be model
respect and built with a s]
of absolute safety. The:
three, namely, a cash
Mosley screw door in the
book and safety deposit vj
storage vault in the baser
bank equipments will also
in all respects. There wil
tomers' room, where the f
customers of the 'bank m
place to meet and consu
will also be a separate a
room for ho women, to ha
-r -: tip* r*.
ig verdict for QUALITY
& Chickens
/ anted
>ay 35 cents per
lis week for fryers
r? 1 1 O ?<ok ^ 11 ??? #J r% jr% m
; l puuiiuj) auu
It Newberry, S. C.
i t
*Mmwwmnwumn^*me i n >1 i ii' m nil i i r niiwn11?> ...
on Sidewalks
' . I t
( ?
ng to an ordinance j
>wn of ; Newberry,
1 not be allowed on
walks of the town
> '' ' * * ' -
lie.
S. C. McCarley
Chief of Police
I I I I ? || I I ??II I ? I I I ?III I I _ I I I P
L ' [ant and agreeable place to rest while
NG HERE jn the cjty, and where, if necessary,
' they can deposit their babies and get
e Another
? "in the j c^iec':s therefor when they go tradlouses
i in? or to attend to other duties. Both
of these rooms, as well as the bank
have been j itself, will have all modern appliances
>ing is now jfor convenience and comfort. In the
:t to be let banking room proper the second
>ank build- ( floor will be removed so as to have a
id building. one-floor effect, thereby assuring
and Boyce ; proper light and ventilation.
d for the j "We are sure this will be hailed
-h will be j w.;th delight by the many customercity.
The friends of the growing and expanding
ied oy the Commercial bank, and they will all
ixings and take the greatest pleasure in realizl
the men 1 ing by this move that this institution
belongings has been s0 P?Pularly successful as
. , , ' to be able to get into bigger, better
nor 1R tft nft ? . .
. , t, , I and more financially stronger quark
installed. ... , .
iber The s' w"ere t"ere W1" ^ greaater
already ' ^ac^^es anc* opportunities to in10
\ i crease the bank's usefulness in helpe
company j ^ pUSfo forward for Newberry's
i brighter future in the onward march
:n m every . , , ,
. of progress and advancement. i
fecial view i ^
re will be Visitors to Newberry
vault with j Greenwood Index-Journal.
interior, a; JVliss Lucille Harvey, Miss Olive
ault, and a ^ i?uck, William Keith, Harold Lumnent.
The j leJ% w A. Huey, J. W. Duckett, J.
be modern rp Duckett, McCall Marshahll, Earle
! be a cus-. Wharton, Robert Pitts, Earle Wharriends
and fon an(j Lesl;e Milling were among
ay have a thogg who witnessed the Clemson- j
lit. There dewberry game in Newberry Friday!
r,d distinct (afternoon.
ve a pleas-! mu . ;
%
)
I
?
The Bugs a
Before they!
i
t
Slug Shot
, Paris
Gre
; ' * f "rfArsenate
1
/ V"Stone
cypher:
Climax Flowei
\
. 1. 1 I
' v1 '.. -.1 ' i
* . > ; ' * v*;
V>.;.- * \ '::
*?
S j v A , r >
IIII? V ' fftf
: . ? f - ?
' ' !
i ' '
Hnn't Qnoi
1/VIJ t upai
in time of sic
medicine mu
get well agaii
depend upor
the medicine
Bring your d
tion here and
what his orde
up of the pui
drugs, with c
and skill, yet
reasonably, f
Mayes I
Newberry,
Member Newborrjr
? \
I
V.
-.J *
lill
nd "Wurrums"
' ; ' *r ' } $- J/:S' ^;F-f- ^ *
Kill Your Garden
JSE
J . ?
t
' > ?
* r*T
4 V
, i
i * 14
; v>J
en . .
Lead > \1
> Bug Killer
? IV-*;,.. <>
r, Spray etc.
'' ~ ' " "" """
re the Spoon
kness. Doses of Jj
ist be taken to 1
n, but a lot will J
-i is r
i tne quauiy or ;
0 \ ^$1
the spoon holds.
' s '
octor's prescript
1 H 'flB
you will get just
\r *>jS]
;r calls for, made
est and freshest . ]
onsurnmate care
i
charged for most ' |
'rompt service. |
Drug Store I
South Carolina
"W hM
Chamber of Commerce
jfl^E

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