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The herald and news. (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, August 25, 1922, Image 1

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VOLUME LVIIi, NUMBER 68. j| |? ? y ? , ,> ^ NEWBERRY, S. C., FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1S22. TWICE A WEEK, $2.00 A YEAR
THE COUNTY CAMPAIGN
DRAWS TO A CLOSE
The Candidates All Present Their
Claims and Speak of Their Records?All
Favor Economy,
Roads and Schools
The county campaign is going
along nicely. The meetings are. fair?y
well attended, good barbecues are
being served, fine lemonade is being
sold and the candidates are conducting
their campaigns in a friendly
way. The meetings so far held have
been at Young's Grove, Keitt's, Pitts,
Pomaria, Whitmire, Moilohon and
Silverstreet.
It was our pleasure to attend the
Silverstreet meeting on Tuesday.
We have not been able to get to the
other meetings except the first at
Young's Grove. The Silverstreet
meeting was composed of an audience,
not^very large, but very attentive
to what the candidates had to
say. All of the speakers received
applause. County Chairman Wheeler
presided. The candidates for the
House of Representatives spoke first.
Mr. W. R. Watson was the firsi to
address the voters. He told of his
work as a banker for many years at
Whitmire and of his close contact
with the farmers of that section. He
said he had few promises to make;
tnat tms was nis nrst entry in puntics;
that he knew nothing about the
legislature from experience, but that
"he felt that he could learn. He stood
for liberal, but not extravagant appropriations
for the state institutions
of learning. He thought the state
and county should be conducted
a good business man would conduct
his own business; he favored good
roa?43 and schools.
The next speaker, Mr. W. M. Wilson,
spoke of his experiences in the
days of 187G; related his business
qualifications and his life as a farmer,
stock dealer and intendant of
Peaks. He said that certain taxes
could not be reduced, namely, taxes
to pay for the .bonds that had been
voted for better roads; that the people
had voted these bonds and would
have to pay them. He promised to do
the bert he could and felt that he was
fitted for the office he sought. Favored
economy in all appropriations.
Mr. Eugene S. Blease thanked the
voters for having chosen him last
year to fill the vacancy caused by the
death of Hon. Geo. S. Mower. Said
that it took time to do things in the
legislature and explained fully how
the general assembly was composed
and how it worked in the passage and
repeal of laws. His promises for the
future could be best made by telling
what he had done and tried to do in
the past session. He recounted his
services on the Judiciary committee,
one of the two most important committees
in the house. Pointed out
that through his work, in cooperation
with other members, has reduced the
appropriation bill of the state more
than $695,000; reduced the state tax
levy mere than one-third; reduced
the county tax levy one-half mill even
when the delegation had put in
one mill for the building of good
roads. He pointed out a list of over
.'50 officers' salaries which had been
reduced by conference committee
of which he was a member. Told of
his starting the fight for the appro
priations for the coo try and cotton
mill schools when it appeared that
many of these schools would fiave to
be closed. He fought all new appropriations
and tried to reduce old
ones. Especially did he oppose the
$6,000 for the boat for the state
game warden which had been mentioned
in the campaign. He voted
and spoke against the legislature
meeting on Sunday and thought ihe
fight of last session on that question
meant that there would be no Si. bath
legislation next year. H" would
continue his fight to reduce taxation
and lift the burden from those m>t
ahlo to hear it.
Mr. W. B. Boirest, the next speaker,
said he was a farmer and would
stand for the interests of the farmers
and all the people, as best he
could, if he should be elected. Spoke
of his service in the house of representatives
some years ago. He had
stood for economy at that time and
would do so again. He was
against useless officers and extravagant
appropriations. He favored
good roads and good schools and
would do the best he could to obtain
' MOONLIGHT PICNIC AT
HENDERSON'S PASTURE
j A delightful social affair was the
J moonlight picnic given by Mr. and
! Mrs. J. B. Harmon in honor of their
! guests, Mrs. M. V. Dodgen and Mr.
and Mrs. A. C. Tysinger of Charlotte,
1 i
! X. C., at Henderson's pasture.
The evening was spent in playing
outdoor games and singing. Mr. and |
j ]
j Mrs. Tysinger sang a comical song,
, I
I "Chicken.'' Then lunch was served ;
i which was followed by a watermelon ;
I . !
1 cutting.
Woman's College Alumnae
] The Newberry division of the Due
J West Woman's College Alumnae as-j
soeiatior. will meet with Mrs. J. W.
Carson on Tuesday afternoon, Augj
use 29, at 4 o'clock. All alumnae
i and former students of ihe college :
: are most cordially invited to be pres:
ent at the meeting.
| them. He thought taxes were too
high and there should be reductions,
j The next speaker, Mr. H. H. Evujis,
also favored economy. He told
of his services of several years in the
' house of representatives. He explained
fully to his audience how the
general assembly worked on Sunday
and called it Saturday, by having the
sergeant-at-arms of the bodies to
turn back the clocks when the hands
were geting ready to point to twelve
.o'clock Saturday night. He favored
appropriations for the common j
schools and for good roads. He explained
to his hearers how the legislature
did its work and told of his be- i
ing chairman of the railroad committee
when he was last a member.
! He spoke of the depression of the
farmers and of his sufferings as one
of them ana promised to try to aid
them.
Dr. J. W. Folk spoke of having opposed
woman suffrage but now that
it was upon us he welcomed the new
voters. He paid a glowing tribute
to women. Said ho had three sons
and each of these three sons had ten
sisters. The audience went to figuring
how many children the speaker
had. He spoke against the legislature
holding meetings on Sunday and
pointed to passages in the B":le
against it. He told of his services in
getting the roads of Newberry county
built and the streets of the town
of Newberry paved. He also told of
how he had worked in the legislature
fcr the little country schools. He was
.1 *? Knf favr.rnfl
oppusfu IVJ KIAV.7 ^ i,
taxes for schools and roads. Said
the voters must vote for three men
for the house and scratch out the
names of four and begged them to
rot scratch his name.
I Dr. Euston X. Kibler, present representative.
was the last speaker for
the house. He argued in behalf of
cooperation among all our people in
the present stress and pointed out
how this was necessary if we were
to have good schools and good roads
and all the other things necessary
for the comfort and happiness of the
people. He said that a man could
not learn everything in th'j legislature
in one term; that it took time
to get acquainted with the members,
to learn how to do the work there;
that he felt now more able to really
represent the people than he was
when he was elected two years ago.
He had voted for the house to adjourn
over from Sunday to Monday,
lie had voted for the common .schools
and had opposed extravagant and unnecessary
appropriation? and useless
offices and officers. He promised to
render the best service he could. He
was thankful that he had been honored
in the past and would appreciate
reelection.
The candidates for magistrate,
Messrs. .J. H. Chappel!. ('. \Y. Douglas.
W. H. Graddick. W. S. Jones and
E. I.. Rodelsperger, made brief statements.
All of them spoke of the importance
of the office and promised
faithful service if elected.
Mr. J. M. Xichols sewed at: extra
nice barbecue dinner, which many
people, including: a !ar<re number of
ladies, enjoyed.
Th" county campaign will be- held
. at Hunter-DeWalt school house today
(Friday) and at Newberry court
; house next Monday, the 2Mb of Aujr
ust. at 10 o'clock a. m. The election
! comes off on Tuesday next. August
[ 29tn. The polls will open at S
o'clock and close at 1 o'clock.
i
REVIVAL SERVICES AT
CENTRAL METHODIST CHURCH
.
.
There will be a series of Revival!
I
Services at Central Methodist Church
beginning September 3, and running (
j through September 17. There will be
two services daily, at 10 A. M. an 1
| 8 P. M. |
| Rev. J. II. Danner uf Charlosion,
cv..,<u 1**111 t!i<> n?*f>ir,hiTiP'
OU U III ViUUHia, mil HV J..
'and Professor C. P. Curry of Hend.n*sonville.
X. C., will be the leader in
sung. Rev. Mr. Banner is a strong
preacher and Professor Curry i* an
excellent .singer. His solos will be
great to hear. oGod preaching by
a consecrated man, ami excellent
| singing by a strong cho:r Ld by Processor
Curry. W.- c-xrend ,a pressing
I invitalicr. t-j all th'.* ;>eouio of all denominations
to atend these services.
|
MR. MARTIN L. STRAUSS
3VIr. Martin L. Strauss died very
suddenly at his home on Monday evening.
the 21st, at four o'clock. Hewas
sitting on the porch talking with
his brother and Mr. R. X. Taylor,
3 -.11 ^on,1 ,IKI f'nl) frnni h
i ?iuu an ui a nuuutu ilu ai vol >..?
, chair, after which he only breathed
a time or so.
| Mr. Strauss has been in failing
,health for more than a year and for
the past few weeks heart trouble set
, in with other complications which
. carried him away. j
j His death was not a surprise to
those who were acquainted with his
, condition.
|
; I visited him on Sunday evening
| before he died. He told me that he
1 was feeling better, could eat most
. anvthino- ho wanted, but could not
:tsleep very much. He did not seem to
be despondent over his condition. He j
'ate a very hearty dinner at the table
with the rest of the family just a few
hours before he died, and nursed his
little infant babe "a short while.
He leaves to mourn his departure
a widow and four children, two boys
and two girls, the little babe only
, tor. days old. I
You will never find a man who was
( loser devoted to his brother and
family than Martin L. Strauss. He
has lived a near neighbor to me for j
38 years, and it is a great source of
.satisfaction to say that there has
never been anything unpleasant to
occur between us. He was a very
generous hearted man and one of
, even temperament, slow to anger,
pleasant and always wore a smiling
countenance.
T - '
He was married to Miss Annie
Bobb Feb. 0, 1916, and they lived
"in "ilv tnirfttVior -fro* r?v?l\* a nhnrf np.
?lC4|y ?/ll%Y IV^VtiJVi x \j m. v * ? i k?7?*v/*v
riod of six and a half years.
I The deceased was a good financier
and leaves a large estate. He will be
missed not only in the community
where he lived but throughout the
county. j
The burial services were heJd at
,'the home Tuesday at 3 p. m. by Rev.
L. P. Boland and the body was laid to
rest in the family grave yard near
the home, in the presence of a lajge
gathering of friends and neighbors
which bore evidence oT* the high esteem
in which he was,held. Tha fol
lowing were the pail bearers: S. R.
Metis, J. E. Long, J. I. Boiand, T. H.
Xinard, David Halfajre, L. K. Gallman,
T. L. B. Epps, J. D. H. Kmard.'
The grave was beautifully decorated
. with flowers.
T. J. W.
i August 23, 11)22.
i Siiverstreet to Hear Rev. Black
I
Rev. H. J. Black, president of the
South Carolina synod, wijl preach at
the Silverstreet Lutheran church on
^Sunday morning. August 27th, at
11 o'clock. Probably he will preach
also in the afternoon or evening.
T'nu is invited.
'
There will be one hour's choir
practice at the parsonage Saturday
evening at 8:S0 o'clock. A1 i interested
in singing wll! please come
promptly. j
Thos. F. Su'jer,
( Pastor.
?
Attention Club Women
The meeting of the Council of
Farm Women h ;s been postponed until
Saturday. September 2 at 3
o'clock at chamber of commerce
rooms Owing to illness of the president.
the duties assigned her could
not be perfected. Every club member
is a member of the council.!
Please try to be present. j
Mrs. C. A. Matthews.
I President. j
I ~ *
OFFICIAL BALLOT
Democratic Primary Electon,
August 29, 1922 i
For use at Precincts where there are
less than 30 enrolled voters)
For Governor
(Vote for one, .scratch others)
COLE L. BLEASE
J. J. CANT FA*
WILLIAM COLEMAN
JOHN T. DUNCAN
GEOREG K. LANKY
THOMAS G. McLEOD
For Lieutenant Governor
(Vcfe for cne, scratch others)
E. C. L. ADAMS
t:. B. JACKSON
JENNINGS K. OWENS
For Secretary of State
(Vote for one, scratch ether)
W. BANKS DOVE
JAMES C. DOZIER
Fcr Attorney General
(Vote fcr c no, scratch others)
HAROLD El BANKS
D. M. WINTER
SAM'L M. WOLFE
For Comptroller General
(Vcte for one, scratch ether)
WALTER E. DUNCAN
T. HAGOOD GOODING
For State Treasurer
SAM'L T. CARTER
7cr State Superintendent cf Education
(Vote for cne, scratch others)
MRS. BESSIE RODGERS DRAKE
J. H. HOPE
O. D. SEAY
CECIL H. SEIGLER
J. E. SWEARING EN
MRS. E. BARTON WALLACE
7or Adjutant and Inspector General
fVcte for one, scratch ether)
ROBERT E. CRAIG
THOMAS B. MARSHALL
For Commissioner of Agriculture
(Vote for one, scratch ether)
B. HARRIS
GEORGE W. WIGHTMAX
OFFICIAL BALLOT
NEWBERRY COUNTY
Democratic Primary Election,
August 29, 1922
County Officers.
For Congress Third District and
For Congress:
(Vote for one)
FRED H. DOMINICK
ED. D. McC-RAVY
SAM II. SHERARD
Fcr House of Representatives:
(Vote for three)
EUGENE S. BLEASE
W. B. BOINEST
H. II. EVANS
J. WM. FOLK
E. N. KIBLER
W. R. WATSON
W. M. WILSON
For Judrj?: of Probate:
W. F. EWART
For Magistrate Nos. 1 and 8:
(Vote for one)
JOHN H. CHAPPELL
CHAS. W. DOUGLAS
W. A. GRADDICK
WESLEY S. JONES
E. L. RODELSPERGER
For Magistrate No. 2:
C. II. ALE WINE
For Magistrate No. 3:
W. D. RUTHERFORD
For Magistrate No. 4:
(Vole for one)
R. M. AUGHTRY
J. ERNEST YOUNG
ror Magistrate No. 5:
J NO. F. MILLER
For Magistrate No. 6:
J. HENRY DORROH
For Magistrate No. 7:
Yv\ P. ALLEN
For Magistrate No. 9:
(Vote for one)
J. L. EOWIr.?vS, JR.
B. B. HAIR
J. B. T. SCOTT
For Magistrate No. 10:
(Vote for one)
i\ B. ELLESOR
. J. J. KIBLER
J. A. KIN A RI)
* * o . , _ NT ^ 11.
X'Cr IVIrtgl >iraic ji.
(Vote for one)
O. A. FELK EE .
B. M. SUBER
For Magistrate at Pomaria:
(Vote for one)
JXO. B. BEDEXBAIGH
E. A. IIEXTZ
For Magistrate at Little Mountain:
.1. </. WESSIXGER
RECALLING THE GOOD OLD
DAYS AT ST. PAUL'S
I was glad of the opportunity to
go down to my old mother church,
St. Paul's, last Sunday to help them
celebrate their annual Old Folk's
! day. I believe they have concluded
to call it Home Coming d iv. I like
this wording much bettter because
home has always had a sweet sound
to me.
Early in the morning the weathtr
looked very threatening and I began
to fear that it was going to be a
rainy day. But we can never tell
what is in a cloud until it. passes by.
It turned out to be a beautiful day.
We never go down into this old
grove but what sweet memories of
our boyhood days flash through our
mfnd, which bring both fueling of
joy and feeling of sorrow. For the
past 54 years 1 have been going to
old St. Paul's, which is my spiritual
birthplace. And 1 always think of
the voice of that blessed old servant
V'ho so faithfully plead and prayed
for the salvation of my soul and all
others. For 44 years telling us so
often if we missed heaven we would
miss everything.
That voice is now still, never to
,be heard inside of the wails of oi l
St. Paul's church again. That body
lies mouldering in the ground out in
the cemetery near the place where
he gave his life of service.
St. Paul says: "Blessed are the
^ead which die in the Lord; from
henceforth, yea, sayeth the Spirit,
that they may rest from their kvors
and their works do follow them."
And I feel that the congregation will
join with me in saying, thank God for
the life work and example of the
Rev. Dr. J. A. Sligh, for his good
works do follow him.
After the Sunday school hour Dr.
Gotwald preached from Psalm 6:23:
"Surely goodness 2nd mercy shall
fellow me all the days of my life, arid
1 will dwell in the house of the Lord
forever. ' Dr. Gotwald's sermon was
very appropriate to the occasion. It
carried a message of inspiration and
divine love, and the large congregation
present gave him very close attention.
i These were the hymns for the
morning service: "Just as I Am,
Without One Plea;" "Jesus Lover of
my Soul;" '*A Charge to Keep I
Have." The singing of these go:>d
old hymns made me think of our old
time religion.
Thf> rlinnrr hour v.'as .mnounced bv
Pastor Koon and a hearty welcome
was given to all present to partake
of a bountiful spread under the
shade of the old oak trees on the left
fronting the church. The good people
of St. Paul's are noted for their
hospitality.
i During the noon hour I went in the
grave yard to see the place where the
bodies of my father and mother-inlaw
lie, and as I stood and read the
epitaphs on their tombs, I thjught of
the last word Father Epos spoke to
me before he died. As he field my
hand, he said, "I love you." These
words were spoken 08 years ago,
but they will remain fresh in my
memory as long as I live, and not
many clays pass that they do not
COllie lu my mniu.
j The cemetery is in fine condition,
no ^rass, weeds, briars and vines to
be seen. It is just as clean as a yard.
This speaks praise to any people,
i Co!. E. H. Aull a?.iin showed that
fatherly and motherly love by bringing
his g'c ui eld parents down to the
home coming day where they had
worshipped and held their membership
the thirteen years th.it they lived
in this community. You may
speak hard things about Col. Aull,
but the love and care he shows for
his parents i;: proof enough , for me
that there is something good about
him. When 1 hoar of a child who
turns his back on his parents there is
nothing- more they can do to n tore
.their coniidonce to me that I love to
have for my fallow m.:n.
A little after 2 o'clock we were
called back into the church to listen
to a most excellent address by Dr. J.
V. Loner. He paid u high tribute to
Dr. J. A. Sligh and Mr. and Mrs. Luther
Aull. Everything he said was
to the point and well spoken, an evidence
of Dr. Long's ability. He is
! kept on the go.
i This ended another sroou day fov
old St. Paul?.
T. J. W.
NEWBERRY COLLEGE MAKING
READY FOR OPENING SESSION
i
I
Summer Schcol Great Success?All
j Dormitories Nearly Taken Up
Prospects Look Good
| The summer session at Newberry
J college closed on Augost 18th. Very
[line work was done by the members
! of the summer school faculty and by
'the students. Practically all the students
remained through the entire
t<?rni and took the final examinations,
i The total enrollment was 154. Of
1 ' " -1?? 1 Art cr?V>nnl
' lins numoer iuu nca- \juuiiv a\.nv>/i
teachers. Prof. Jas. C. Kinard of the
j college faculty was director.
I The next session of Newberry col.
lege will begin September 12-14.
'Those students expecting to t^ke the
! entrance examinations v/ill report on
| September 12. The forma opening
! will be held at nine o'clock Thursday
morning, Sept, 14th.
The football .->quad will report September
9th. Practice will -begin on
I the following Monday.
The prospect for attendance next
session is very good. The enrollment
will be as large a3 the college can
! take care of. Any prospective stud!
ent who has not vet made his anpli|
j cation for a room in the. dormitory is
urged to do so at once,
i othintip fipld will
vvuia. uu i.?iw in...
be completed in a few weeks. There
is good ground for the hope that a
new gymnasium will be one of the
accomplishments of the coming year.
Newberry college will give a good
account of itself in athletics this
, session. The basketball and baseball
J championships were won last year
,and a fine record made in football,
i Watch the "Scarlet and Gray" in
each of the three major sports this
year.
I "Dutch" MacLean will be with the
, college again.
j There will be no change in the facility.
This is especially pleasing tc
the patrons of the college, who recognize
the eminent ability and faith;
fulness of the men on the Newberrj
college iacuuy.
. _
ENTERTAINMENT ST. PHILIPS
j SCHOOL WEDNESDAY, AUG. 6
| There will bo two short plays..
["Thirty Minutes for Refreshments,"
and "Axin Her Father," given at St
: Phillips school house by the young
; people cf the community Wednesday
evening, August 30th, at 8:00
I o'clock.
| Following nro the characters in
'"Thirty Minutes for Refreshments:"
Polly?Agnes Ringer.
Clarence?Harvey Halfacre.
1 ~vti^P/innnv fJnvan Sease.
| najui i v.
i Arabella Pepper?Lenora Halfacre.
j Mr. Foxton?Bennie Lominick.
| Mrs. Forton?Frances Piester.
Downley?Olin Lominick.
Characters in "Axin Her Father:'
j Polly?Daisy Wicker.
Pendleton Peppercorn ? David
Stone.
Pamely Jane Peppercorn?Sara
Lominick.
Friscilla Ann Peppercorn?Bessie
Lominick.
Aguerus Tyler?Fred Hentz.
The ladies of the St. Phillips con(gregation
will sell ice cream immediately
after the play. The proceeds
from the plays and from the cream
, will be used to help buy carpet foi
[ the church.
T ?. on.] C n
I^.L'1 f V t* I \ UUU.\ LUIllt
: evening; of side-splitting fun anc
help a good cause.
Reedy River Association
This historic body meets with Saiuda
church at Ch.;ppel!s on Tuesdaj
i'.nd Wednesday. September 5 and 6
in annual session. Every church
should have a full delegation of messengers
present. All delegates anc
visitors who intend remaining cvei
night wiil kindly forward their names
to one of the following committee
t n \
op. entertainment: r?. ocuiry,
! T. Coleman. V. K. Dominick; all o1
rhin^ells. Those coming y railwa>
will please advise as to time of arri
val.
Come for the opening and remair
for the final adjournment, if yoi
can. A most cordial welcome await;
you.
G. R. Pettigrew.
i ?
There are still some ex-servic<
men who think congress is going t(
give them a bonus.
I
THE NEWS OF WHITMIRE
Newberry Representatives Cordially
Welcomed?Good of Two Towns
Talked Over
Whitmire, August 24.?
Last Friday we had a pleasant and
profitable visit by Messr-.. McDaniel,
Carpenter and Summer of Newberj
ry chamber of commerce. We soon
! got together our merchants, bankers,
manufacturers, bakers and candlestick
makers and had a fine meeting
in Young Brothers store. Among the
matters discussed were a transfer
line of passengers and freight from
here to Newberry; a way to get
cream from this section to the county
seat, and to find sale here for
Newberry butter. The good effects of
the meeting are already in evidence,
as we buttered our buckwheat cakes f
this morning with the product of
Newberry Creamery.
j For some time there has foeen a
iransfer from here to Union, whfch
is well patronized, especially on Sat;
urdays by mill people, who go there
; to trade. All* this traffic could be
1 turned to Newberry if we only had
conveyance at a reasonable rate. It
will handsomely pay Newberry mer;
chants to wake up and get in closer
; touch with the little city of Whit
: mire.
| We were honored with the county
', campaigners last Saturday. They
! I were all sober and solicitous of votes
and had a good crowd on whom to
>, vent their eloquence. Will Watson
! and Eugene Blease received the
1 greatest applause. Dr. Folk was also
well received, especially by the
many ladies present to whom he pass
i ed as a widower. Please see that
1 Mrs. Folk doesn't get a copy, of this,
i as there would be trouble in camp.
Our school will soon open and
! again "teach the young idea how to
", shoot," and the "school boy with
1 shining morning face * creep like a
' | snail, unwillingly, to school/' More
" | room to the school building is being
r: maHp hv- excavatine and plastering ,
! -- ~
! the cellar.
Our ball team, after defeating
Rock Hill on its own ground, played
it three games here last week and of
course we sent the visitors home in
' sack cloth and a3hes. Whitmire team
is on the top step of the ladder of
| amateur ballism. We shout and
' crow and challenge the world and all
outside, more or less.
1
j By the way, some of us were a lit'
tie disappointed Saturday in W. R.
[ I #
, i Watson's speech. He didn't promise
I to make Whitmire a seaport town,
nor did he give us a remedy for our
financial troubles. Neither did he
say, if elected, he would cause all
, events to flow i:a snoothly as cream
} down the throat of a healthy calf,
i nor put Wall Street into bankruptcy,
i nor change the price of postage
, ' stamps. Anyhow, we are proud of
him, and he's going to pass the felI
low in the race for the legislature
who heads the ticket. The standing
of one at home is the acid test of
l. merit, so Will is "0. K."
i
; M iss Ida Brannon has closed her
millinery store and has gone into bus
' " t tU/v a*
mess witn :vir. oimpson ui mc ucpartment
store.
Luther Durkett of Wildwood, Fla.,
"t is on a visit to his aged parents, Mr.
\ and Mrs. Wm. L. Durkett. Luther
L
has a fine jc') with a Florida railroad.
I The boll weevil got us hard and
fast. In a short time a home-made
. bale of cotton will be a curiosity,
i;
I West End vs. Johnston
West End plays Johnston here
Friday, August 25 at 5 p. m. This
promises to be one of the best games
of the season as Johnston has a good
' .club and will possibly 'bring a new
battery.
On Monday, August 28, at 5 p. m..
West Lnd plays Whitmire at West
End park.
Every one knows what this means
as Whitmire has won the state amaJ
teur championsip for this season.
" 1 * ?x ' - ~ lUa -?5nv
west t^na inienus iu mean. un j???~
this club has had over them all this
season.
Admission 20 and 30 cents. _
1
i
. Kin? George has gone to wearing
a derby hat, and if he will not talk
through it we will be all right.
? Some modern chauffeurs are more
) daring than the old-time cowboys evjer
dreamed of being.

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