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The Manning times. (Manning, Clarendon County, S.C.) 1884-current, November 18, 1885, Image 1

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VOL. I. MANNINGi CLARENDON COUNTY, S. C., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1885. NO. 49.
THE TUSCAROAS.
The story of the Tuscaroras is a
checkered one. They were adorted
into the Iroquois in 1712. They came
from North Carolina in 1708, where
they had 15 towns and 1,500 warriors.
Their existence there was the same as
all other tribes, the same old story
encroachments by the whites, who
robbed them of their lands, and when
resistance followed long and bloody
border wars ensued. They burnt one
Lawson, the surveyor general of North
Carolina, who had marked some of
their territory into lots for settlers.
They captured the German Baron de
Graffenried, but released him after five
weeks on his promise that he would
occupy none of their lands without
their consent. In 1713 invaders of their
territory captured 800 Tuscaroras in a
fort on the Neuse river. These were
killed and sold as slaves into South
Carolina. The remnant migrated to
New York as others had previously
done. Previous to this Tuscaroras, on
the 22 of September, 1711, had killed
130 Whites on Albemarle sound.
In the war of the Revolution most of
the Iroquois adhered to the English,
but many of the Tuscaroras and Oneidas
were friendly to the colonists. When
Gen. Sullivan and Col. Gansevoort
made their destructive campaign a
gainst the Indians on the route to the
lower Mohawk castle they were treated
with every mark of friendship and hos
pitality in passing through the Tusca
rora and Oneida castles. These officers
had been ordered to spare the Tusca
roras and Oneidas. Such portions of
these tribes as had been English allies
escaped in canoes on Oneida lake,
thence down the Oswego river, and
coasted along Lake Ontario to the Brit
ish garrison at Fort Niagara. In 1780
the Tuscaroras camed on a mile square
given them by the Senecas, wh-i is a
part of their present reservation. The
Holland company subsequently gave
them two square miles, of which in
1804 they added by purchase 4,329
acres, making the total of their reser
vation 6,249 acres. The United States
government paid for the purchase $13,
722, being part of the trust funds held
by the United States on final adjust
ment of the claims of the Tuscaroras
upon North Carolina. Thus the Tus
caroras commenced their settlement in
the town of Lewiston 17 years previous
to the advent of the Holland Land com
pany and 19 or 20 years before the
commencement of settlements there by
whites. The Tuscaroras were thus the
pioneer settlers in this region, and the
most kindly relations have existed be
tween them and the whites ever since.
In the war of 1812 the Tuscaroras were
the allies of the Americans against the
he Mount Pleasant family, of whom
John is now the chief of the Tusca
roras, have a prominent history in the
border wars of the old time. His grand
father was a "big Indian," having been
a captain in the British army, and at
one time commandant of Fort Niagara.
His son John was the father of the pres
ent chief. He was 68 years old in 1849,
and has left records of his early expe
rience in this region. He states there
were no crows in the liaggara region
until after the war of 1812. Deer were
not plenty, and the wolves haunted
them, driving them into the lake, and
waiting until they, wearied with swim
ming, came on shore and were caught
and devoured. When the wolves were
hunted out deer became plenty. Bears
were plenty ig some localities, and
panthers were occasionally killed here
abouts. Bittern's white owls, and fiocks
of swan were seen about Niagara falls
and on the islands and in the marshes.
Wild cranberries abounded, and there
were a great number of beaver dams.
Salmon three feet long were often
taken in Eighteen Mile creek, near
Lockport, and below the falls of the
Oak orchard. The "woods are full" of
Indian stories and romances through
out all this region of Niagara county.
The lands hereabout belonged to the
original Holland purchase. The first
wvhite child born on the great Holland
purchase was on the 19th of June,
1801- F'a fine boy," as the records
state. He was subsequently Col. Henry
B. Ransom, of Clarence. In October,
1798, which was before the Holland laud
purchase, on the present site of Buffa
lo, there were but eight buildings, all
log houses, of which Asa Ransom oc
cupied one. He subsequently removed
to7Pine grove, and was the father of the
"fine boy." As late as 1806 there were
only 19 dwellings iun ffalo.-Ransom
ville (N. Y.) Cor. Troy Biudget.
The Unlucky Opal.
"The prejudice against opals may
be dying out, but a great many people
still hold to the belief that they bring
bad luck," said a jeweler the other
day. "I could tell you of a little inci
eengt that occurred here that may make
-Non wonder whether some peopie do
not manage to get themselves born
three centuries too late. A man came
here with a ring that had a beatutiful
opal set in it, and told me to take out
the stone and let him see some other
gem to put in its place. I asked him
if he was going to get rid of the opal
altogether, and he said he was going
to destroy it. I was rather surprised,
and said:
"'Don't do that; I'll give you $50
for it.'
"Ho declared that he didn't want
money for it; that it had brought him
nothing but bad luck since he bought
it; that he had failed in business and
lost two of his children, and all, of
course, on account of a little piece of
stone. I went over to that bench and
took the opal out of its setting, and
while looking at the ring I laid the
gem on the bench beside me. -As quick
aa flash that man picked up a ham
mer that was lying among the tools
and hit the stone a whack that smash
ed it into a thousand pieces. There
was nothing left. Then he said
'There!' in a satisfied manner. It's
too batd, for the opal is one of the pret
tiest gems in the world."-New Yorkc
Sun.
The largest apple tree in the United
States is growing at Cheshire,. Conn.
.lt is 60 feet high, spreatds 1'00 ieet, and
yields from~ 75 to 110 busieels of :q>
ples per year on alternate sides of th~e
GENERAL NEWS ITEMS.
Facts of Interest, gathered from Various
Quaners.
-War between Burinah and the
Indi n Government has been formally
declared.
-The Indians in New Mexico are
again raiding ranches and murdering
the whites.
-A land rent collector named Myers
wps shot last Wednesday in Kilbeggat,
county Westmeath, Ireland.
While attempting to repair an iron
bridge near Keithsburg, Ill., a portion
of thie work fell, killing and wounding
a dozen men.
-All the gambling houses in Ciii
cinnati were raided Monday night and
several wagon loads of men were taken
to the police station.
-The Hon. A. A. McKay, Judge of
the sixth circuit judiciary district of
North Carolina, died at his home in
Clinton on Thursday morning.
-Mr. Wm. Jones, who lives in
Ve2ezuela 2,700 miles away, came to
Virginia and voted at Richmond an
urscratched Democratic ticket.
-The Eliza, a vessel now loarding
at Quebec, is declared by the Toronto
Globe to have seen a century and a
half active service, and to be yet a
staunch and handsome craft.
-There has been an alarming in
crease in the number of suicides in
Berlin within the past several months.
Cases are reported daily, and some
days they number as high as ten.
-The will of the late Gen. George
B. McClellan was filed with the Pro
bate Court last week. It gives his
roperty to his wife, and after her
eath equally to his son and daughter.
-All the public schools of Sava:nah,
Ga., are crovded ta excess, and with
in the past few days one hundred and
fifty applicants have been refused' ad
mission for want of room in the schools.
-Mrs. Martha Wilkerson, of Greens
boro, N. C., and her son had a disa
greement about the widow marrying a
hired man. The next morning mother
and son were found dead from pistol
bullets. No clue.
-The Rev. John Wides, colored, of
Pittsburg, Pa., is suing several persons
of th.;t town for conspiracy with other
persons in Alabama, (where Knox
made himslf obrox'oas as a preacher),
to injure his reputation.
-The Empire Plaster mills, Nos.
21 and 23 Bethune stt eet, New York,
a six-story brick building, was burned
on Wedne-day, and the walls fell in,
the firemen and neighboring houses
having a very narrow escape.
-At Montreal last week five men
were painting the ceiling of a drill
shed when the scaffolding gave way
and two of the men were killed in
stantly, a third died shortly after,
and the two others are not expected to
live.
-The wife of Wilhelm Freund, a
German farmer in Henry county,
Onio, gave birth to five healthy chil
dren recently. She is thirty-six years
of age and during her married life of
nineteen years has given birth to
twenty-one children.
-A citizen of Andersonville, Ga., in
1882 caught a very small opossnm,
marked it and let it go. A few days
ago he caught the same opossum with
in two hundred yards of where he
caught him three years ago, and he
now weighs eight pounds.
-Au Ottawa dispatch says that the
death sentence passed on those recent
lv convicted of murder in connection
with the Northwest rebellion, will be
commuted in several cases, but will be
carried into effect with the remainder
on the date fixed, the 27th inst.
-Secretary Endicott has sent in
strctions to military commanders who
rre stationed in the neighborhood in
which uprisings against the Chinese
are apt to occur to have their troops
in readiness to enforce the provisions
of the President's proclamatior, issued
Saturday.
-Capt. M. 0. McGuyer, of Cincin
nati, who came to Tennessee with
Georoe H. Thomas Post, G. A. R.,
was cirowned in the Tennessee River,
near Coulterville, while out dnck
hunting and while trying to save the
life of a colored boy who was with
him when the boat capsized.
-The apple crop this year in the
State of New York, as well as in sev
eral of the New EDgland States was
the largest vield ever known, The
fruit is of excellent quality. The aver
age price is about S1.35 a barrel. Out
of this has to come the~ price of the
barrel, leaving the net price of the
n'it about $1 a barrel.
-The closing of the bars on election
day in Massachusetts worked like a
charm everywhere. In Boston the
police auth'orities were astonished.
During October the number of 'drunks'
before the police courts averaged for
ty-two daily. On the morning after
the election it was found that only
seven arrests for drunkenness had
been made--a smaller number than
had been presented for at least seven
years.
-Near Kissimme, Fla., last week, a
gentleman riding along in a buggy
noticed a large hawk pounce down
upon and fix his talons in the body of
a black snake. The snake immediate
ly coiled itself around the hawk's neck,
and the contest of life and death began.
After watching them for some time,
the gentleman got out, threw them
into his buggy and then drove to a
neighbor's several miles distant. The
coestants each still retained the grip
in the other, though both were yet
alive. They were then dispatched.
A True Bill Found.
EDGEFIELD, November 12.-Evening.
-The grand jury has just come into
Court with true bills against thirty-one
f the persons charged wvithi the mur
der of 0. T. Culbreath. No bill was
found in the cases of W. H. Hammond
and Wyatt S. Seigler.
NO RIOT.
AUGUSTA, November 12.--Reports
were current here to-day of riots and
bloodshed in Edgefield, but they prove
to have been untrue. &t 6, p. in., all
as quiet
Writing on tie aiubjet of edoiweis!
Mr. Burbi-i-e. of ti"! Trinity Colley
Botanical GardIen. Dublin. points ou
that the iut is e:1siiV jrown in En
glish Lardens ifo'n seed. IL, is sown i
commlaiuui g:mnien e:m h in : cold frani
and when iarge en.. e..I'ii:tti-- plau
is placed in a Sll:%. pot iu a it;Xuiure c
loamy earth and oid lime rubbish; o
the plants, i :. are equ 'lly wel
pleased by a clile in asunny rock gal
den, prm id.e:i a s 'upplv oi thid r favorit
lim' rui...; -: o|.! miorta1r itae :lltforde
then:. C.::.y : ite ge rai liy re
ceived .l:1. t:V:; eelweiss is reaily
plant oa-f ttte easy culture frot
seeds as here dircted, ai-. further
gooi freL seeds of it ar-e q1ie readi!
obtainable frot th1e u-aal sure: s
seed supply.
NORTHEASTERN RAILROAD C(
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT.
CHARLEsToN, S. C., July 24, 18S>.
On and after this date the followin
schedule will be run:
Lv. Charleston, No. 43, 12.25 p. n
Lv. Charleston, No. 47, 12.55 a. n
Ar. Florence, No. 43, 4.10 p. n
Ar. Florence, No. 47, 4.52 a. n
Lv. Florence, \o. 40, 1.35 a. a
Lv. Florencc, No. 42, 12.05 p. n
Ar. Charleston, No. 40, 5.00 a. n
Ar. Charleston, No. 42, 4.05 p. n
Nos. 40 and 47 will not stop. No
42 and 43 will stop at all stations.
CENTRAL RAILROAD OF S. (
DALY-NO. 53.
Lv. Charleston, 7.20 a. n
Lv. Lanes, 8.36 a. n
Lv. Manning, 9.06 a. n
Lv. Sumter, 9.33 a. n
Ar. Columbia, 10.40 a. n
No. 52.
Lv. Columbia, 5.27 p. n
Lv. Sumter, 6.39 p. n
Lv. Manning, 7.10 p. n
Lv. Lanes, 7.38 p. n
Ar. Charleston, 9.05 p n
Nos. 52 and 53 will stop at Lane:
Foreston and Manning.
J. F, DIVINE, Genl. Supt.
T. M. E3DIERSON, Genl. Pass. Agt.
WILMINGTON, COLUMBIA ANJ
AUGUSTA RAILROAD.
(;ENERAL PASSENGER DEPARTMENT.
COLUMBIA, S C., May 11, 1884.
The following Schedule will be opei
ated on and after this date:
No. 48, DAILY.
Lv. Wilmington, 8.00 p. n
Li. Lake Waccamaw, 9.19 p. n
Lv. Marion, - 11.00 p. ]
Ar. at Florence, 11.40 a. a
Ar. at Sumter, 4.34 a. a
Ar. at Columbia, 6.40 a. n
GOING SOUTH-No. 40, DAILY.
Lv. Wilmingon, 10.30 p. U
Lv. Lake Waccamaw, 11.46 p. n
Ar. at Florence, 1.45 a. i
No. 43, DAILY.
Lv. Florence, 4.05 p. a
Lv. Marion, 4.51 p.,u
Lv. Lake Waccamaw, 6.43 p. n
Ar. at Wilmington, 8.05 p. a
GOING NORTH-No. 47, DAILY.
Lv. Columbia, 9.55 p. u
Ar. at Sumter,. 12.06 a. a
Lv. Florence, 4.50 a. n
Lv. Marion, 5.32 a. n
Lv. Fleminaton, 7.17 a. a
Ar. at Wilmington, 8.35 a. n
Nos. 48 and 47 stops only at Brini
ley's, Whiteville, Lake Waccamav
Fair Bluff, Marion, Florenec, Tin
monsville, Sumter, Camden Junctio
and Eastover.
Passengers for Columbia and a
points on C. & G. R. R., C. C- & I
R. R. stations, Aiken Junction, an
all points beyond, should take No.4
~ight Express.
Separate Pullman Sleepers fc
Charleston and for Augusta on trait
8 and 47.
Passengers on 40 can take Train4
from Floi-ence for Columbia, August
Georgia points via Columbia.
All trains run solid betweetn Charku
ton and Wilmington.
Offices Wilmington, N. C.
3. F. DlVINE, General Supt.
T. M1. EMfERSON, Gen. Pass. Agt.
W. F. B. H.msw0T1a, Sumter, &.
B. 8. Dnxms, MannI"g, &.
HAYNSWORTH & DINKINS,
AlORNEYS AT LAW
Xazz'iIN. s. C.
JOHN S, WILSON,
Attorney and Counsellor a
Law,
MANxxJe, s, C, jan:
3. E. SCOTT,
Attorney and Counsellor a
Law,
mXAXNJe, S. C. feb.
A. LEVI,
ATTORNEY AT LAiW,
XaNxxNG, s. c.
Notary Public with Seal. Mh
The Best Newspaper in America,
and by far the Most Readable.
Agents wanted everywhere to earn
money in distributing the Sun's Pre
miums.
The most interesting and advanta
geous offers ever made by any News.
paper.
No Subscriber ignored or neglected.
Something for all.
Beautiful and Substantial Premiums in
Standard Gold and otherWatchmes,Valuable
Books, the Best Family Sewing Ilachine
known to the trade, and an unequaled list,
of objects or real utility and instruction.
Rates, by Mail, Postpaid:
DAILY, per Year (without sunday) $6 00
DAILY, per Month (without Sunday) 50
SUNDAY, per Year . . . I 00
FOR EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR 7 00
WEEKLY, per Year . .. I 00
e
2DRY GOODS
t
CARPETS
FOR
FALL AND WINTER
01
1. 185
If you need any New Dry Goods,
New Carpets, New Mattings, New
Shades, Ncw Rugs, New Oilcloths
and New Gent's Furnishing Goods,
then
& BEICTI t
is the place to buy them. They have
the largest assortment, and the
prices they guarantee to be lower
D than any other House. Their
European and American buyers re
port that they have purchased a
large Stock and Superior Quality of
Goods at very low prices, they hav
Ing bought them before the recent
advance. The following are a few
- of the many bargains they offer at
present:
1 One lot of English BROCADE DRESS
. GOODS at 20k.
1. One lot of Changeable Dress Goods at 20c.
One lot 3-4 Wool Cashmeres at le.
One case 6-4 French Dress Goods at 25c.,
1. worth 75c. These goods come in combina
. tions.
500 pieces of the Latest Novelty Dress Goods
from 12 to $1.25.
One lot of Real French and Italian Black and
Colored Silks at Z5c., $1, $1.25 and $1.50. These
' goods are imported by us, and other houses
- pay more for them at wholesale in New York
-. than we retail them here.
. One lot of Black Surahs and Radzamas at $1,
would be cheap at $1.25.
One case of Black and Colored, all-Silk VPl
L vets at 97c., better qualities in proportion.
1. Good Standard Prints at 4c. and Sc.
Best Quality Fall Sateen Chintz at 8c.
30-inch fine Ginghams at 7c.
-nglish Cretonnes at lic., worth 35c., latest
designs.
I. One case heavy Brown Canton Flannels at
- 63c.
One case extra heavy Brown Canton Flan
I nels at c.
- One case Superior Brown Canton Flannels at
D 10c., 123c. and15ce.
Good standard 3-4 Brown Shirting at 3%c.
jGood standard '7-8 Brown Shirting at 4%c.
Good standard 4-4 Brown Shirting at Sc.
10- Brown Sheeting at17c.
d 10-4 fie Bleached Sheeting at 20c., 22e. and
8 25.
Blue all-wool Flannels at 19e., 25c. and 35c.
We guarantee that these Flannels are 10c. per
yard cheaper than they can be bought at any
Sother house.
A good Jersey at 69c.
8- An all-wool Jersey for $1.23.
aA full new line of Gents' Fall Undershirts
and Unlaundried Shirts willbe sold at a great
saing to the purchaser.
S~ IAnother lot of Gent's Unlaundried Shirts at
47c.,59c. and 69c. Cannot be duplicated in any
house for less than 75e. and $1..
A new line of Tweeds and Cassimers, very
cheap, direct from Saxony.
- 200 pieces of Yac Laces from 10c. to 50c. per
yard. We have them in every color, plain and
tinselled.
A new line of Beaded and Steel Laces ; also
Black and White Beaded Fronts.
A new line of White Laces, very cheap, In all
styles.
A new line of Antique Tidies at 11c., worth
- A new line of Black Goods.
Something remarkable In Handkerchiefs.
50 dozen 3- Gent's Linen Handkerchiefs at
* $1per dozen, worth $3. Other Handkerchiefs
inproportion.
100 dozen Ladles' regular Balbriggain Hose,
Silk Clocke.d, at 23c.- also Ladies' Brown and
3 Fancy Balbriggan Hose at the low price of 23c.
per pair.
500 dozen Children's Imported Hose, fall
styles, at17c., 19c., 23c. and 33c.
,The following goods, which were slightly
amaged by the late cyclone, will be sold re
gardless of cost:
SA ot of White Blankets at $1.90, $3.90, $4.65
-. and $5.90. The Blankets are worth double the
money.
One lot of Bied Twill Flannels at 25c., worth
One lot of fine Bleaching at 5%c.
8 -o
CARPET DEPARTMENT.
1,000 SMYRNA RUGS, in all sizes, at lesthan
the cost of the raw material. We bought these
goods from a manufacturer for net cash, who
has been pushed for money.
One lot of full size Smyrna Rugs at $3, worth
New Carpets received and continually ar'
rivingin all etyles.
Fine Ingrains at 25c, and upwards.
Extra Supers at 65c. and upwards.
Fine Brussels at 65c. and upwards.
Four and flve frame Body Brussels at $1.10
and $1.25.
A new line of Velvet Carpets at 3734, last
year's price $2.
500 pair of fine Dado Shades, new patterns
With Spring Rollers, at 89c. each.
One lot of Hassocks at 25c.
Country Merchants will do well to examine
our Stock before purchasing their Fall hills.
All retail orders promptly agtended to, and
samples sent on application.
Parties ordering goods or samples will please
state in what paper they have seen our adver
tisement.
SENSIBLE PEOPLE
'
I
ARE NOT EASILY DECEIVED, FOR,
hey know quite well that good and had I
lIothing are alike made to sell; and who
.vas ever known to advertise poor clothing?",
l'hey know how nearly all clothiers keep
;he linest and sell-on paper-at less thana
t cost to make them. Honest prices, wel I t
nade and nicelv fitting clothes, togethert
Nith a good narine (justly deserved ), are t
younid to tell. - b
The above being a fact, I state it merely
o enforce the uoint that I have ready for
N -
nspection the' largest ar -1 best assorted
;tock of Fall and Winter Clothing for men,
rouths and boys, that can be found in the
itate. They are peerless in variety and
onestly good all the way through; even
;e underlinings are shrunk and the trim
nings used are meant to wear, not merely {
o help sell the goods, as every garent is
varranted as represnted. There are un
ssailable ramparts behind which I invite
ou to deal. I am not here for a season
y; I am :ere to stay. thy stock this sea
;on is the largest I nave ever carried, and
t embroaces every style and fashionable
arment that is made. I am willing to I
ompare them with the merchant tailor
ork, and it is with real pleasure to tate I
hat the business of this EMPORIUM OF e
AShHION is steadily on the increase. Mty
arge and constantly increasing patronage i:
etfies more forcibly than words than the
alues offered by me are not equalled by
tny house in the Stlte.
Ta prove the truth of this I ask buyers
make their own comparisons, as I enjoy
ohen a reputation above that and beyond ,
hat of all clothiers in this vicinity at least
>roducing a superior class of regular
l'ailor-made Csothing and Gent' Furnish.
ng Goods, Hats and Fine Shoes. This is
;e headquarters for the correct styles in r
nen's and bovs' attire. All orders sent to
ny care will ne promptly attended to.
Respectfully,
M. L. KINARD. d
Columbia, S . hi. d
F. N. W ILSON.
INSURANCE AGENT,
MANNING, S. C.
Dec17 t
C
W. E, BROWN,
Physician & Surgeon,
offers his professional services to-the people of (
danning and the surroundina country. Calls a
ended romptiy night or day.
Mfle at Drug Store. J 8
I C. H. CLAUSSEN & CO.,
itclI Balofy Eul Cady Factory,
CHARBEStOq, S. C.
W. A. Reckling,
1101 MAIN STREET,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
Portraits, Photographs, Ste
reoscopes, Etc.
OLD PICTURES COPIED AND ENL ARGED.
Sept 16
EDEL BROS.,
RICHMOND', VA.,
Mdanufacturers of
Tobacco & Cigars, s
SAnd Wholesale Liquor Dealers.
FOR U]
WALL PAPERS, CORNICES,
3ORNICE IPOLES,
WINDOW SHADES, ]
LACE CUItTAINS.
Canl at the LeadingfHousein the State for theso
tnd of goods.
J. II. DAVs' Carpet Store, C
COLUMBIA, S. C.
Sueveral new desgnsi Tapety Bruss boy
;he Fall trade bave already arrived an~d many
:fhers on t he way.
1.000 Smyrna Rugs "
&nd Mats, all New Patternis, also a line selec
ion of
Brussels Rugs and Mats.
Cocoa and Napler Mattings, new stock~ just In ']
Notice is given to the public that I
have secured the agency for this Coun'
t to sell John P. Boyd's work on the
Iife of Grant. I will take pleasure in
supplying any one wishing to purchase.
BOY'CE NE LSON,
Spts2 M.mi~xo, S. C.
WELL CLEANING
CHEAPLY DONE
Apply to
~ BOYCE NELSON,
mm . C.
Wm. shepherd & o.,
128 MEETING STREET, .
CRARLESTON, SO. CA.
STOVES,
STOVES, STOVES
-AT
WHO*ILESALE
ANDb
RETA ILI
Tinwares, House Furnishing Goode
Potware, Kitchen and Stove Utenmils.
gji Send for Price List and Ciren
lars.
TO THE
PEOPLE OF CLARENDON CO
-0
C. MAYHEW & SO
COLUMBIA AND ORANGEBURO.
. .......
WORKS.
Manufacturers of:Ed Dealers in all
kinds of AMERICAN and ITALIAN
MARBLE WORK.
x Granite Quarries near Winns
boro, South Carolina.
Country orders promptly attended.a
to, and designs furnished on applica. a
Jan21..
A WATRM
WELCOME
AWAITS YOU ATi
-0
OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE,
MANNING, SOUTH CAROLINA
Regardless of the high license he.
sells the very FINEST BRANDS of.
LIQORS, WINES and BEE1R
REMEMBER
The t-est LIQUORS for Less Money
than anywhere else.
LIQUORS FOR MEDICINAL PUR-.
POSES A SPECIALTY.
Agent for the leading Cigars of the
State. The John McCullough and the.
Eagle Brand; also the largest and finest
stock of other Cigars and Tobaeco In
BILLIARDS AND POOL.
On first-class tables, with separate
room for colored people.
HOT FANCY DRINKS.
Ie begs to tender his thanks to his
friends and patrons and asks a continu
ance of the same.
Coe~ one! Come all!!
y ih member that Polite Clerks
serve.you and every attention shown.
Dc17
CAN'T BE BEAT,
HE DRIVEN WELL MAKES IT EASY to get
Water.
o Well Cleaning. Cheap ! Durable!
CALL ON
T. C. sca1Te,
SUMTER, S. C.
JACOBI HOUSE,
FLORENCE. S. C.
M. JACOBI. AGT,,
PROPRIETOR.
iT'L'very Stable in connection, Fe' 25
'LEMAN'S HOTEL,
Kingstree, S. C.
MRS. S. A. ST. JOH N,Sole Proprietress.
oard t2 per day. The Hotel has recently
een thoroughly repaired and refurnishrdi
rth all modern appliances of a first-class
oteL. Saloon, Billiard and Pool Rooms
nd Feed Stables. The proprietress re
irns thank! for the liberal patronage here
)fore bestowed, aZfl will contnueto main
,in the high charadter which the Hotel
as always enjoyed.
GRAND GENTRAL
HOTEL,
,oluzzibia, Sn C.
C. H. FISHER, Prop'r.
NOTICE TO FARMERS.
I respectfully call to the attention of the
'armers of Clarendon the fact that I have
xcured the Agency for the Corbin Disk
[arrow, Planet Jr. Horse Hoe and Culti
ator, Johnson Harvester and the Conti
ental Reaper. I have one of each of these
istruments for disnlay at my stables, and
dll take pleasure in showing and explain
g their utility. No progressive farmer
m afford to do without these implements.
W. K. BELL, Agt.,
Apr15 Manning, S. C.
Notice T
FIRST CLASS BARBER SHOP in the
ear of the store lately occupied 'uy Mr. F.
L Thomas. . Work done in the latest
tyles. Hair-cutting, Shaving, Shampoo
ag, and Hair and Moustache Dyeing. La
ies waited upon at their residences. Chil
ren's Hair-cutting, and Razor Sharpening
specialty.
J. T. EDWARDS, Artist,
.pr1 Manning, S. C.
Notice .
I desire to call to the attention of the Mill
[en and Cctton Planters of Clarendon,
2at I have secured the agency for this
ounty. for the DANIEL PRATT RE
OLVING HEAD GIN. Having used
ais Gin for several years I can recommend
as the best Gin now in use. Any infor
iation in regard to the Gin will be cheer
ally given. I can also supply the people
f Clarendon with any other machinery
rhich they may need, at the lowest prices.
'arties wishing to purchase gins will find
to their interest to give their ordtrs early.
V. SCOTT HAILVIN,
May 5 Manning, S. C.
E[IP, HIP,
HURRAH!
-FOR THE
RUN BY
Who keeps Liquors of all sorts.
MIANNING, S. C.
EE HIS SELECTED STOCK OF
WHISKIES, WINES, ETC.
hc best at low prices to suit the times.,
have on hand the greatest variety jfo
TOBACCO IN TOWN.
IA GE R BE ER.
Cigars of all Brands and in fact
erting kept in a first-class Saloon.
Being acquainted with the people of!
is county for the last twenty-five
ears, I understand their wants and
ep goods to suit them. gW MY
ERSONAL ATTENTION GIVEN
O0 CUSTOMERS.
~LAIN AND FANCY DRINKS.
W FREE POOL on a Fine Pool
~able.
g Remember the Place. 2
M. SCHWARTZ is the spot, where
he best and cheapest liquors can be
Dec17
~~RTSThedb be bookfrin
advertiser to con
enced__ or otherwise
[t contains lists of newspapers and estimates
fthe cost of advertising. The advertiser who
wants to spen~d one dollar, finds in It the in
formation he requires. while for him who will
nvest one hundred thousand dollars in ad
vertising, a scheme is indicated which will
met his er rqu ilred ca byad
respondence. 149 editions have been issued.
Sent post-paid, to any address for 10 cents.
Write to GEO. P. ROWELL & CO.,
NEWSAPER ADVERTISING BUREAU.
anamanpe.nnnQUSa~ olw York..

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