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The Manning times. (Manning, Clarendon County, S.C.) 1884-current, December 02, 1885, Image 1

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VOL. I. MANNNG, CLARENDON COUNTY, S. C., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1885. NO.51.
THE GENERAL A&RSEMBLY.
Both Branches of our Legislative Depart
ment Get Promptly to Work-Some Meas
ures to be considered.
(Condense from the Neews and Courier.)
Pursuant to law, the General Assem
bly of South Carolina met in Colum
bia en Tuesday the 24th uit. The
Senate was called to order by Lieuten
ant-Governor Sheppard and the House
by Speaker S.Aons.
The annual message of the Governor
was received, read, and referred to
appropriate committees.
Owino- to the intervening of Thanks
giving fay there were, last week, but
four working days for the General As
sembly. These were well spent in the
introduction or consideration of vari
ous measures of public importance.
A brief statement of these will prove
of general interest.
The House passed to its third read
ing (introduced at the last session, by
Mr. Brice, of Fairfield) the joint reso
lation proposing an amendment to the
Constitution, touching the distribution
of the two-mill school-tax. After
some debate the joint resolution was
ordered to be engrossed foi a third
reading in about the following shape:
"SEC1ION 5. The boards of county
commissioners of the several counties
shall levy an annual tax of not less
than 2 ills on the dollar, &c., for the
support of the public schools in their
respective counties, which tax, &c.,
shall be held in the county treasuries of
the respective counties and paid out
exclusively for the support of the pub
lic schools as provided by law. There
shall be assessed on all taxable polls
li the btate the annual tax of one dol
lar on each poll, &c., for educational
purposes. The school tax shall be
dis tributed among the several ton
ships of the counties, and in counties
where there are no townships among
the tax districts, in proportion to the
amount of taxes paid by said town
ships or tax districts."
ln the Senate, the House bill to pro
vide stenographers for the fifth and
sixth circuits caused some debate.
Various minor amendments were
adopted. Senator Black tried to have
the section referring to the sixth cir
cuit stricken out, and was seconded by
Senator Clyburn. The agricultural
Senators pnerally supported the mo
tion, but it was defeated by a vote of
16 to 14, and the bill was passed.
There will be another fight on the
third reading.
A message was raceived from the
Governor announcing his veto of the
bill passed last session "to make
School District No. 1, Sumter county,
a separate and distinct school district,
and to require the school tax and fund
collected and received in the same to
be applied exclusively to school pur
poses in said district.) The applica
tion of the fund expressed in the title,
the Governor says, is in conflict with
Article X, Section 5, of the Constitu
tion', as amended, which declares that
"the school tax shall be distributed 3
among the several school districts of
the counties in proportion to the re*
spective number of pupils attending
the public schools."
Among the new measures introduc
ed are the following:
By Senator Smythe, to amend the
lawis to the sale of real estate adjudged
to be sold.
By Senator Woodward, relatiDg to
the time of holding Circuit Courts in
the sixth circuit.
By Senator Bobo, to provide fees for
certain offcers in cases offorcibleentry
and detainer; to amend Section 1,743,
Chapter 40, of the General Statutes,
relating to licenses.
BySeniator Maxwell, joint resolution
to amend the Constitution respecting
the number of county commissioners.
(Reducing the number to one, and
maing him a; salaried and bonded offi
cer.)
The Senate has considered a good
portion of the very voluminous bill for
the revision and improvement of the
laws for the assessment and collection
of taxes.
Among the new bills introduced in
the House are:
A bill to amend Section 481 of the
Genera! Statutes in reference- to the
salary of Lieutenant Governor. [This
bill abolishes the salary attached to
the office and allows the Lieutenant
Governor $10 pier diem and mileage
during the session of the General As
sembly.)
Bill to amend the law in relation to
the examinination of teachers. [This
bill was so loaded down with amend
ments that it is somewhat diffiult to
follow them. Its object, however, it
may be stated, is topgve to graduates
of any chartered college or university
in the State permission to receive a
teacher's certificate from either the
State or county board of examiners
without undergoing an examination,
.-avided, however, he or she has a
*god moral character.]
Mr. Hemphill introduced a bill to
abolish the office of supervisor of reg
istration, impose the duties of said
office upon the auditors of the several
counties and to provide fortheir com
pensation. Mr. Hemphill says that
the pay of the supervisors is altogether
out of proportion to the services which
they are called upon to perform; that
the work of preparing the registration:
lists was heavy in the beginning, but
that it is now very light and not more
than the auditors can attend to for
slight additional compensation.
Mr. R. D. Lee, off Sumter, gave
notice of a bill to enable the Governor
to provide for the enumeration of the
inhabitants of the State; $26,000 is the
amount appropriated for the work in
the bill which, however, has not yet
been introduced. Mr. Lee has also
given notice of o bill to change the
limits of the 7th Congressional dis
trict. This he proposes to do by trans
ferring Beianfort from the 7th to the 2d
district, a change whic Mr. Lee thinks
will give the Democrats of the Black
district a fighting chance to be repre
sented in Congress.
The bill to prevent the exportation
and trapping and netting of partridges
was killed in the House by a vote of
4$ to 41.
Mr. Henry B. Riehardson, the new
ly elected member from Clarendon
county, was ' te House on
Wednesday an q He made
his maiden speech later. nthe day
Thomas A. Hendrix.
Thomas A. Hendricks, Vice-Presi
dent of the United States died at his
residence in Indianapolis, Ind., on the
24th inst. The announcement of the
sudden death of this statesman was a
shock to the whole nation. Mr.
Hendricks has occupied a prom
inent place before the public for
many years, and throughout his long
public career he was noted for his
strict adherence to Democratic princi
ples as laid down by the Father of
Democracy, Thomas Jefferson.
Mr. Hendricks was born in Ohio,
but when he was yet a child his father
moved to Indiana with which State the
subject of this sketch was always
identified. Hs was at the age of
twenty-six first called into public ser
vice as a member of the Legislature,
and since which time he has occupied
various prominent positions. As
commissioner of Lands he won the
ommendation of all. As a Congress
man and Senator while faithful to his
State's interest he was always prompt
to give his best efforts to the promotion
of the nation's welfare. He was nom
inated for the Vice-Presidency in 1876
with Samuel J. Tilden, but by the
most gigantic frand ever perpetrated
on a iation he was deprived of his
office. In 1884, as the represenative
of the old ticket, he was the nominee
for Vice-President with Grover Cleve
land as President. They were elected,
and since the election Vice-President
Hendricks has discharged the duties of
this office with the same integrity
which has characterized his whole life.
By the death of Mr. Hendrieks the
nation loses a faithful servant and the
South a warm friend.
WILMINGTON, COLUMBIA AND
AUGUSTA RAILROAD.
GESERAL PASSENGER DERPAiTMENT.
COLUMBIA, S C., May 11, 1884.
The following Schedule will be oper
ated on and after this date:
No. 48, DAILY.
Lv. Wilmington, 8.00 p. m.
Lv. Lake Waccamaw, 9.19 p. m.
Lv. Marion, 11.00 p. m.
Ar. at Florence, 11.40 a. m.
Ar. at Sumter, 4.34 a. m.
Ar. at Columbia, 6.40 a. m.
GOING SOUTH-No. 40, DAILY.
Lv. Wilmington, 10.30 p. m.
Lv. Lake Waccamaw, 11.46 p. m.
Ar. at Florence, 1.45 a. m.
No. 43, DAILY.
Lv. Florence, 4.05 p. m.
Lv. Marion, 4.51 p. m.
Lv. Lake Waccamaw, 6.43 p. m.
Ar. at Wilmington, -8.05 p. m.
GOING NORTH-No. 47, DAILY.
Lv. Columbia, 9.55 p. m.
Ar. at Sumter, 12.06 a. m.
Lv. Florence, 4.50 a. m.
Lv. Marion, 5.32 a. m.
Lv. Flemington, 7.17 a. m
Ar. at Wilmington, 8.35 a. m.
Nos. 48 and 47 stops only at Brink
lev's, Whiteville, Lake Waccamaw,
Fair Bluff, Marion, Florence, Tim
monsville, Sumter, Camden Janction
and Eastover.
Passengers for Columbia and all
points onC. &G. R.R., C. C. & A.
R. R. stations, Aiken Junction, and
all points beyond, should take No. 48
Night Express.
Separate Pullman Sleepers for
Charleston and for Augusta on trains,
48 and 47.
Passengers on 40 can take Train 48.
from Florence for Columbia, Augusta,
Georgia, and points via Columbia.
All trains run solid between Charles
ton and Wilmington.
Offices Wilmington, N. C.
J. F. DIVINE, General Supt.
T. M. EMERS0N, Gen. Pass. Agt.
W. F. . rasWoE-m, sumter, s. C.
5.. .Dzhxxxs, annlng, &. C.
HAYNS WORTH & DINKINS,
ATTIORNEYS AT LAW,
NANNINe. B. C.
JOHN S, WILSON,
Attorney and Counsellor at
Law,
NANNING, 5, C, jans1
Attorney and Counsellor at
Law,
XAXNNNS,.S.C. feb.25
ALEVL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Notary Public with Seal. Mch18
The Best Newspaper in America,
and by far the Most Readable.
Agents wanted everywhere to earn
money in distributing the Sun's Pre
miums.
The most interesting and advanta
geous offers ever made by any News
paper.
No Subscriber ignored or neglected.
Something for all.
Beautiful and Substantial Premniumnn
Standard Gold and otherWatches,Vali
Booksi, tho Best Family Sewing Xaddae
known to the trade, and an unequaled Ise
of objects of real utility and instrueto.
Rates, by Mail, Postpaid:
DAILY, per Year (without Sunday) $6 00
DAILY, per Month (without Sundar) 50
SUNDAY, per Year . . . 5 00
FOR EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR 7100
WEEKLY, per Year . . . 5 00
DRY GOODS
CARPETS
FOR
FALL AND WINTER
01
If you need any -ew Dry dood5
New CarpOts, New Mattings, New
Shadce, New Rugs, New Oitoloths
and New Gent's FurnMLg Good*
then
Is the plae to buy them. They have
the largest assortment, and the
prices they guarantee to be lower
than any other House. Their
European and American buyers re
port that they have purchased a
large Stock and Superior Quality of
Goods at very low prices, they hav
ing bought them before the recent
advance. The following area few
of the many bargains they ofer at
present:
One lot of English BROCADE DE
OODS at S2.
One lot of Changeable Drew Goods at Me.
One lot 34 Wool Cashmeres at Uc.
One case 64 French Dress Goods at 25c.,
worth 75o. These -goods-come in combina
tions.
500 pieceS of the latest Novelty Drew Goods
from 1234 to $.5
One lot of Real French and Italian Black and
Colored Silks at 75c., , $1.25 and $1.50. These
goods are imported by us, and other houses
pay more for them at wholesale in -New York
than we retal them here.
One lot of Black Surahs and Radramas at $1,
would be cheap atS1.2.
One case of Black and Colored, an-Sik V
vets at fic., better qualities in proportion.
Good Standard Prints at 4c. and 5c.
Best Quality Fall Sateen Chints at So.
0-inch Ane Ginghams at To.
Engngh Cretonnes at 17c., worth !6c., latest
de rge na
One case heavy Brown Canton Flannels at
~lecase extra heavy Brown Canton Flan
el at c.
One case Superior Brown Canton Flannels at
Good standr 3-4 Brown Shlrting at3%c.
Good standard 7-8 Brown Shirting at 4%c.
Good standard 4-4 Brown Shirting at 5c.
104 Brown Sheeting at 17c.
304 fine Bleached Sheeting at 20o., 220e. and
Blue al-wool Flannels at 19., 25c. and 36c.
Weguarantee that these Flannels are f0c. per
ard cheaper than they can be bought at any
other house.
A. good Jersey at 69c.
An all-wool Jersey for $1.23.
A fufl new line of Gents' ll Undershirts
and Unlaundried Shfrts wilibe sold at a great
saving to the purchaser.
Another lot of Gent'a Unlaundried Shirts at
47e.,5890. and 80e. Canot be duplicated In any
house for les than 15c. and $1.
A new line of Tweeds and nCimeres, very
cheap, direct from Saxonly.
S peces of Yac hacss from10~c. to 50c. per
yard. We have them In every eolor, plain and
Anwlne of Beaded and Steel Inees; also
lack and White Beadd Fronts.
A new lineof White Inoes, very cheap, in all
Ausv line of Antique Tidies at 1., worth
A new line of Bla+ Goods.
Something remarkable in Handkerehiefs.
0 dosen 3-4 Gent's Linen Handkerehlefr at
Iper dosen, worth $3. Other HandkerchIefs
lsen Indies' regular Balbriggan Hose,
Slk Clocked, at 20e.; also Ladles' Brown and
Pancy Balbriggan Hose at the low price of 23c.
ma~sn Chfidren's Imported Hose, fal
styles, at17c,19co.,28co. and 33c.
The following goods, which were slightly
damaged by the late cyclone, will be sold re
gardles ofcost:
A hltof~White Blankets at $1.90, *3.90, $4.85
and $5.90. The Elankets are worth double the
Olot of Red TwillFlannels at I5o., worth
One lot of fine Bl ehng at 5%c.
CARPET DEPARTMENTS
2,0008SHYBNA RUGS, in all sizes, at leusthan
the eastof the raw material. We bought these
~dfrom a manufacturer for net eash who
bepshdfor money.
One lot of full size Smra Rugs at $3, worth
New Carpets received and continually ar
Stvng n alictyles.
Jine Ingainsatlmo. and upwards.
Exra Supers at 65c. and upwards.
Yine ruel at 5c. and upwards.
our and five frame Body Brussels at $1.10
A ne line of Velvet Carpets' at Sig, last
vith Spring Bollerstat 890. each.
One Sot of Hassocks at25o.
Country~ercantswlfl do well toexnamine
our Stok before purehaslug their Fall bills.
Al retail orders promptly eptended to, and
samples sent on application.
Prtes rderng goods or samples will please
state In what paper they have seen our adver
tsement.
IoII Flii&oltl Beik
SENS1BLE PEOPLE
ARE NOT EASILY DECEIVED, FOR
they know quite well that good and bad
clothing are alike made to sell; and who
was ever known to advertise poor clothing?
They know how nearly all clothiers keep
the finest and sell-on paper-at less than
it cost to make them. Honest prices, well
made and nicely fitting clothes, together
with a good name (justly deserved), are
bound to tell.
The above being a fact, I state it merely
to enforce the point that I have ready for
inspection the largest and best assorted
stock of Fall and Winter Clothing for men,
youths and boys, that can be found in the
tate. Th are peerless in variety and
hones tl ood all the way through; even
the uner ings are shrunk and the trim
mings used are meant to wear, not merely
to help sell the goods, as every garment is
warranted as represented. There are un
assailable ramparts behind which I invite
you to deal. I am not here for a season
y; I am l'ere to stay. My stock this sea
son is the largest I have ever carried, and
it embraces every style and fashionable
garment that is made. I am willing to
compare them with the merchant tailor
work, and it is with real pleasure to .tate
that the business of this EMPORIUM OF
FASHION is steadily on the increase. My
large and constantly increasing patronage
testifies more forcibly than words than the
values offered by me are not equalled by
any house in the State.
To prove the truth of this I ask buyers
to make their own comparisons, as I enjoy
then a reputation above that and beyond
that of all clothiers in this vicinity at least
producing a superior class of regular
ailor-made Clothing and Gent:' Furnish
ing Goods, Hats and Fine Shoes. This is
the headquarters for the correct styles in
men's and boys' attire. All orders sent to
my care will romptly attended to.
pecu . L. KINARD.
Columbia, a. c.
F. N. WILSON.
INSURANCE AGENT,
MANNING, S. C.
Dec,17
W. E. BROWN,
Physician & Surgeon,
Offers hi rofessloza sericesto the peofle
XamIng and the surrounding country. Calsa
tended promptly night or day.
Offlaat Drag Stoe JS8
J. C. H. CLAUSSEN a CO.,
SteNm Baery ain Cady Factory,
C1A RLSTONi, S.C.
W. A. Reckling,
ARTIST,
1101 MAIN STREET,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
Portraits, Photographs, Ste
reoscopes, Etc.
OLD PICTUEES COPIED AND ENLARoED.
Sept16
EDEL BRS.
RICHMOND, VA.,
Manufacturers of
Tobacco & Cigars,
SAnd Wholesale Liquor De alers.
FOR
WALL PAPERS, CORNICES,
CORNICE IPOLES,
WINDOW SHADES,
LACE CURTAINS.
Call at the Leadilng House inthe State for these
kind of goods.
J. II. D.&vs' Carpet Store,
COLUMBIA, s. C.
Bruel and oI Capts selected especiallyfo
the Fall trade have already arrived and many
others on t he way.
1,000 Smyrna Rugs
And Mats. all New Patterns, also a fune selec'
tion of
Brussels Rugs and Mats.
Ccaand Napler Mattiags, new stocc jt in
Notice is given to the public that I
have secured the avency for this Coun'
ty to sell John P. boy d's work on the
Life of Grant, I will take pleasure in
supplying any one wishing to purchase.
'BOYCE NELSON~,
Sept2 MANNING, S. C.
WELL CLEANING
CHEAPLY DONE
Apply to
BOYCE NELSON,
MNN G,'S.
CAN'T BE BEAT
THE D3IVN WELL MA IT EASY to ge#
Water.
No Well Cleaning. Cheap I Durable I
CALL ON
T. C. oca1Te,
SUMTEB, . 0.
JACOBI HOUSE,
FLORENCE, S. C.
M. JACOBI. AGT.,
FROPEIETOR.
WtL'vcry Stable in connection, Fab 25
COLEMAN'S HOTEL,
Kingstree, S. C.
MRS. S. A. ST. JOHN,Sole Proprietress.
Board f2 per day. The Hotel has recently
been thoroughly repaired and refarnished
with all modern appliances of a first-class
hotel. Saloon, Billiard and Pool Rooms
and Feed Stables. The proprietress re
turns thanks for the liberal patronage here
tofore bestowed, and will continue to main
tain the high character which the Hotel
has always enjoyed.
GRAND CENTRAL
HOTEL,
Co1umzbia, a. a.
U. K FISHER, Prop'r.
NOTICE TO FARMERS.
I respectfully call to the attention of the
Farmers of Clarendon the fact that I have
secured the Agency for the Corbin Disk
Harrow, Planet Jr. Horse Hoe and Culti
vator, Johnson Harvester and the Conti
nental Reappr. I have one of each of these
Istruments for disniay at my stables, and
will take pleasure in showing and explain
ng their utility. No progressive farmer
san aford to do without these implements.
W. K. BELL, Agt.,
Apri5 Manning, . 0.
Notice T
FIRST CLASS BARBER SHOP In the
rear of the store lately occupied by Mr. F.
C. Thomas. Work done in the latest
s tyles. Hair-cutting, Shavint Shampco
Ing, and Hair and Moustache yeing. La
dies waited upon at their residences. Chil
uren's Hair-cutting, and Razor Sharpening
m specialty. T. T. EDWARDS, Artist
Apri Manning, S. C.
Notice T
I desire to call to the attention of the Mill
en and Cotton Planters of Clarendon,
that I have secured the agency for this
County. for the DANIEL PRATT RE
VOLVING HEAD GIN. Having used
this Gin for several years I can recommend
it as the best Gin now in use. Any infor
mation in regard to the Gin will be cheer
fully given. I can also supply the people
of Clarendon with any other machinery
which they may need, at the lowest prices.
Parties wishing to purchase gins will find
it to their interest to give their ordes early.
WV. SCOTT HAILYIN,
May 5 Manning, 1- C.
HIP, HIP,
HURRAH!
-FOR THE
Oldlreidoll SIlJOR
Who keeps Liquors of all sorts.
MANNING, S. C.
SEE HIS SELECTED STOCK OF
WHISKIES, WINES, ETC.
The best at low prices to suit the times.
[ have oin hand the greatest varicty (fo
TOBACCO IN TOWN.
LAG-ER BEER.
Cigars of all Brands and in fact
Iverything kept in a first-class Saloon.
Being acquainted with the people of
this county for the last twenty-five
years, I understand their wants and
-eep goods to suit them. W MY
PERSONAL ATTENTION GIVEN
r CUSTOMERS.
PLAIN AND FANCY DRINKS.
W FREE POOL on a Fine Pool
able.
W Remember the Place. .2
M. SCHWARTZ is the spot, whcre
he best and cheapest liquors can be
got.
Dec17
- advertiser to con
ofth costof adverlsng.'lheadvertlserwh
rmtion he ries. wh dfri hen
invest one hundre thousand dollars in ad
*etisia schem* Ism ndicate d wiw
espec. 14 ed tions hav been IssueY.
Sent post-paid. to ay addres fr 10 cents.
Wm. Shepherd & Co.,
128 MEETING STREET,
CHA RTESTON-, SO. CA.
STOVES,
STOVES, STOVES
-AT
WHOLESALE
ETAILf
-o -
Tinwares, House Furnishing Goods,
Potware, Kitchen and Stove Utensils.
m Send for Price List and Cireuak__
lars.
TO THE
PEOPLE OF CLARENDON CO
-0-o
C. MAYHEW & SON.
COLUMBIA AND ORAINGEBURG.
WORKS.
kiManufactrr of and Dealers inal
MARBLE WORK.
W Granite Quarries near Winns
boro, South Carolina.
Country orders prom tly attended
to, and designs furnisheJon applica
tion.
Jan21
A WARM
WELCOME
AWAITS YOU AT
"The Maning Palace."
--
S. oRkoNSkie, Agt
OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE,
MANNING, SOUTH CAROLINA.
Regardless of the high license he
sells the very FINEST BRANDS of
LIQUORS, WINES and BEER
REMEMBER
The best LIQUORS for Less Money
than anywhere else.
PLIQUOE FOR MDICINAL PUR
Agent for the leading Cigars of the
State. The John McCullough and the
Eagle Brand; also the largest and finest
stock of other Clzars and Tobacco in
town.
BILLIARDS AND POOL.
On first-class tables, with separate
room for colored people.
HOT FANCY DRINKS.
He begs to tender his thanks to his
friends and patrons and asks a continu
ance of the same.
Come one! Come all!!
rW Remember that Polite Clerks
serve you and every attention shown.
when he introduced resolutions o
respect to the memory of Mr. Arthm
Harvin. his deceased predecessor, anc
supported them with a few well choser
and feeling remarks.
The anti-Prohibitionists scored E
victory in the indefinite postponemenl
of the bill from the last session "t<
prohibit the sale of spirituous and mall
liquors within the county of Colleton.'
There was no discussion on the sub
ject. "A bill to regulate the granting
of liquor licenses within incorporatec
aities and towns" was passed ovei
without action, as was also a bill tc
prohibit the sale of liquor in the towr
f Jonesville, Union county. There
ire several other prohibition bills or
the Calendar and several additiona:
bills bearing upon the subject arf
looked for during the session.
NOTES OF THE SESSION.
Concerning the proposed census, ii
is naturally inquired how it will affecl
representation from the several coun
ies. Taking the United States census
)f 1880 as the basis of the new appor
tionment, it was found that changes
would occur in eleven counties. ThE
:ounties which would gain Representa.
ives would be Beaufort, Edgefield,
Greenville, Laurens, Marlboro, Spar.
tanburg and Sumter, who would gai
ne Representative each. Charlestor
xnd Berkeley combined, which now
ave seventeen delegates, would lose
rour, and Aiken, Hampton and Rich.
Land one each. Under this schedule
it is estimated that Charleston would
ave seven and Berkeley sir Represen
atives, but this estimate would per.
aps be increased by a new census is
Darleston, where it is said that the
population now numbers over 60,000.
[n this connection Captain Dennis, oi
Berkeley, was asked how about his bill
.o transfer the sea islands from Berke.
ey to Charleston. To this he replied
hat the bill had been passed over al
,he suggestion of Col. Simonton with
view of having a conference of the
wo delegations. The Berkeley dele.
ration favor the transfer (with one ex
.eption) and the Charleston delegatios
it present oppose it.
The are on the House Calendar a
mumber of what are known as "Liquor
)ills." One Qf them, a bill to prohibit
;he sale of liquors in Colleton county,
as indefinitely postponed without
iscussion or division. Mr. Petti
rew's bill to regulate the granting o1
icenses in incorporated towns and
ities was passed over temporariiy.
his bill takes away the power of the
,ranting of licenses from the munici
Sal authorities and vests it in the coun
ly commissioners, the license fee-not
ess than $200-to be paid to the use
>f the county. The bill to prohibit the
ale of liquors in the town of Jones
rille, Union county, was passed over.
he bill (Senator Biemanu's) to repeal
he Act to prohibit the sale of spiritu
>s liquors in Oconee county, has not
ret been reached. It passed the Sen
te last session and failed by two votes
n the House on a motion made on the
ast night of the session to take it up
>t of its order. A bill will be intro
lced to repeal the Prohibition law in
Barnwell county. An attempt will
Llso 3e made to pass bills allowing the
Qranting of licenses in Berkeley and
harleston counties.
The Senate has decided to postpone
he judicial elections for the present.
here is no oppqsition to any of the
resent Judges save in two cases. The
riendsof Gen. Moore have determined
o brig his name out for the position
>f J of the Second circuit against
ndge ldrich. The friends of Judge
ksher, who is a probable candidate,
iad determined not to bring him out
igainst Judge Aldrich, but the action
f the supporters of Gen. Moore may
etermine them to a differeat course.
b is mentioned in the lobbies that Ccl.
[ohn F. Ficken may be brought out as
. candidate for the Bench in the First
ircuit in opposition to Judge Pressley,
yt no authoritive announcement so
:hat effect has as yet been made.
The indefinite postponement of the
livorce bill is informally discussed.
Some significance was attached to
hzis- for the reason that the author of
;he bill, a young member from Fair
eld, made the motion for postpone.
nent. This was explained by the fact
;hat he has been married since the last
ession. _______
Hiotels in America.
The ruling idea in America is that
whatever a guest can possibly want is
o be ready waiting for him at all hours
>f the day or night. From 6 o'clock in
the morning till bedtimo he can eat.
Be it breakfast, lunch, dinner or sup.
oer, there will be something on the
able. In order to post his letters or
to buy a paper or to telephone to a
riend or to send a message, he has on
Ly to walk into the main hall. For a
wash, a shave, boot-.cleaning, hair
dressing or the relief of his corns, he
has merely to sit down on a chair and
the appropriate artist will be at his
ide in a minute. They all understand
their business, whatever it may be,
nd no time or labor is wasted in ex
planations. The guest knows before
handh his own share of the programme
-what he will have to oat, where he
will have to sleep, and to a cent what
he will have to pay. In the best
managed hotel's on our own side of the
Atlantic the element of strangeness
and uncertainty has not yet been alto
ther eliminated. A person nevez
ows exactly what may happen tc
him; how he may be treated, or whal
he may he charged even at the house
which he frequents habitually. .But the
American hotel sets your mind at rest
forthwith. For so many dollars pei
day you are free of the house and all
its privileges, which, apart from the
eating and sleeping, are very eonoldern
able.-Backwoo'd's Miagazine.
The coyote has changed his habits if
not his Iskin, according to a Western
correspondent, one of thomn ehaving
treed a man and hept him there until
rescued by a party of hunters. Hither.
to the eoyote has been regarded as per.
fectly harmless.
A pickle famine is threatened this
winter. The present supply at the
East is set down at 80,000000-one
haif only of what is needed for the
Eastern trade. The Western crops
have suffered, and heavy advances in
priesar o1okar1 for.

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