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The Manning times. (Manning, Clarendon County, S.C.) 1884-current, January 13, 1886, Image 1

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O. MANING, CLARNDON COUNTY. S. C., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBE
S6-O'nt inurie% g~te~I by the? Close of
the ear
Up to the pre-ent monuth the farmer
has been lookii fo ward. The con
summation of his pla Z, the final out
come of his labor an oil, in the shape
of cotton bales and o er crops, have
been the objective po zs before him
Now, these cease to 1 matters of ex
pection and become Ittcrs of fact.
We hope hi expec: ionS have not
been too large and hi rOps too small;
we trust that having z, rv wiseiv, he
has reaned bountifully. But, however,
well he has done, he 1 ght have done
better; farming has n.j reached per
fection and - retr04pec( may be very
useful. Let us go bacl together and
review the vear's wor Looking at
it now in the light of re, Its, was your
vear's work well pilaied? In the
first place was the wot undertaken
proportionate to your mans: did you
attempt to do more ths you could
well manage: did you aetpt to do
more than vou could %4] manage;
did vou have enough hge-power to
work to best advantage; d You make
all thesub-titution possiblof machines
and horse-power in pi e of more
costly human power: did -on spread
out the manure von over too
many acres: did You b fertilizers
judiciously and economic y; did You
cultivate vonr land so a,. to save it
from washing, and is it in Ltter condi
tion how than it was a yee ago; how
is the balance-sheet betw expense
and receipts?
Endeavor to answer th questions
in a calm, candid spirit, 1 ing aside
all conceit and pride of o ion. Do
not attribute to seasons i at might
have been prevented by fu sight and
energy on Your part. t an old
trick of farmers to explain failures
by laying them at the do of bad
seasons. Difficulties ocen i every
occupation: the successful n is he
who anticipates, provides fo nd over
comes them.
But to our* questions. s your
work well planned; did 1 have
fixed plans or did you just aloug
as weather and circunistan uggest
ed? To illustrate: There certain
kinds of work which can ne on
wet days and when the gro is too
wet to plow-goingz to mil auling
manure, gathering litter, ham wood
making composts, etc. vou
always look ahead and ar e, So
that 'any of these, which of essity
must be done, were done a:it ut of
the way when the time fo wing
came?' When the period fol nting
a crop drew nigh and prepai for
it could not be deferred, di'l find
you with composts in sacks , rrels
already hauled out and di uted
conveniently about the fields ' trich
they were applied, or were y-c. ams
s topIped then .todo hauling w. ery
animal xhould have been hito to a
plow? Ha~d you studied out t. ully
the best appliances and mo- pe
dios method of putting out os sts,
and was everything ready to the
work i apidly and well? If y nd
was rolli:iaud the rows had i n
on a level, as they always sh< e,
had von established your lines. eis
or guides, or had the plownes e
times to wait tor vou to run o d
if the hurry was ver: great, v e
rows run by guess and theret -
perfectly: was the quantity of -t
to be applied to an acre deci. ,
and were there ony arrangenr o
guage it ? A most excelleut p'tr o
make a mnemoeandum in adv&G f
.all work to be done, adding - p
anything that may be suggesm'
.daily obse5 ation and expe,'. .
.Consider this list carefully and e
lish the o~der in which the var
items are 'to be executed, and ret
the mnemoranldumf accordingly.
recasting should be done several ti~
in the course or a year, as circ
stances may unavoidably interfere4
necessitate changes.
Was the work undertaken propi
tionate to your means; did you ha
funds in hand (working capital) su
cient to pay for all tihe labor need
all the supplies, all the fertilizers,
ali the implements which could
profitably used, or did you have
place yourself at the mercy of nr
chants and dealers and obligate yo
self to pay fifty to one hundred
cent. more for suich things than t:
could be had for cash? Do vou th
yon can make such large percenta
~on money need in farming? It
doubtful if there has been an aver
of eight per cent. made by fara
during the last ten years. Scar<
any legitimate business pays more t
that. 'If you did not have the nlece
ry working - ital to cultivate as m
.as you did', s woave beeni sa
it would have be tter to I
undertaken less. Wha- profit
pleasure is there iu cultivating th
or forty or fifty miore additional ac
the whole yield of which, and ir
too, must go to Mr. Merchant?
has been tersely and aptly said,
simply make yourself the mnercha
overseer over free Negroes, wil
g-uarantee that they shall make hlit
many bales of cotton. Ilad you
better save yourself the wvorry
vexation of spirit; had you not b<
let your land rest and recuperatei
money can be borrowed at seven
cent.,'with a reasonable prospeci
making ten peCr cent. on its use,
'might be juistified in borrowing;
ho0w is it when money is borrowe
fifty per cent., with a very cem
prospect of not making more
eight or ten per cent. with it? ]
not passing strange that year:
vear men will make such ventit
1-labit and a blind, unreasonable
alone must lead them to do it. T
have been contraction anid shrin
in almost everyv business-let far
follow the good example also.
down the number of acres cuiltive
especially in case of crops that re<
much work; make up your mm
strike the first blow at the cotton:
It has made von tile slave of the
chant and placed yon at the mer<
the negro. Strike for indepen(
of both. Select thle best land you
especially that which is rich in htu
and concentrate upon a few acrel
the labor of preparation and
mannre you cani get and give the
for two bales to the acre insLCad 01
two acres to the bale. If you can
make it, there will be some profit ;
there ir certainly little or none in the
extensive system you have followed
for years past.
THE AMERICAN BUDGET.
Estimates of the Money Needed to Run
Our Government One Year.
The secretary of the treasury has
estimates of the appropriations re
quired for the fiscal year ending June
30, 1887. The total amount estimated
as required for all the expenses of the
Government is $339,580,552, Nvhich is
$15,678,158 more than the sun called
for in the estimates submitted last
year, and $5,826,710 more than the
aggregate of the appropriations for
present fiscal year. The estimates for
1886 were $3-3,911,394 and the appro
priations for the same year were $288,
762,842. The estimates for 1887 are
made up of'fe following items: Leg
islative establishment $3,275, 828, ex
ecuture $18,491,311, judicial $408,300,
foreign intercourse $1,704,961, military
$25,680,495, navalS30,836,357, Tndians
$6,051,259, pensions $75,830,200, putb
lie works $26,860,016, postal $7,443,
914, miscellaneous $24,195,951, per
tranent annual appropriations $118,
910,955. The estimates given above,
except the legislative, judicial foreign
intercourse and miscellaneous, are for
larger sums than those appropriated
for use during the present fiscal year.
The appropriations for pensions for
the present year amounted to $60,000,
847, for military $24,349,507, naval
$21,697,729, public works $8,926,829,
postal service $6,211,58e. The differ
ences between the estimates for the
executive establishment, for Indian
affairs, miscellaneous and permanent
appropriations and appropriations
mad$ for the present year are trifling.
Among the estimates under the head
ot' public works are the following:
Court-house, Chattanooga, $100,000;
court-house, Macon, Ga., $50,000;
kiillsboro Inlet light station, Fla.,
$9,000; Norfolk navy yard, $983,869.
THE ATLANTA WHISKEY SUIT.,.
Judge McCay Decides all the Points in
Favor of the Prohibitionists.
Last Thnrsday morning in the U ni
ted States Court Judge McCay decided
the contested election ease growing
out of the recent Prohibition election
in Fulton county. He had previously
granted a temporary order restraining
the ordinary from announcing the
result of the election which was in
favor of prohibition. The Judge re
fused to continue the injunction, de
ciding the case against the liquor men
on every point.
There is in the bill adopted a pro
vision that Georgia wines may be sold,
but as wines from other States were
excluded, that portion of the bill Judge
McCav decides to be unconstitutional,
and tiat no wines can be sold.
Judge Marshall J. Clark, of Fulton
County Superior Court, has granted a
temporary injunction to restrain Or
dinary Calhoun from announcing the
result of the Prohibition election. He
set Monday last to hear argument on
the question of making the injunction
perpetual.
A DREADFUL ACCIDENT.
Ten Persons Killed and Nine Wounded on
a Georgia Railroad.
A fearful and fatal accident occur
red on the Georgia Pacific railroad
about 11:30 o'clock on the night of the
14th inst. The accident occurred sev
eteen miles from Atlanta at what is
called the Seventeen Mile water tank.
Ten persons were killed and nine
wounded. The accident was caused
by an East Tennessee train telescop
ing the Georgia Pacific train. The
East Tennessee trains have the right
of-way over the Georgia Pacific track
as far as Austell. The Georgia Pacific
pulled out of the depot on the fatal
night at 10 o'clock. At 10:45 the East
Tennessee pulled out. The Georgia
Pacific train stopped at the water tank
and while taking in water the East
Tennessee came up behind and ran
into the rear end of the Georgia Pacific
rain.
The Southern Forestry Congress.
~The session of the Southern States
orestry Congress at Defuniak, Fla.,
Pst week, was largely attended by
9elegates from Florida and the neigh
"ring Southern States and from
gortherni States. Interest ini forestry,
?shown by the large delegation of
D'~resentative men, has more than
e lfilled the expectations of Governor
el ~rrv, Patron of this first Southern
a restrv Congress. An interesting
~sa' ture of the exercises was the plant
uc and dedication of trees in a na
v v in the Union. In the circle of
md ionor live oak trees were dedicated,
;rty ,h imposing ceremonies, to Oliver
res, idell Holmes, Whittier, Paul
ore ne, E. S. Jaffray, Baroness Bur
As eCoutts and H. B. Claimn.
lit'S IHappy Thought In the Night.
b a ' r years Mr. Jas. R. Ackley, of
I so West Fayette street, Baltimore,
not auffered with neuralgia so that he
nd hardly sleep. But he writes,
tter night I was suffering very much
If ~e thought struck me that Brown's
per itters would do me some good,
0f erhaps cure me. It was a happy
oe ht, and to my great joy it has
but Iv cured me after using two bot
at t After three monshs I have had
taina rn of the symptoms. I cheer
ha f commend it as the best tonic I
it h en used." Neuralgia sufferers,
ifter It e hint!
res?|
nope Sdniate has passed the Presi
here d succession bil'l as reported by
taeth mttee of the Senate. Mr.
nesDoout Carolina, has intro
Cut d bill in the House providing
Lted, fo same contingencies by way of
ire v or a second Vice-President
ni to w 11 be voted for by the Electors,
leld. sai -President to preside over the
er- Se the absence of the first Vice
y of Pr t.
Lence
iave, Perryman, colored, and hem
nutw rn, aged respectively 8 and
of it I10 .were brutally murdered by
the jSa son, colored, at Laurens
crop iMi ilson fled, but was capturec
-im j and ed.
An En::'.h "Piratc."
General Lewis Wallace, late Minister
to Turkey. and author of several popu
lar novels, was telling tme recently of
some experiences in London which
beautifully illustrate the relations of
publishers and authors of this country
and England. What he relates is a
strong arzunent in favor of interna
tional copyright. -' found on reach
ing Loudon about ten months ago,"
said General Wallrce. "that mv novel
of 'Ben Hur' was advertised by Messrs.
F. WarNte & Co. as from the pr:sses.
They also advertise themselves as
agents of the Century Company of this
city, and I find by looking at the mag
azine that they are so recognized by
the publishers here. Of course I knew
I had no legal rights in England, but
I was naturally curious to know some
thing of the style in which the book
was reproduced in England, the char
acter of the house printing it, and
something about the success which it
had met with abroad. So I called at
their place and asked a clerk if he had
a novel called "Ben Hur." He handed
me a copy, price two shillings, and I
paid him for it.
I asked several questions which led
naturaliy to the inquiry as to what sale
the English edition had met with.
The clerk told me that they had sold
2,000 copies in te past fortnight-a
thousand a week. That was flatter
ing, and I told him I was glad to hear
it, as I was the author. "Indeed!" he
exclaimed; ar.d at the samo moment
he reached out and took b.iek the
volume he ha.d sold me. He then
asked mo if I would not remain where
I was for a moment. He disappeared,
and returned in a moment without my
book. Lut with a request that I would
see the principals of the house. I was
very ;:ad to do so. and going into the
privaie ollice I met two gentlemen
wa:' were intro.luced to me as mem
bers of the firm. My bought copy of
nim stolcn book iay on the table, and I
took it up in the course of the conver
sation which followed and glanced at
it a.; we talked.
At first the coniversation was pleas
ant enough, but glancing at the title
page f found that the sub-title had
bern changed trom "A Tale of the
Carist" to "Tihe Days of Christ."
That was annoying, and I asked who
had authorized the change. The re
ply was that the publishers had done
it to avoid hurting the sensibilities of
religious readers in England. In other
words, they had appropriated my prop
erty and had chanred it to suit their
own views of what its language and
tone should be. "Have you made any
other of these unauthorized changes?"
I asked. '-Well, we have omitted two
of the tales told by one of the char
acters," answered the speaker of the
firm. You can imagine I was getting
warmed up by this time, and I spoke
rather strongly. But the next dis
covery enraged me beyond measure.
They had actually written up and in
serted a preface to the novel. No, not
a publisher's preface. It was without
signature of any sort, and to the ordin
ary reader must have read it as if by
the author. I have written no preface
whatever. I demanded to know of
them what they proposed to do in the
way of remunerating me for taking
and for altering my book. They
promised to Five the matter due con
sideration. That was ten months ago,
and I have never heard from them."
V. Y. Tribune.
How Nuqted U-"d the Gavel.
"I make no seret of acknowledging
just where I learned to use the gavel,"
Gen. Husted went on to say. "It was
in the Masonic lodge. I divulge no
unrevealed mystery of the order when
I say that the gavel is nowhere so su
preine as in the Grand lodge. It is
supremacy itself. To it the delegates
bend as quickly as privates in a great
army, as the members of every parlia
mentary or deliberative body should.
I remember an incident ia my career
at Albany which is timely here. It is
customary when the exigencies of busi
ness-as in the case of the election of
regents of the university of the state of
Nev York or United States senators
call the senate and assembly into joint
session, for the lower to receive the
upper house in its chamber. The
courtesies and customs of these ses
sions demand that on the entrance of
the senate the assembly shall rise. On
several occasions before I first' became
speaker of the assembly, I had wit
nessed those ceremonies. I recalled
the fact that in each case the speaker,
when the senate was at the door, re
quested the assembly to rise. To my
notion this was exceedingly undignified
and reflected on the deportment of the
assembly, who ought to know its duty
as well as its presiding officer. 'Think
how agentleman would feel walking into
a drawing-room to be told that he must
not spit on the Iloor. I resolved that
if I ever became speaker, and I am free
to confess I had no doubt of it, things
would be dil~erentiy done. During my
first term a joinit session became neces
sary. The looked-for opportunity was
at hand- On the day tixed and at the
hour the sergeant-at-arms announced
the arrival of thme senate in the usual
form. During tho pause which fol
lowed I raised my gavel, and looking
calmly at the house brought it down
three times in sajccessioni. The next
moment seventy-tivo men were on their
feet. and naturally thiose who did not
respond at once arose by insl'ir:.tion.
A s~ngle biow later on, when t ue senate
was received, brought the whoie as
sembly to a sitting posture. After ad
journment an ex-speaker camne to me
to find out how it happened that the
assembly arose without the usual re
quest. 1' asked the members to rise,'
said. 'No,' my inquisitive predeces
sor said, 'you didn't, for not a word
was said.' ''But,' I added, -1 made the
sual request with my gavel. You
heard the three blows?' -1s that a
Masonic sign?' he asked curiously. 'I
did not say so,' was my respouse. The
gavel at any rate had don:. the talk
.1he lareSt andi prob)ay thme oldest
1. tree a thie v.~rki, standing in the
garien of dihe Capucin Mlonastery at
jise'ti. is :mbo'ut to ye sold. It was
Isia:.: in 16:21. Its branches cover a
space of 484 squiare meters-sufficient
to selter 200 persons.
-Subscriptions to the Grant monu
ment are coming in at the rate of about
$1,000 a week. At this rate it wii
take about twenty years to ra'se the
required sum, and by that tim- ther,
is reason to fear that the New Yorkers
will have forgotten what it was raized
for.
YOU COULD NOT
IF YOU WOULD
Be more fashionably dressed than in one
of my Four-Buttoned Cutaway Cork-Screw
Suits. Not only is the style the most pop
ular for street and business wear, but the
material is elegant in apearance and mod
erate in price. Ihave all the leading styles
and novelties of season, such as Square
Cut Sacits, One and Four-Buttoned Cuta
ways in fancy worsted, Cheviots and Cas
simeres. Prince Alberts in diagonal,
worsted, cork-screw, whipcord and granite.
My assortment is large and greatly ad
mired for beauty and fit, as well as the
make and trimming. It is necessary to see
these goods to appreciate them.
I have also a ine of Gents' Furnishing
Goods-for assortment, styles and prices
cannot be equaled in the citty. Also a
well selected stock of Hats and Gents'
Fine Shoes of every style that beggars de
scription. When in the city call and see
this magniacent stock of Gents' Outfits,
and I am sure you will be pleased with
the result of your inspection.
Al' orders addressed to my care will re
ceive prompt attention.
Respectfully,
.K. L. KINARD,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
F. N. WILSON.,
INSUB1ANCE AGENT,
KANNING, S. C.
Dec 17
W. Es BROWN,
Physician & Surgeon,
Offers his professional services to the people of
Manning and the surrounding country. Calls at
tended iromptly night or day.
Omece at Drug Store. j 8
J. C H. CLAUSSEN & CO.,
StRe BdkerJ Emd Ca~iJ FaGtory,
CHABLESTON, 8. C.
W. A. Reckling,
ARTIST,
1101 MAIN ST REET,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
Portraits, Photographs, Ste
reoscopes, Etc.
OLD PICTURES COPIED AND ENLARGED.
8ept 16
EDEL BROS.,
RICHMOND, VA.,
Manufacturers of
Tobacco & Cigars,
And Wholesale Liquor Dealers.
FOR
WALL. PAPERS, CORNICES,
CORNICE POLES,
WINDOW SHADES,
LACE CURTAINS.
Call at the Leading House in the State for these
aind of goods.
J. H. Dxvis' Carpet Store,
CoL.UMBI., S. C.
Severa new dsgns in Tapestry, BrueP bod
tl:e Fall tratie nave already arrived anil many
ichers on 'he way.
1,000 Smyrna Rugs
And Mats, a:1 New Patt- ra, also a fine selec
Brussels Rugs and Mats.
Coon and Na->ier .Mantings. new stoc:-9- m 1:
- - dvertiser to con
oftheecostof adve:rtising.h advrti aw
rmnt to spen one dolr eds in thbe in
*".*atin eeqes. n *eori *oi
meet his every requirement, or ca be md
respondence. 13 edtions ave been issued.
Sent post-paid. to any addres fr 10 cents.
DRY GOODS
.&W
CARPETS
FOR
FALL AND WINTER
If you need any New Dry Goods,
New Carpets, New Mattings, New
Shades, New Rugs, New Oilcloths
and New Cent's Furnishing Goods,
then
FR,
& MUE
Is the place to buy them. They have
the largest assortment, and the
prices they guarantee to be lower
than any other House. Their
European and American buyers re
port that they have purchased a
large Stock and Superior Quality of
Goods at very low prices, they hav
ing bought them before the recent
advance. The following are a few
of the many bargains they offer at
present:
One lot of English BROCADE DRESS
GOODS at 20c.
One lot of Changeable Dress Goods at 20.
One lot 3-4 Wool Cashw -es at le.
One case 64 French Dress Goods at 25c.,
worth 75c. These goods come In combina
tions.
500 pieces of the Latest Novelty Dress Goods
from 12% to $1.25.
One lot of Real French and Italian Black and
Colored Silks at 75c., $1, $1.25 and $1.50. These
goods are imported by us, and other houses
pay more for them at wholesale in New York
than we retail them here.
One lot of Black Surabs and Radzamaa at $1,
would be cheap at $125.
One case of Black and Colored, all-Silk V
vets at 97c., better qualities in proportion.
Good Standard Prints at 4c. and Sc.
Best Quality Fall Sateen Chintz at 8c.
30-inch fine Ginghams at ,c.
English Cretonnes at 17c., worth 35c., latest
designs.
One case heavy Brown Canton Flannels at
8%c.
One case extra heavy Brown Canton Flan
esRa at 8c.
One case Superior Brown Canton Flannels at
1A-., 21c.and 35c.
Good standard 3- Brown Shirting at 3%c.
Good standard 7-S Brown Shirting at 4%c.
Good standard 4-4 Brown Shirting at 5c.
10-4 Brown Sheeting at17c.
104 fine Bleached Sheeting at 20c., 23c. an'!
Blue all-wool Flannels at 19c., 25c. and 35c.
We guarantee that these Flannels are 10c. per
yard cheaper than they can be bought at any
other house.
A good Jersey at 69c.
An all-wool Jersey for $1.23.
A full new line of Gents' Fall Undershirts
and Unlaundried Shirts will be sold at a great
saving to the purchaser.
Another lot of Gent's Unlaundried Shirts at
47.,50c. and S9c. Cannot be duplicated in any
house for less than 75e. and $1.
A new line of Tweeds and Cassimeres, very
cheap, direct from Saxony.
200 pieces of Yac Iaces from 10c. to 50c. per
yard. We have them in every color, plain and
tinseled.
A new line of Beaded and Steel Laces ; also
Black and White Beaded Fronts.
A new line of White Laces, very choap, in all
styles.
A new line of Antique Tidies at 110., worth
A new line of Black Goods.
Something remarkable in Handkerchiefs.
50 dozen 3-4 Gent's Linen Handkerchiefs at
$1 per dozen, worth $3. Other Handkerchiefs
in proportion.
100 dozen Ladles' regular Balbriggan Hlose.
Bilk Clocked, at 23c.; also Ladies' Brown and
ancy Balbriggan Hose at the low price of '23c.
per pair.
500 dozen Children's Imported Hlose, fall
styles, a l'ic., 19c., 23c. and 33c.
The following goods, whic~I were slightly
damaged by the late cyclone, will be sold re
gardless of cost:
A let of White Blnkets at $1.90, $3.90, $4.d
and $5.90. The Blankets are worth double the
money.
One lot cf Red Twill Flannels at 25c., worth
One lot of fine Bleaching at 5%c
CARPET DEPARTMENT.
1,000 SMYRNA RUGS, in all sizes, at less than
the cost of the raw material. We bought these
goods from a manufacturer for net cash, who
has been pushed for money.
One lot of full size Swyrna Rugs at $3, worth
New Carpets received and continually ar
rivng in all ctyles.
Fne Ingrains at 25c. and upwards.
Extra Supers at 65c. and upwards.
Fine Brussels at (I5o. and upwards.
Four and flvc frame Body Brussels at $1.10
and $1.25.
A new line of Velvet Carpets at 3%4. last
year's price $2.
500 pair of fine Dade Shades, new patterns
with Spring Rollers, at 89c. each.
One lot of Hassocks at 25c.
Country Merchants will do well to examnine
our Stock before purchasing their Fall biill.
All retail orders promptly attended to. and
samples sent on application.
Parties ordering goods or samples will please
stae In what paper they have seen our advcr
tsement.
I01111. FrlC1INO & EDtit
CAN'T BE BEA'Tf
THE DRIVEN WELL MAKES IT EASY t:, ger
Water.
3o Well Cleaning. Cheap I Durable!
CALL ON
TM. C. MavTe,
SUMTER, S. C.
JACOBI HOUSE,
FLORENCE S. C.
M. JACOBI. AGT.,
PROPRIETOR.
W"'very Sta!ue in connection, Fe) 5
COLMVIAN'S HOTEL,
Kingstree, S. C.
MIS. S. A. ST. JOHN.Sole Proprietress.
Board -2 per day. The Hotel has recent!
been thoroughly repaired and refurni.-hid
with all modern appliances of a tirsr-class
hotel. Saloon, Billiard and Pool Ioums
and Feed Stables. The prop'rietrests re
turns thanks for the liberal parrounge herv.
tofore bestowed, and will continue to mall
tain the high character which the Ho:ei
has always enjoyed.
GRAND CENTRAL
HOTEL,
Colu.bia, 8. 0.
U. U. FISHER, Prop'r.
NOTICE TO FARMERS.
I respectfully call to the att-ention of .lah
Farmers or Clarendon the fact tbn I a
secure' the Agency for the Corbin. l)Ask
Harrow, Planet Jr. Horse Hoe anti Culti
vator, Johnson Harvester and the Co ',I
nentalReaper. 1baveoneofeach f11i ~
instruments for display at my stables,
will take pleasure in showing and xp1l:ai:
ing their utility. No progre.sive a4.:..
can afford to do without these implemems.,.
W. K. BELL, Agt.,
Apr15 Manning, S. C.
W. F. B. HAYNSWORTH, Sumter, S. C.
B.S. DNxsxs, Manning, S. C.
HAYNSWORTH & DINKINS,
ATUORNEYS AT LAW,
MANNING, S. C.
JOHN S. WILSON,
Attorney and Counsellor at
Law,
MANNING, S, C, jann
J. E. SCOTT,
Attorney and Counsellor at
Law,
MANNING, S. C. re!.25
A. LEVI,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MANNING,. .
Notary Pttblic with Seal. MehlS
HIP, HIP,
HURRAH!
-FOR TH1E
Who keeps Liquors of all sorts.
MANNING, S. C.
SEE ILS SELECTED STOCK OF
WHISKIES, WINES, ETC.
The best at low prices to suit the times.
I have on hand the greatest variety fo
TOBACCO IN TOWN.
L A iE R B E ER.
Cigars of all Bratnds and in fatt
everything kept in a lirst-class Saloon.
Being acquainted with the peole of
this county for the last twenty-Iive
yars, I understand their wants and
keep goods to suit them. W MY
PERSONAL ATTENTION GIVEN
TO CUSTOMERS.
PLAIN AND FANCY DRINKS.
!gi FREE POOL on a Fine Pool
Table.
W Remember the Place. .3
M. SCHWARTZ is the spot, where
the best and cheapest liquors can be
got.
Dec17
Notice !
I desire to call to the attention 'f the M ill
Men and Cotton P!.iers of Ciarndon,
that I havo secuired the agency for this
County. for the D)ANI EL PRlATT RzE
VOLVING HF EAD GIN. llaving us:d
this Gin tor several yer I~ can recommnua
it as the best Gin now. in use. Anyv infor
manion in regatrd to the tiu will be cheer
fully given. I cnm a -o supp.ly thw e p pie
of Go.rndnu with ny iv. .r m~iacho.rry
Wm. Shph & DQ.,
128 MEETING STREET,
CHARLESTON. SO. CA.
STOVES,
STOVES, STOVES
-AT
WHOLESALE
AND
RETAIL
-o -
Tinwares, House Furnishing Goods,
Potware, Kitchen and Stove Utensils.
r Send for Price List and Ciren
lars.
TO THE
PEOPLE OF CLARENDON CO
-0
C. MAYHEW & SON.
COLUMBIA AND ORANGEBURG.
w rarite aid lar bi
boro, South Carolina.
Country orders promptly attended
to, aud designs furnished on applica
tion.
Jan21
A WAIRM
WELCOME
AWAITS TOU AT
I --o
OPPOSIT E COURT IIOUSE,
MANNING, SOUTH CAROLINA.
Regardless of the high license lhe
sels the verv FINEST BRANDS of
LIQUORS, WINES and BEER
REMEMBER
The best LIQUORS for L oney
than anywhere else.
LIQUORS FOR MEDICINAL PUR
POSES A SPECIALT Y.
Agent for the leading Cigars of the
State. The John McCullough and the
Eagle Urand; also the largest and finest
stock of other Ciears and Tobacco in
town.
RILLIARIDS ANDI POOL.
Ont irst-class tables, with separate
room for colored pecople.
HOT FA OT DRINKS.
Ilie begs to tender his thanks to his
friends tind patrotns and asks a con tinu
ance oi the same:~
Comec one'. Come all!
y* Ieember that Polite CeM.
serve you and every attention sh-nyn.

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