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The Manning times. (Manning, Clarendon County, S.C.) 1884-current, December 27, 1922, Section One Pages 1 to 4, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063760/1922-12-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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e ection One
Age it 4 .ragstet
V'. XI I MANNING, S. C., WED1TESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1922
DR M O LAYS
GOVNOR PARKER
Foimer Mayor pf Mer Rouge Arrest
ted in Baltimore
CHARGED WITH MURDER
Louisiana Executive Is Defender of
Bootleggers, Is Claim
Joaltimore, Dec. 26.-Dr. B. M. Mc
XKoin, fo rmer mayor of 14er Rouge,
La. who is- wanted' there in con
nection with the Morehouse Parish
kidnappings and the finding of two
mutilated -bodies in Lake La -Fourche,
was arrested here today at the Johns
Hopkins University-Brady Institute
-where he is taking a post-graduate
course. The arrest followed receipt
of a telegram from Governor John M.
Parker of Louisiana requesting the
local police to arrest McKoin on a
charge of murder.
After questioning by police of
ficihls Dr. McKoin was locked up to
await further action by Louisiana
authorities.
Other than requesting thb local
authorities to arrest McKoin there
was nothing contained in Governor
Parker's telegram. It read:
"Important. Arrest Dr. McKoin
for murder. Hold him for Louisiana
authorities."
Dr. McKoin denied knowledge of
the, killing of the two men. "All
I know," he declared, "is that both
me nkillcd were on the bad side
the side of bootleggers, gunmen and
men who associated with negro we
', men."
Purely by Surprise
The discovery of Dr. McKoin here
and his subsequent arrest came
about purely by accident. Word
was received here several day: ago
thaTibr. McKoin was a .student at
Johns Hopkins and D9partment of.
- Justice agents sought to question
him. However, university officials
denied McKoin was registered as a
post-graduate, and. stated several
o letters had been received ther, but
unable to locate him, the letters
were turned over to the postoflice
department as "unknown."
.Early today a policeman was found
on the water front unconscious. He
was removed to a hospital. When the
hospital report reached police head
quarters it was signed by Dr. Mc
'Koin. It was then that local news
papersmen rushed to the hospital and
interviewed him. Up to that time the
telegram from Governor Parker ask
ing for his arrest had not been receiv
ed. Dr. McKoin spoke freely and in
sisted he was not a fugitive from jus
tice, and that he had made no at
tempt to conceal his identity.
He stated he has been in B3lti
more since October 1, and had left
Mer Rouge after an attempt had
been made to assassinate him.
Not Member of Klan
Dr. McKoin insisted he was not
a.member of the Ku Klux Klan: He
praised the organizati., however,
saving the members "did much to
hold down bootlegging and im
morality, while I was mayor of Mer
Rouge.' He also stated that law
lessness is a common occurrence
at. Mer Rouge and that he was
among those who started to clean
up the place. The result he said,
. was a hard battle with bootleg
gers, moonshiners and men of bad
repute.
'Just before I left Mer Rouge a
boy of a good family was shot in
the back. What did the sheriff and
Governor do? The case was dis
missed after a jury filled with boot
leggers and the vicious element de
clared the alleged murdlerer inno
ic ent.
"Now, howvever, when a bootleg
gait andl some one else is killed, the
Governor joins in the investigation
This affair, in rmy opinion, wili do
cide whether the dlecent andl good
element of the town will control."
Dr. McKoin statedl he had re
ceived threatening letters a long
time before lie left Mer Rouge and
aisked the sheriff to investigate
without success. "Just as I left
the miayorship and the successful
candidate went into office," he con
tinuedl, "gAngs that paraded the
streets fired shots around my house.
I asked the sheriff to take mat
ters in handl, but nothing was done."
HEARD ON ISLAND OF MAUN
Honolulu, Dee. 26.-Musical so
lections, broadcast by station WSB,
of Atlanta, Ga., December 15 and
16, were heard distinctly at Wai
luku, Island of Maun, according to
advices just receivedl Iere. A. F.
Iosta, postmaster at Wailuku, op
erated the amateur set that picked
up the signals.
SEVERAL4 PERSONS SHOT
Darlington, Dec. 26.-One negro
man was shot to dleath, another negro
had his finger chopped oft by an axe,
a small negor girl was accidentally
shot, when a shot gun foll from a
wagon and another negor man was ac
cidentally shot in the log by one-of
his friends during the holid aya just
passedl. ___
AUTOMOBILE IS BLAMED
Chicago, Dec. 26.-TIhe automobIle
caused a higher number of sudden and
violent deaths i Chicago and Cook
* county during the past year tha~n any
otiragency, aeording to a report of
osw 'sr office pubnnlh~ksmto
WILL W TRY fOR
*ONEOF IE$E ^ FARMS?.
Gable, S. C., Dec. 6th, 1922.
Mr. Harvie Jordan, Seety.
Cotton Growers Associaaon,
'St. Mnatthews, S. C
Dear Sir:
I noticed a report of' your speech
in Charlotte N. C. about two weeks
ago, in which you said: "It la only a
question of time- when the boll weevil
will eventually destroy the cottpn
crop, unless systematic, concerted ac
tion is taken by the farmers to pre
vent it, even- Pt they have to be forced
into it by law."
I also noticed an article in last
Sunday's'State, from which it appears
that the Agriculture Department in
Bulletin No. 1111 advisep community
organization in gin units.
In today's paper a repo't of the
Memphis meeting in which Mr. Hun
ter said: "An individual farmer who
does not follow proper Wethods may
breed enough weevils to nullify the
efforts of his neighbors. It therefore
appears that some system of enforc
ing community action{ by law is de
sirable."
I thought about a year ago that I
saw the same thing Mr. Hunter says,
as quoted above, an$ ran a page ad
vertisement in the Manning Times,
calling for a meeting of the farmers
in our community May 13th. We are
enclosing circular distributed at that
time, also copy of a! report of the
meeting.
As we were rather; late in getting'
started iast year, we did not accom
plish as much as we hoped to.
If after reading thlt ;circular you
are enough interestedito attend a re
vival meeting of this organization and
will advise about when it would suit
you to come, we will arrange for a
meeting. The farmers at Summerton
were called together last week for
the purpose of forming a similar or
ganization, and those present at the
first meeting appointed a committee
to arrange for the second meeting, at
which time the Association will prob
ably be formed.
I have talked with quite. a number
of farmers in the neighborhood of
Bishopville, and they are Teady for
a similar organization. One of the
Lee County farmers remarked to me
a few days ago, that he did not dread
the wintered over weevil any more,
he could take care of hitn, but the mi
gratory weevil is what he dreads.
An organization of this kind would
go a long ways toward solving the
problem of community planting one
kind of seed, planting at a given time,
all picking at the same time, and all
destroying the stalks at the same
time.
Will you help us?
Very truly yours,
C. C. Christal.
Mr. C. C. Christal,
Gable, S. C.
Dear Mr. Christal:
After an absence in New York and
New England covering a' period of
some two weeks, I find upon my re
turn your valued communication of
the 6th instant, which I have read
with :auch interest.
It will afford me great pleasure to
comply with your very cordial invita
tion to meet with a gathering of your
farmers at sometime during the
months of January and February, and
discuss with them the latest and most
approved methods of boll weevil con
trol.
The American Association is pre
paring to inaugurate a system of
county demonstration farms in 400
counties east of the Mississippi river
next year. It will be a great aid to
the far'mers of your county to have
such, a (demonstration farm in your
county, to be planted, cultivated,'fer
tilizedl and poisoned undler specific
directions for getting the best possible
results.
If you will write to me about the
first of .January, stating what time
during that month or February you
would prefer to have your county
meeting in regard, to these matters,
I will make my arrangements to com
ply with your invitation and be with.1
you on that occasion. It is our pur
pose to do everything possible (luring
the coming season to render every
valuable aidl to the farmers in the
South Atlantic and Middle Gulf States
to enable them to overcome the wvee
vil andl prevent the migratory flight
of the insect which dlestroys the crop
each season nt -heavily infested sec
tions.
With best wIshes for a Merry
Christmas and Happy Now Year, I
am,
Veytruly yours
(siged) arvie. Jordan,
Secretary,
American Cotton Association.
Gable, S. C., Dec. 23, 1922.
Mr. Shope,
Dear Sir:
I am enclosing copy of letter just
received.
It appears probable that wve can
get one of these 400 Demonstration
farms for Clarendoni County, if we
try.
Will you-assist in forming a County
organization for the purose of com
bhating the weevil and trlgto briny
Clarendon back to pro-bol weevil
conditions-48,000 bales ?
Would you like to have Mr. Hlarvie
JordIan, Secretary of the American
Cotton Association with us at the or..
ganization meeting?
Where should the meeting be hold
and when? I favor meeting at the
COuiti Home. Satunda-y. ?4lnna int
fy!-V ~ 44 HAD qj,%
EAp 44 149
eN0U684 OP
AP AR
fI
or~~~ 20th an oudbepeae t ea DS
yo. as Suda
C . C . C h i s a l - d is c o v e r ed t h e
receied fom M. C.. Crs a of i as n ft
Gabe. r.Chrsta i trvlnrlngta ann
STILL WAITING
I,/e. S,&wAR!
orthih i and e lieed t isc yars At neS
yoh . dut oEsst Snday
Vemr lrno Ci~! outy to e iTe an
Co.Crstlo icoee h
busy0th, and fo d soe c ee toreaMr T houS
aTon ab ove the gttes ave eeverpoured ii
recive frmM.CL.Chitlo t~ast ondofy
Gable. Mr. Christalts trateaimeeaing bythanrid w
orm20t in Cformunat Comeulnty to bd ing TheMr
aToe atbone tore figtte boll weeil woule falle vin
rcie rM.C. Christal suget tha aa meein by hadior
get one of the 400' experimental farms seventy horses
that Mr. Jordan says is goig to be cows and a bi
placedi the cotton belt of the South. several car lo<
. It is time for Clarendon County to gies,' automobi
get together and try to. get on our and ton upon
feet. We can do it if we will only etc.
make the efort. There is no one go- rhe squeals
ing to jump in and help us unless we the bellows of
show the proper spirit and start the and groanse
work ourselves. heart-renderin
We beheve it is the duty of some to save them.
of ouri leading men to take hold of horse who ws
this movement at once and get out town bought i
and interview the people and see just who for years
what date they want the meeting the duties as a
held. Mr. Christal will gladly fur- to (loath. In
nish all the help that he can. Let's horses were]
hear from seome one tomorrow, haven't as yet
from Mr. Tho
horses and mu
WORKING ON HIGHWAYS is supposed th
flce, besides th
Columbia, Dee. 26.-Highways The Mannir
throughout South Carolina are rapid- There was $
ly being put in shape for fir'st-class contents. IMr.
travel following cessation of the gen- all of his thin
eral rains last Fridlay, it wvas anno un- ing. Thomas'
cedl at the office of the State Hi-gh- $35, 000 net.
way Commission here today. Mainten
ance gangs andl patrolmen are busy
and it is expected that every mile of - UE~L IB
State roadl under maintenance will
have been gone over by Wednesday. Washington
The commission gave out this Senprae
statement, headed "Highways Now ("yas federa
in Better Condition." transmissiont
"The State Highway Department Harding to b
announced this mornig that since uary 1. Aloi
the cessation of rains Friday the brief report oi
State highways are being' rapidly .emergency oft
whipped back into shape. The main- lislied Septeml
tenance gangs and patrolmen ever clusion of tl
the State arti now busy and it is Spens will reti
eg pectedl that practically overy as vice presi
mil10 of ,State road under maitite- .Burlington ani
nance will liave been mnachined gr headquarters
dragged by tomorrow. It is consid<
"Through trafile should experi-- fuel distrihut
enco no especial difficulty en the closed soon
State roads after todlay except tbhat though an o
ron the Washingtoni-Atlanta high- held $agether
way through Chesterfield County; details. Uhd
'traffic should detour by Hartsville -Presdnt Wa
lan' Bsh~vile. Throuh traflW its aclo te
betweet Greitvill Grioiwbyd drawing a,-pi
Nvilh find' better roads boin via an emergney'~
Piedmont. Belton and on Id. -f-nntioned
view of I92L 1
eop
"s.e Qye An "u
~~ 536 w~ AND SHO'iW
ckURTS "SLUMP
-A'4} PR<me5IV6. ..
tr~rrSD o o*
CLEM3BJCILAU VISITS US:
6O'S4 AND I a" r
,UST PAID
U750000,000
-W
!" " QF WE~H WANTS HI oTml
~S. STILL owei/-0 WHAT
YOU',~REA
'r7 E'T/
Nov COME
-rKS Sova
CASro MAWIt
0 #
COP . 0oe1T IAN
TRICE .r..s
iEFvstp To
SLIC 007 SQuee Y Ep-. - AKE Ms-ICN
STROUS FIRE SUMTER TO SPEND
SEVERAL. MILLION
night at 10:20 o'clock
was sent in as it was
large brick stables of On Public Improvement - Roads,
Stock Co., burning .
four streams of water Bridges, Fire Department and
to the mass of flames. Electric Plant Receive
he most disastrous fires Benefit
has experienced in--.-.
time looked as if the Su.mter, Dec. 26.-Sumter county
, the Bank of Mann- and the city of Sumter are now in
min Times, Postoffice, the course of spending $4,678,500 ir
Nimmer's residence modern county and municipal imjprove.
;ims to the fire, but ments, according to a compilatior
;he damage was confin- maedlpublic here today by E. 1. Rear
mas building. In the don, manager-secretary of the Sum.
about sixty-five to ter County Chamber of Cop mnerce
and mules, several The improvements range from 125
Inch of hogs. Besides miles of concrete and asphalt high.
is of new wagons, bug- jways and a modern municipal electri<
les, farm machinery light and ice plant to the construction
ton of hay, corn, peas, of an abattoir for preparing meat foi
the citizens of the city and county.
from the burning hogs, Besides the public moneys being
the cowvs and the moans spent many thousands of dlollarl
>f (lying horses were are being spent on private enter
7, but it was impossible prises. Modern rural school build
Major the big black ings arc being constructed in, mana
.a the first horse the sections of the county.
or the fire wagon, and The money now in -course is be
~and years performed ing' spent includes a bond issue foi
fire horse, was burned $2,500,000 authorized by dlirect vot<
fact,, both of the town of the people for roads and one
ost in the fire. We for $500,000 voted by the countl
been able to ascertain legislative dlelegation. It is esti
mao how many of his mated that to this $3,000,0000 fun<
les wecre bur;.ed, but It will be added $600,000 from Stat,
are were about twenty- ,and federal funds. Besides thi:
s cows and hogs. .sum, the count ypaid $37,600, as it:
g .Drug Store, which one-fourth of the cort of builing
aildmng was destroyed, the Wateree bridge; $11,000 for ap
,000 insuranco on the proaches to the bridge and $15,00(
Thomas had $4,000 on for machinery and equipment fo:
gs including te build- building the Owgo highway.,
loss is somethIng like The city of Sumter has jusf spen
$700,000 for the purchase of thl
-old privately owned electri. ligh
[188 WILL QUIT and ice plant and the buIlding :
a muodern plant; a bond issue o:
$260,000 was voted on Septemboi
Dec. 26.-Conrad E. 12, for street and sidewalk work
1i his resignation to- $26,000 has been dlonatedi by fifta'
I fuel distributor for citizens for establishing the Me
omorrow to President morial Park to World War Vet
ecome effective Jan- erans; $2,000 for moderiizing an<
ig with It will go a miotorizin~ the lire department
*the work of the $16,000 or dlowtnown street light
ce, which was estab- ing $756,000 for extension and en
er 22, after the con- largig of the watqr mains, estab
ie coal strikes. Mr. lishment of a gerba go removal sys
urn to his former post temn, a public n~ural gservice am
ent of the Chicago, motorizin gof the vai ous services
LQuiney iulroad, with and $8 0 0fo erection of a mod
~tChicago~ ern abattoir.
red probable that the The county, according to Mr. Rear
Ion offices will be don, has adopted the slogan "nevel
after January , al- say die--to--with the bol weevily
rganization wi be an~ is planning its work so it will bi
to care for leftover independent of cotton in the fytt~wo.
es the raw creatngit,'
rding~ may term late M~yfoolish persons add to tha
at ny time by with- ;buren of tomorrow before they ar<
'olumation declaring 'called upon to bear it. We can al
under which! it has Increse our worrIes; It Is as simpJ
aiif surely better, to lessen them
SHIPS BAlIERED
BY FIERCE STONS'
Fr4ourteen Vessels- Enter lty York
Badly Scarredc
FiVE VESSELS OVIgRDUE
Skippers Report Viciod Never-End
ing Battles With .ashing
hurricanes
New York, Dec. 26.Battered and
scarred by heavy weather, fourteen
ships plowed slowly into quaran
tine from early morning until late
afternoon today, the,' skippers of
them all reportin r a vicious never
ending battle wit i. a series of lash
ing hurricanes Which seemed to
shake the Atlantic to the bottom.
One ship- the 'igantic new liner
Caronia-put in at ,Halifax because
she was steadily losing her fight
with the storm. Another liner re
ported to her owners that she would
be two days late, A third flashed in
with a. report tIfat she couldn't reach
New York until tomorrow, although.
she has apparently gone safely
through most 4f the storm.
The center o 'the storms which have
been ruling the waves for the last
three weeks, aplleared to be about
1,000 niles off f 4e European coast.
Skippers of the linas said they crash
ed int othem at this port and fought
steadily through terrific gales until
within 500 miles of the United States.
All Are 'attered
All of the ships which came into
quarantine today were freighters.
Some of the mhadt parts of the
bridges gone. Small boats on their
decks were crushed a d torn. In
one or two instances4 Ratches were
pounded in, and all of them reported
their crews had been I oil skins
almost steadily for from five to
-fourteen days.
Even with fourteen ships, report
ing in, quarantine did not have as
many as were expected. Five ships,
including La Savoie, were overdue.
La Savoie reported she would be
in Thursday but - the owners' heard
nothing from the Lord Byi h, the
Eastern City and the York Castle,
all of which were expected at their
docks today. The President Mon
roe will arrive tomorrow. Cable
and wireless messages told of the
ravages on the European side. Fal
mouth, England, reported three
ships had put in there with broken
machinery and another went to St.
Vincent, Cape Verde Islands, her
engines also damaged.
The Belgian steamship Londoner,
going to Norfolk, Va., had to stop
in Queenstown for repairs. Ilali
fax reported that the Norwegian
freighter Lorentz W. Hanson, which
sailed from Swansea, Wales, De
cember 14, with a load of coal, had
been forced to put back to Liverpool,
leaking and with her bridge swept
away,
POISON LIQUOR CAUSES DEATHS
New York, Dec. 26.-Eight death
wer attributed today to drinkill'g
poisonous liquor over Christmas. A
score or more of victims were con
fined to hospitals.
Of the eight persons who died,
two were women. A Brooklyn wo
man was arrested as the seller of
whiskey which caused the death of
one of the women.
Many in Hospital
Boston, Dec. 2(-t-More than fif
ty persons were in hospitals here
today suffering from alcohol poi
son as a result of drinking liquors
obtained during the holidays. Two
dleaths due to this cause occurred.
Eighteen of the patients were list
ed as in a critical condition.
One Death
D~etroit, Dec. 26.-Poi sonous liquor
-(obtainedl over the Christmaus holidays
- was declared by the p)olice today to
have been responsible for one dheath
andl the illness of more than a score
of persons here. From Saturday
night until this morning, twventy-three
personsi declared to'have partaken of
poisonous whiskey were admitted to.
hospitals.
<WILL D)ISCUSS TRAFFIC
Washington, Dec. 26.-A confer
ence of representatives of steam
ship lines in the Gulf, South At
lantic and North Atlantic districts
will be held January 15 to diaduss
trafic matters with a view of re
vising any dliscrepancies, andl con
'tin~uinig their harmonious relations,
'toe Shipping Board ann.ouncel to
day.
Representatives of foreign flag
lines as wol Ias of American opera
tors- have been inv'itedl to attend the
I conference, which, it wvas said prob
ably will be held at Atlantic dity.
MISS WILLIAMS TO IFESIGN
Memphis, Dec. 26.--Miss Chart
I Wi li ms, of Memphis, on January
1 ~l1 resign as vice chairman of
the Democratic national committee
and as the woman representative
from Tennesseo on that committee,
sh~e announcedl tonight.
Miss Williams has been a mom
bqr of the committee since 1018 and
,yice chairman since 1020. She said
slie had found it impossible to give
the necessary work to political af
.fairs, and she had, theroforo de
I 'eided to notify Cordell Hull, ciair
i s of the committee, ofher desire
fta maion.

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