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The Tulsa star. (Tulsa, Okla.) 1913-1921, October 16, 1920, Weekly Mail Edition, Image 1

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MA
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A. Fcarlcs Exponent of. Right
And justice.
An Uncompromising Defender
of the Colored . Race.
We fear only to do wrong.
Larger Circulation than all the
combined Colore a Weeklies lu
Oklahoma.
Read THE STAR and keep in
formed on all current issues.
Weefcly Mail Edition
VOLUME X
THE Tl'LSA STAR, Saturday, October 10, 1920.
NrMBIDIt TWKNTV NINE
RIO
TAVE
BY
MEN
MANY LOSE HOMES
IN ARKANSAS EIRE
EIGHT BLOCKS IN PINE BLUFF
NEGRO SECTION SWEPT
BY SWIFT FLAMES
VICTIMS WALK STREETS
WHICH MEANS MORE TO YOU?
Pine Bluff, Ark., Oct 12. Nearly 500
people arc homeless tonight, some sit
ting woefully on guard over a trunk,
a bureau or whatever comprises the
little household furniture that was
saved from their homes, others are
wandering aimlessly around in the de
vastated district trying to find a place
to sleep. Still others have no clothes
but those they wear all are victims
of a sweeping conflagration that in
two hours this afternoon swept over
eight blocks of a colored residential
district destroying 54 homes, only two
of which were occupied uy wnitcs.
Only the dying out of a brisk
southeast wind and cntranchment tac
tics of fire fighting checked the fire
and prevented it from spreading into
the Cotton Belt shop district.
So thickly situated were dwellings
in the colored section that an accu
rate check of the nuirbtr if houses
destroyed was not completed until late
tonight and estimates of the c'.tirc
loss based on the destruction of 54
homes were placed at between $200,000
and $300,000.
r Not a single fatality had been re
ported up to late tonight and a can
vass of hospitals indicated that only
a few received slight injuries, most of
these suffering burns when they rush
ed into their homes in efforts to save
household effects.
An aged woman -was forcibly taken
from her home after she had rushed
back into the dwelling declaring fran
tically that she was "goin' with her
home." She pleaded with her rescuers
to be allowed to perish in her burning
home. Throughout the district arc the
charred bodies of oics. horses, cows.
and house pets. One man rushed into
a burning bar nana dragged out a pig
that weighed about 200 pounds by its
hind feet. A crowd soon gathered,
summoned by the pig's squeals, and
the animal was carried from the burn
ing district with the utmost care.
A mass meeting has been called to
raise funds tb relieve suffering.
Insurance men and officials were
making a check of the district tonight.
Guards had been posted in the district
and firemen were prepared to copo
with a high wind should it raise and
glow the embers from smouldering
ruin's.
Blaze Still Proceeding No Estimate
of Loss Is Given Out
Pine Bluff, Ark., Oct. 12. More
than 10 houses, most of them occu
pied by negroes, were destroyed or
still are burninc at 3:15 this afternoon
. in a fire which started at 2:00 p. in.
in the negro section of the city. The
flames at this hour had spread into
the white residence section. Firemen
believed the were gradually getting
the fire under control.
Three stores, a church, and a num
ber of small business houses were in
the path of the flames. Nearly 500
people had been made homeless and a
fund for their relief was started be
fore the flames were under control.
No estimate of the loss is available.
So far as could be learned at 4
p. m., there had been no casualties
in the blaze. Several sick persons
and one man with a broken lcg were
carried from houses out of the imme
diate path of the flames.
The fire was declared to be under
control shortly after 4 p. m. and a
request for equipment trom Little
Rock was countermanded. The wind
seemed to be dying down this time
and firemen expressed confidence in
their ability to check the flames. Only
a few scattered houses in an area of
more than eight blocks were left
standing.
Bill E.VC- THE ftfTGftOfS
or TH.e United Dtate-s
should be Guaranteed
Thfir Rights
Ps HAW J- THC SAm OLD
ROT. rrE OONSTirirjON
our? ri&mts. WW wr wAvr
' rNFORcrwrt
9
THFIR Rl6MTS -V JPslp
HARDIN6 SjL
Cohst.tui.on rem Y31
Letter if Elected jHfflf
IN OKMULGEE
HILL WILL NOT GO
BACK TO ARKANSAS
Federal Charges Arc Dropped Man
Wanted in Helena Race
Riot Case
Leavenworth, Kan., Oct 15. Pro
ceedings begun in the Kansas federal
court to bring about the return to Ar
kansas of Robert Hill, accused of
participation in race disturbances at
Helena last nil, have been dismissed
at the instance of Attorney General
Palmer, according to announcement
made by I' red Robertson, U S dis
trict attorney for Kansas, here late
today.
According to statements of federal
officiali, Hill's status is now that of
a free man. No further proceedings
arc pending against him and they said
he is free to return to Arkansas.
Howc-cr, friends of Hill saifl late to
day that he had obtained employment
on a farm near here and that he would
make no effort to return to Arkansas.
MOB STORMS JAIL TO FIND
PRISONER GONE
Colored Men Armed for Sclf-Defehse
Waited for Attack That Did
Not Come
MASS MEETING HELD SUNDAY
AFTERNOON
Friendly Feeling Between Races Ex
ists After Much Excitement
TULSA JOCKEY FAVORITE AT
MUSKOGEE FAIR
Muskogee, Okla., Oct. 12. The fair
which closed here last week was a
record breaker from the point of at
tendance.. Thousands of visitors,
many of them colored people, at-
tinned the lair anil enjoyed the ex
hibits and the many amusements.
1 He races were probably the most
popular attractions and it may be said
with a degree of certainty that the
most popular jockey to appear on the
track was E. "Jockey" Mathews of
Tulsa, who appeared in five races,
winning two first prUes and two sec
ond prizes. This same jockey won
three out of five races in the Wagoner
County Fair week before last, making
seven he won out of ten mounts. The
colored people who attended the fair
and many whites cheered wildly when
Matncws won.
PILGRIMS TO SPEAK EN CONVENTION
HALL, SUNDAY EVENING, OCTOBER
17
International Bible Student Will Lec
ture to Tulsa People on
Divine Plan
ODD FELLOWS GET NEW
LODGE AT BRISTOW
TIES WIFE TO A CHAIR, STABS
HER WITH KNIFE
When policemen arrived at the
home of Finas and Josephnie Parker,
1712 South Madison, Sunday night in
answer to an urgent telephone call,
they found Mrs. Finas tied to a chatr
and bleedin gprofusely from two knife
wounds in her breast, inflicted by her
husband. The woman" will recover.
Neighbors told the police the affair
was the result of a long series of
quarrels. Finas has not been captured.
Dr. J. A. Cope, famous International
Bible student lecturer of New York
City, who has been in the city the past
two or three days, will lecture in the
Convention Hall tomorrow (Sunday)
afternoon. His subject will deal with
the true relationship of mankind to his
Creator and God's great plan of salva
universal unrest and point out where
we now stand in the great plan of the
ages.
Mr Cope is considered one of the
best public speakers in the country
and his lecture will be well attended.
Everybody is welcome and there will
be no admission fee.
Henry Pack on Police Force Again
The squauDle over tne appointment
of a colored policeman among the
leaders of Republican forces in our
group, came to an end (let us hope)
last Friday when the city commission
ers confirmed the appointment of H
C. Pack, well known citizen of Tulsa,
as city patrolman.
Mr. Pack served the city in this
capacity under the Democratic admin
istration and made a splendid record
as an officer. His appointment meets
with general approval am6ng the bet
ter element pf citizens who feel that
the best selection has been made by
the police department.
Col. Jefferson Put Twenty-nine on
the Goat Monday Night.
asked. Join today. Executive Sec
retary G. A. Gregg is on the job every
day in the week at "Y" rooms, 122'A
N. Greenwood street. Membership fee
$1 per year for salaried men, $5 per
year for business men.
S. D. HOOKER,
Chairman Board of Managers.
RACE NOTES FROM SAPULPA
fSnccial to The Tulsa Star) !
Bristow, Okla., Oct. 14. A new Odd
Fellows Lodge was set up here Mon
day night with a membership of twenty-nine,
all hearty Odd Fellows,, by the
decree of Grand Master E. D. Jeffer
son, who was himself present a'nd
helped in the initiation. This is the
second Odd Fcliowa lodge in Brijtow.
Arkansas Pastor Visits Tulsa
Rev. E. M. White, pastor of the
C M E. Churches at Louisville, Cau
field and Bradley, Ark., is in the city
on Church business. Rev. White has
a w'lle reputation as a church builder,
having built a creditable edifice at
Bradley, Ark, with eight members,
and one at Louisville before he had
any member. He is in Tulsa to raise
money to help in building a church
in Caufield.
(Special to Tulsa Star)
Okmulgee, Okla., Oct. 12. All is
quiet again in this city after the ex
citement of last Saturday night when
an attempt was maue to lynch Joe
Atchison, charged with, the attempted
assault upon Miss Helen Armour, a
young white, woman of this city.
Atchison had been arrested Satur
day morning as a suspect in connec
tion with the crime and placed in jail.
Feeling was high,- having been fanned
into ilame by repeated attempts made
on women here during the past two
weeks. At least half a dozen women
have been assaulted, one of them be
ing a colored woman, who was knock
ed down by her assailant, who es
caped when she screamed for help.
About a week ago an attempt was
qiade on a woman here and upon vis
iting the scene the chief of police
found a quantity of burnt cork, giv
ing rise to the opinion that the cul
prit was awnitc man. it was a spirit
of public indignation growing out of
these repeated attempts that burst
forth Saturday night when a mob
stormed t'e jail in search of Atchison,
who had been removed by Sheriff
Tucker earlier in the day to the Mus
kogee County ajil.
Late Saturday night it was rumored
that the mob planned to march on
the colored business section of the
city and forthwith a defense movement
was organized. In a short while
enough men were mobilized to stop a
small army" and word v.as sent to the
mob that it would be dangerous to go
near the colored section. This seems
to have had a soothing effect on the
temper of the mob, which soon dis
persedsomething Sheriff Tucker and
Rev. F. F. Walters (white) had not
been able to do.
This attempt to lynch a colored
man in Okmulgee has served to inti
mate what will actually happen here
if mob violence is allowed to prevail.
While the better clement of the Race
here are a unit against crime of any
kind committed by individuals of our
group, or any other group, they also
are lirm in their determination to
protect themselves against mobs. This
was clearly demonstrated Saturday
night.
(Continued on Page Eight)
Hunton Branch T
. Membership Drive
The membership drive of the Hun
ton Branch Y. M C A., is a great
success Seventy-three members were
reported at last Tuesday's board meet
ing, ana more nave come in since.
The number will reach 100 new mem
bers by the end ofUhis week, making
a total membership of about 200 men.
The committee feels confident that
500 members will be obtained before
the campaign is over The broad prin
ciples upon which the Y. M. C. .A is
) founded warrant the support of our
By D. W. Filmore
Sapulpa, Okla., Oct. 12.
Editor Tulsa Star:
The Star is a popular paper in Sa
pulpa and we have had no trouble get
ting renewals from old subscribers and
adding a number of new ones to the
libt.
. The first place that I visited was
that of Mrs. Win. James, who con
ducts a first class cafe and rooming
house in this city. She readily gav
her check fnr the renewal of sub
scription and said "I look for the Star
each week like I look for letters from
home; simply can't do without it."
Mrs. JaniLS and her daughter leu to
day for Oklahoma City.
My next stop was at the Handcock
Boldcn barber shop, of which J. H.
Slaughter is manager. Mr. Slaughter
is also an admirer of the Star. In con
nection with his barber shop he also
conducts a cleaning and pressing busi
ness.' Stopping at the Davis Grocery and
Lunch Room, 217 West avenue, we
found Mr. Robert Davis, who is con
ducting a thriving business. When
told that I was representing the Tulsa
Star he said, "Well, that's the paper I
look for PYut me down as a sub
scriber," and he readily paid the price.
My next stop was at the office of
our old friends and both great ad
mirers of the Star, Drs. W. B. Hum
phrey and J. A. Owens. These phy
sicians are both enjoying a big prac
tice and arc making marked success in
this field.
I 1Q UC CUIIUIIUCUJ
THE SCOTTISH RITE DEGREES
. CONFERRED ON LARGE CLASS
Two Past Commanders of Kansas City Consistory
Conduct Administration
Mr. J. I). Brown, Past Comman
der in Chief of Kansas Consistory
No. 7, Kansas City, Mo., and at pres
ent Potentate of Allah Temple No. 0
in company with Mr. G. W. John
loon, another Past Commander of the
same consistory arrived in our city
last Wednesday morning with more
man iwo Hundred dollars worm oi
of paraphaunliu which was used in
conferring of the Scottish Hite De
grees of Ancient Free Masonry un
der the auspices of Middle West
Consistory No. 57 or tins City lliurs
diiy and Friday of this week.
The Degrees were conferred on a
class of iNLister Masons composed
mostly from the membership of
Coal Creek Ixwlge No. 88 and Sand
Springs Iodge No. 192, the largest
subordinate Bodies in the State.
Prof. J. W. Hughes, Principa of
Mc rilv'i rv!nri'il Schools and
iwell known among Masons by his
untiring efforts lor the- henent ot
the Institution is worshipful Mas
ter of Coal Creek Lodge No. 88,
and Mr. J. L. Easlqy, a worthy
oung man, is worwhipful Master
of Sand Springs Ixxlgc No. 102,
which is said to be the largest unci
most prosperous local Lodge in the
jurisdiction.
Mr. Amos S. Ncwkirk, one of our
most' successful business men Is
Commander in Chief of Middle
West CoivJistory No. 57 audi it is he
to whom Hie credit is due for such
creditable .showing made by Uie
Consistory at its recent communi
cation. The following named Masons arc
luvte who oinnoscd the class:
F. T. Smith, James Lewis, Ed.
Knox, Joe Austin, S. D. Hooker,
Wheeler Davis, Oscar McDonald,
I-ec Williams, Percy Moore. Henry
Nails, P. T. Stradrord, K. T. Waters,
Seymour. Johnson, E. E. Cotton, A.
I). Torrence, Sidney Flemmlnfts. A.
Continued on Page Eight.

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