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The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, January 11, 1907, Image 2

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IN-AQIl V iluXulU UiJUiiili,. H1UUAI,. JAiMUAllI Ai., li)Jt
J. .I0SSIE :E. "WELLS,
Diseases of ,Vj;mcn aiul Children.
Electrical Massage (Jiven at the
0 Sice..
OFFICE
RESIDENCE.
411 Fourth Avsiiue. N., 77 Maple Street.
'PhonJ477. 'Phone 13 1 8.
Offick Hours: iotoi2 a.m., evening
by appointment. 10-27-06 tf.
H. GLENN.
640 VETi.tQRE ST.,
Practical Cleaner and Dyer
OF
Ladies' and Gents' Clothing.
i2-7-o6tf
HO. 17. KELSO,
DEALER IN
IVood, Goal, Icq and
KINDLING.
ORDERS PROMPTLY DKLIVERED, GIVE J1EA CALL.
Yards Cor, Sixth Ave,, and Jefferson st.
13-7-06 tf
1 Place of Interest
Woman's Exchange
1508 HAMILTON ST.
Millinery, Dressmaking, Ready-to-wear
Garments, Notions, Ladies and Gents
Furnishings, Perfumes, Toilet Articles,
Holiday Goods, Material for Fancy Work
a Specialty, Cleaningriyeing, Pressing,
Remodeling, ...,,-
Glue Ua a Call.
HrT D. Cray " Mrs. Lottie Herrod.
Economical Steam Laundry,
OWED, OPERATED AXD
CONTROLLED BY NEGROES.
"We solicit your patronage. First-class
work at reasonable prices. Packages
called for and delivered to all part3 of
the city. Give us a trial.
ARTHUR (i. PRICE, Manager.
Telephone 40o. , 412 Cedar Street.
GO TO
Clias. Puryear,
Contractor and Builder,
When vou want Repair and Job Work
done, Screens a specialty. All work
guaranteed done satisfactorily. bhop:
210 Seventh Avenue, South.
5-15-06 4t
Geo. A. Gary,
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES,
COR. 7th AND SILVAN STS.
6-15-06 tf
Come to the:
Capitol Shoe Store
423 CEDAR STREET,
FOR SPECIAL BAHGA1H9 ON
Sho3S. Unbrsllas and Gloves.
PROPRIETORS.
C. S. nandals, - S. J. tfesbit.
12.14-00 4t-.
J. T. Upskw,
Physician, Surgeon and Professor
of Mental Science,
Washington St., Mt. Pleasant, Tenn.
Rail lhnn TJV-2 F.I pit..
nvriJ'A nill'DS. 9 ,n a m 1 itt til
MUTUAL BENEFIT rAS5.pCIATION
IIOTjDS THTTlTEENi?? 'fNNUAL
MEETING EANQUL ,JJ OFFI
CIALS AND PUBLIC.
The thirteenth annual meeting of
the Mutual Benefit Association was
held In the auditorium of the Sylvan
Street Baptist Church, Monday even
iug, January 7. InviUiiona had al
ready been sent out, in which the pub
lic was invited to attend. The meet
ing was called to order at 8:30 o'clock
by the president. S. H. Bosley. Prayer
was offered by the first vice president,
S. G. Dodson. At this point Rev. Wm.
Ilaynes, the pastor; was introduced
and in a very neat speech, welcomed
the Mutual Benefit Association on be
half of the church. The house was
crowded and at the conclusion of the
pastor's welcome address, he received
a hearty applause. Seated on the
platform were the officers of the As
sociation, together with the choir and
several visitors. The president de
livered his annual address, which was
timely and pointed. The vice presi
dent responded and Mr. R. II. Tabor,
the second vice president, made an ex
cellent address. He said that no com
pany in the city or county could offer
better Inducements for those who had
limited money to Invest, and that this
was proven by the thirteen years' ex
istence of this Association. The sec
retary, R. S. Harris, made but few
remarks. The banking committee,
sisting of W. T. Jordan, R. N. Bibb,
and R. S. Harrid, each made short
talks, as did the two trustees, Bedford
Hughes and J. T. Thompson. After
this, Mr. Henry A. Boyd, who was rep
resenting the Globe, was Invited to
the platform on behalf of the press.
He remarked that he admired the ef
forts being put forth by the Mutual
Benefit Association and had but one
criticism to offer, which could hardly
be called a criticism, because we were
all Teaming how to transact business
among ourselves. He said that the
funds of the Mutual Benefit Associa
tion, since it was a Negro institution,
composed of Negroes, by Negroes and
for Negroes, should be deposited in a
Negro bank, especially since the One
Cent Savings Bank had proven to be
one of the strongest banks in the
state. He declared that .the Nashville
Globe would advocate first, last and
always, Negro enterprises.
The aduience was patient through
out the exercises. After this program
came the admission cf members and
payment of dues, which took up only
a short time. The, report given by
the Association dhows that from 1902
1906 $1,315 had been paid in sick ben
fits, that $696.00 had been paid in
death benefits, that the total deposits
from 1902,1906 had amounted to $11,
478.27, while the total disbursements
were only $3,783.57. The amount paid
to members as dividend was $7,694.70.
At the close of these exercises all re
paired to the basement, where a sump
tuous banquet was served by the la
dies' auxiliary. An excellent menu
was prepared. The Association is In
a prosperous condition and has a large
membership both in East and West
Nashville.
MISS HESTER O. BROWN'S LAST
RECITAL.
Nashville has been treated to the
greatest musical recitals in the past
two weeks it has ever witnessed. This
was plainly evident on last Friday
evening when Miss Hester Octavla
Brown, a graduate of" the Oberlin Con
servatory of Music, Oberlin, Ohio, ap
peared for her . final recital in
Nashville at Meharry Auditorium.
True to the prediction made in the
Globe of previous dates, she captivated
her audience. Reputed and celebrated
musicians sat entranced from the be
witching strains of the melody she
poured forth from her violin. That
she is one of the foremost violin
players of to-day, notwithstanding her
short career before the public, cannot
be denied. The well-instructed musi
cal students of Walden. as well as the
teachers were in the audience and
gave vent to their satisfaction by con
tinuing a prolonged applause.
The program was arranged by Miss
Mamie Braden, musical instructor at
Walden. She was assisted by Prof.
Johnson, violin teacher, and Miss Jo
sephine Price. The program was one
that carried with it all the advanced
and late musical compositions. At
8 o'clock the spacious auditorium was
well filled when Mr. J. Blaine Boyd,
President of the Mt Olive B. Y.
P. U., under whose ausnices Miss
Brown appeared, led her down the
aisles and from thence to the nlat-
form. The recital was given for the
benefit of the Mercy Hospital and was
in every way a success. The Walden
orchestra opened the program with
selection. Misses Stewart and Porter
played a duet. "11 Trovatore." Miss
Brown played ''6th Air Varie". Ere
she had begun this beautiful seleclon
she was Interrupted by great applause
from the audience. This was repeated
for three times before the first selec
tion could be rendered. At the conclu
sion the audience clamored until she
responded the encore, in which she
played "Intermezzo" from Cavaleria
Rusticana. Thi3 was a great hit Miss
Maud J. Roberts fjXitl'WhlSDer and
T UT1 It,
tor Vi
Moored renent.
' ' 77 '-ion
for the second time. -Miss E. C. Mit
chel rendered an excellent piano, solo
and was called . back. Miss Brown
then played "Elegie" from - Bazzinl.
The Walden. orchestra played "Ray
mond Overture" from Thomas. Mr.
E. O. Miller sang a pleasing bass solo.
Miss Brown again captivated the aud
ience with "The , Voice of Chimes"
from Luigini. '
The Meharry Quartette rendered a
selection and the Walden Orchestra
played "Dream of Hearts Waltz." The
program was closed with a selection
from Mls3 Brown, who played "Scene
de Ballet'' from De Beriot Here, she
was so lustily applauded that she was
forced to return and render "Perpetuo
Mobile" by Carl Bohm.
Too much cannot be said In praise
for this recital, as It goes down in his
tory the greatest fete Nashville has
had for many years. Miss BroWn
proved that she was ahead of her class
as . a violin player. Her instructor,
Prof. F. G. Doolittle, who is a profess
or of violin at Oberlin, and who stud
ied In Berlin, Germany, has done cred
it to his profession In sending forth
such an apt pupil. Nashville has
heard Douglass in many re
citals; people - from Nashville have
heard Clarence Cameron White,
while visiting other cities; and the
music world knows of Mr. Weir, who
gained the reputation of "Lion of the
West," but all are of the opinion, that
Miss Brown has made good on the
stage as a violin player. Much is
known of the ability of Mr. Kubelite,
who is rated as the best violin player
in the United States, and that Miss
Brown, In a few years, will be in his
class, seems certain. Her stay In
Nashville was not only a musical
treat but society lent Its efforts in en
tertaining her. Her stay has been a
help to the ambitious students of this
city.
-
THE VIOLIN.
The human heart's a seasoned violin;
i?xur masters play the four respon
sive strings -
The G that groans, the D that softly
prays,
The A that laughs and treble E that
sings.
A somber span across the gulfs of
night,
Whereon the master of a hopeless
prayer
Has improvised a cheerless melody
ur echoes from, the valley of Des
pair. '
D '
The Master's soothing chord when Sor
row weeps,
And Hope, the Quiet Comforter, Is
rear .
A strand of sunlight shining in the
bow,
But on the string the beading of a
tear.
A
The mellow note of love, that, out of
tune,
Is harsher than raw Sorrow, or De
spair, But, under the master touches, clear
and true,
Is sweet as swallows, wooing sum
mer air.
E
The silver thread that glimmers in the
weave
Of every masterpiece. A whistling
boy
First strung It on the wondrous vio
lin
And plays it now the silver string
of joy.
G D A E -
But when the masters play, the four as
one,
Despair and Love, and Joy and Sor
row s part,
O then and not till then shall mor
tal hear
The strangest, sweetest music of
the heart!
Aloysius Coll In Alnslee's Magazine,
MEHARRYITES ENTERTAINED.
One of the finest parties of the sea-
son was that given by Mrs. Alice
Webster at the home of Mr. Frank
Ewing, 1215 Grundy street, during
the holidays, in honor of Messrs. J.
E. Ward and O..N. Wilson, of Mehar
ry Medical College. A six-course
menu was served in which the colors,
red and black, the college colors, were
carried out. The house was decor
ated in a profusion of flowers, palms,
ferns and holly. The hostess, who
was prettily attired in a dress of lace
and jet over red silk, was assisted
in receiving by Miss Jessie E. Smith
Mr. Wm. Gregory was toastmaster. A
number of guests were present and
thoroughly enjoyed the hospitality of
the hostess.
-
SERIOUS ACCIDENT.
Mrs. Annie Tillman, who resides on
Gay street, was struck by a Jo John
stou avenue car between 6:30 and 7
o'clock Tuesday morning njnd waja
seriously injured. Mrs. Tillman is a
midwife and had been at work during
the night. She was on her way home
when the accident occurred. The un
fortunate woman was brushed aside
by the car and remained ur-conscious
for some tlmo. A carriage was called
and she was carriei) Mercy Hospit
al, on &.. ;L jt" '"11
was. found, Tnite Mrs. Tillman had a
fractured skull and a fracture of her
left leg. A Globe reporter was in
formed by .some parties who were
near the Fcene that the motorman
was running at a rapid rate of speed
and could not- "slow down" in t'.me
to prevent; the accident; others say it
was a piece-:of criminal carelessness,
and could have been avoided.
The authorities at Mercy Hospital
stated Wednesday that the condition
of Mrs. Tillman was serious, though
the indications are that " the lady
would recover unless unexpected com
plications put in an appearance.
A FURIOUS WOMAN.
On Monday, Jan. 7, about 12 o'clock,
a furious woman, almost insanely
mad, created a great excitement on
Capitol avenue between Fourth and
Fifth, by her savage attack on a
young fellow having but one leg.
She was prevented from doing him
any real, serious harm by ' another
man who seemed to - have . been his
friend, and who prevented her from
throwing the rocks she had In her
hands. This made her so furious that
she began to scream, which attracted
every passerby and every one In the
neighborhood, and soon Capitol ave
nue from Fourth to Fifth avenue, was
thronged with hundreds of people,
men, women and children, colored and
white, all curious to see what the mat
ter was and the outcome of the fray.
By and by a policeman hove in
sight around the corner off Fourth
avenue on a run; but before he could
reach the scene, the now thoroughly
enraged woman had fought herself
free and with two half brick, one in
each hand, was rushing up Capitol
alley toward Cedar street after the
man who was the object of her ire
and at whom she hurled the stones
with maddened savagery.
Seeing the policeman reaching for
her, she dodged' him and picking up
another stone threw it with terrible
force pointblank at the man's head
whom she had cornered, owing to the
fact that he, having but one leg, could
not get out of her way.
By. this time the officer had gotten
his hand on her and she turned on
him, knocking his kit f-tf by striking
him about the head, and he retaliated
by kicking her. He soon had .' the
"nippers" on the Amazon and the
screaming she had done before paled
into Insignificance to what she now
did.
The woman asked to get a pair of
nearly new. shoes she had thrown
down in the melee, but the officer said,
"Get nothing," and marched her off
to the city bastile.
It Is strange that this termagant
could not control her temper until
the policeman 'got that instrument
called "persuaders" on her, then she
became as managable and docile as
"Mary's little lamb."
It is a pity that there are some
women, of a certain class, who ever
and anon, persist in making these
disgraceful scenes, at the expense of
our people. .
EMANCIPATION ANNIVERSARY
Celebration at Lee Avenue Christian
Church Resolutions Endorsing
Senator Foraker Adopted. :"
An audience composed of. Seme of
the best citizens of Nashvlllo assem
bled at Lea Avenue Christian Church,
Tuesday night, January .1, 1907, at 8
o'clock p. m., to celebrate the Emanci
pation. Rev. Preston Taylor was made
chairman and William Patterson, sec
retary. The exercises opened with a
song, "My country 'tis of thee," by
choir and congregation. Prayer by
Rev. C. H. Boone, pastor "of. St. Paul
A. M. E. Church, who was also select
ed to deliver the opening address. He
spoke of the progress the race has
made since their freedom, admonished
them to be loyal to each other and
to be more united as a people. He
spoke along various lines of our sta
tion in life and hoped for better re
sults in the future. Interesting ad
dresses were made by Rev. Preston
Taylor, W. H. Hodgklns, Dr. F. A,
Stewart, J. T. Turner, Hon. J. C.
Napier, Mr. Lansston, Teller of One
Cent Savings Bank, and Matt White,
an old comrade of Lincoln Post, and
one of the oldest soldiers living.
Motion by Mr. J. Thomas Turner
that a vote of thanks be returned the
pastor and members of Lea Avenue
Christian Church for the use of the
same. Carried.
Mrs. J. C. Napier, president of the
Day Home, was' then introduced and
spoke of the organization of the home,
its purposes and plans, and urged all
to render her aid and assistance for
this grand enterprise known as the
Porter Homestead, 618 Fourth eve-
nue. South. A collection of three dol
lars and forty-five cents was raised
for Brother Thomas White, a comrade
of Uncoln Post, as a charity dona
tion. . -
Motion by J. C. Napier that a com
mittee of three be appointed between
this and June to deliver addresses at
the next annual anniversary. Car
LODbc.
GRAND LODGE K. 0.s
G. C. J. P. CRAWFORD,
706 Bass Street, Nashville,
G. V. C L M. STEGALL,
Humboldt,
P. G. a J. XL LaPRADE.
Chattanooga, Te:
G. P. REV. T. J. TOWNSEND,
Box 148. Brownsville, Te:
O. M. or E. B. F. JOHNSON,
850 E. Sin Street, Chattanooga, T
G. L. J. M. EASTERLING, ' !
903 Georgia Ave., Chattanooga, 1
G. K. R. S. DR. R. W. ALLEN, j
124-128 E. 9th St, Chattanooga, 1
G. M. A. JOHN SINGLETON, !
Knoxville, I
G. I. G. A, T. HILL, I
Pulaski, 1
G. M.R. E. GEE, j
. Nashville, T.
G. O. G.A. W. GLElAVES,
Nashville, T
O. Att'y. J. THOMAS TURNEI
Nashville, 1
G. M. R. DR. A. M. TOWNSENTy
614 Webster St. Nashville. T.
Z-Z3-06-utI
ENDOWMENT BO ART): W.
nolda, Pres., W. Lv'Cansler, (
R UV .Tnhnerin Troon TJ T
" VOLUNTEER COMPANY NO.i
U. R. K. OF P., ;
Meets each Monday bight In i
Fellows Amusement Hall over
Union Transportation Co's Garag:.
H. H. BOWMAN, Copt,
J. A. O. BROUGHTON, Recordi
2-23-06-utf ,. r
DAMON LODGE, NO. 2, K. OF P.
Meets at the Pythian Temple, ct
ner of Fifth and Capitol avenues, t!
second and fourth Wednesdays of ea'
month. i I
WM. BOGER, C. C. '
W. L. CANSLER, K. of R. & 8.
STRINGER LODGEi NO. I.
Meets at Burrus Hall, corner
Cedar and McLemore s'reets, secc
and fourth Mondays of each monf
DR. P. R. BURRUS, C. C.
W. A. JAMES. K. of R. & S.
3-16-06 utf
IVANHOE LOD&IkJNQfc;;
ner of Fifth and Capitol avenues,
second and fourth Thursdays of t
month. I
J. F. IRONS. C. C. V
J. E. MILLER, K. of R. and .
S-16-06utf
TTREB LOLGE, NO. 11,
Hf anf a frit a OwrYt rTAMlA
ner of Fifth and Canltol avenues, tit
, r ft auviwi v
first and third Wednesdays of eaci:
month. ...
rr n At T.Tcnw n n
... xx. nuuiuuii, j v.
J. JB. smith, K. or it a s. .
2-23-06 tttf. i
LIGHTFOOT LODGE, NO 17
Meets at ths Pythian Temple, corn
of Fifth and Capitol avenues, the fir
and third Mondays of each month.
JOHN P. PORTER. CO.
A. L. HADDOX, K. of R. and R
2-23-06-utf
PURITY LODGE, NO. 42, K. OF 1
Meets at the Pythian Temple, CGrr
of Fifth and Capfiol avenues, secc;
and fourth Tuesdays of each montf.
BAILEY TURNERY C. C. k
W. M. ALLEN, K. of .R. and a
X
3-2-06-utf
FRIENDSHIP LODGE. NCJWA
OP P. ,
Meets at the Pythian Temple, come
of Fifth and Capitol avenues, secol
. m it . r i . v. a V.
ana iouna monaays oi eacu muma.
D. W. CRUTCHER, C. C.
THOMAS C. MOORE,
3, IC ct
and S.
2-23-06-utf
Napier, regarding the solfliersf
adopted: '
"Resolved, That In his e&orts r
cure a complete ' investigating
the charges that resulted In 'j .
charge of certain troops of thf
ty-flfth United States Infants
ator Foraker has the sym'
support of this meeticr"
Resolved, further, 7
nlze In him one of
friends of the race;
forts to secure just?
charged troops, we
our power to upholds
encourage and supp
The services bein;
Jackson .1 tl
v ;
!:.; ... .... o

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