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The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, March 01, 1907, Image 3

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- THE NASHVILLE GLOBE, FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1907.
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;ans at four Price, 1
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ENTIRELY NEW DESIGN No. 5.
FIVE OR SIX OCTAYE. SOLID OAK Oil WALNUT.
A picture of beauty and chaste refinement unapproachecl heretofore by
any manufacturer. Massive frame work, highly ornamented with expen
sive hand and machine work of the highest order. An organ that will
prove au ornament in the most finely furnished parlor in the country.
C AS 2. Made of the tlnest selected white oak or walnut, very heavy
and massive, securely framed, doweled, paneled, screwed and glued to
gether. Deep panels, handsome carvings of beautiful designs, elaborate
turnings, mouldings and fret work in key slip, large French plate mirror in
top, 13x13, large closed music pocket with hinged front and safely lamp
stands, hand rubbed and polished.
ACTIOiN,-In this case we can place actions B, C, D, E, F, G, or II,
all of them pipe toned, sweet and melodious.
SIZE AND UEIGHT.- When set up for use this Organ, in
6 octaves, measures 81 inches high, 52 inches long and 24 inches deep, Net
weight 325 lbs., gross weight (boxed) 450 lbs. When boxed for export the
five octave organ occupies 54 cubic feet of space and the six octave 56 cubic
feet.
EVERY ORGAN FULLY WARRANTED TEN YEARS.
ADDRESS
National Baptist Publishing Board,
523 Second Avenue, North, Nashville, Tenn.
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Friday night, March 8, Miss Green,
Instructor In elocution, will give a re
cital In Memorial Chapel, assisted
with musical numbers by Miss Flint.
Some time towards the last of March
Professor Andrews, of the Oberlin
Conservatory of Music, will give a re-
thousand people of the race. Tuske
gee, Ala., is forty miles east of Mont
gomery and is one of the most beauti
ful towns in the state, situated on a
site overlooking all the adjacent ter
ritory. The scenery about it is not
excelled in all the South and seems
cital in Memorial Chapel. Professor Just adapted for the purpose it is used
Andrews has been here several times
before, and the music lovers of Nash
ville, need no introduction to him, nor
do they need a second invitation to
come and hear him.
Sunday morning, March 3, the
Lord's Supper will be celebrated in
Union Church. Those to unite with
the church are Mr. A. M. Lyle, of Ten
nessee, as associate member, and Miss
Douglass E. Branson, of Arkansas,
and Miss Desrette Hodges, of Illinois,
on confession. The pastor, Prof. C.
W. Morrow, will preach.
The meeting of the Y. M. C. A. last
Sunday was a missionary meeting. It
was in charge of Professor Waterman
and Miss Khule. The meeting on
March 3 will be led by Mr. W. E. Key,
of the Sophomore Class.
Last Sunday the Y. P. S. C. B. was
led by Miss Ethel Glenn.
The Junior College Class will repeat
the play "Merchant of Venice," In the
near future for the benefit of Howard
Chapel
Miss Lizzie Wells, who is in the mu
sic department of Flsk University,
will lead Christian Endeavor at How
ard Chapel Sunday nlgnt.
Among the visitors who are to be
with us next Wednesday are Rev
Frank Fitch, D. D., of Bu.falo, N. Y.,
who will deliver the dedicatory ad
dress, Rev. Lewyllen Pratt, D. D., of
Norwich, Conn., Rev. Jas. Cooper, D,
D., Secretary of the American Mission
ary Asoclation, Rev. Jas. W. Bixter,
D. D., of New London, Conn., and Mr
Frank Leavens, of Broadway Church,
Norwich, Conn
Miss Pearl Erwin left school last
Saturday on account of illness. She is
expected to return in a few days. Her
home is Bellbuckle, Tenn.
The members of the D. L. V., Deca
gynlan and Tanner Art Clubs are con
rentrating their efforts towards fur
nishlng their new club room.
Little Sonoma Talley, who was sick
so long with scarlet fever, is well
again, and Professor Talley is again
performing his school duties,
SOCIETY
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SOUTHERN TRIP
Tuskegee is an international word
known and read by all men on either
side of the waters, and everybody
feels the keenest interest in the in
stitution, be he white or black, for ed
ucation is blended into all nations
alike. If the brother in black is igno
rant his shadow falls on his white
brother and God has made of one blood
all notions though the skin may be
white, black or red and yet the same
blood unchanged and what is the in
terest of one man must be the wel
fare of all. From the time the
Emancipation Proclamation was put
In force until now the races have been
contending for more light and wisdom,
and it is believed to be the best mon
ey a parent can spend on his children
The same money given to a heir might
be used as the Prodigal used his; but
an educated person can't spend his
education. He must bold to it.
Though he may not use it to the best
for. The farming is done largely by the
students on a scientific plan, with
heir hundreds of mules, horses, plows,
harrows, wagons, carts and other Im
plements. They cultivate this Im
mense tract of land and raise and con
sume all their wheat, corn, vegetables,
3tc. To visit, their large kitchen and
lining hall and see eight or ten hun
Ired pounds of meat and the great
akery, turning out hundreds of loaves
if bread for each meal, besides bush-
Is of onions, potatoes, turnips, etc.,
0 ieecl sixteen nunarea seatea at the
'able at once, one would judge it is
10 ordinary family Tuskegee has to
provide for.
The dairy . contains one hundred
ind seventy-five milk cows, and last
vear they made 1G,332 pounds of but-
i-or Tflvprv row has n nnmo rind a
'.tail as cleanly kept as care can make
it, the students study the cow, the
Tiilk, the butter, as well as the food.
The whole analysis of the dairy Is
tudied .to protection and the results
are no dairy in the country can excel
it.
The students make the furniture
lsed in the buildings, such as bed-
5teads, dressers, washstands, chairs,
tables, book cases and mattresses, and
nowhere have we seen schools so well
furnished as the building at Tuskegee.
The machinery, wagons, plows, bug
gies, harnesses, etc., are all manufac
tured on the grounds.
Last year the tailor-shop turned out
over 1,000 new pieces; the millinery
1,412 hats and other articles; the
dressmaking 1,309 peices, besides 2,309
oieces of plain sewing, and the mat
tress division 5,118 mattresses, 1,307
brooms and baskets were manufac
tured. Besides Tuskegee makes its
wn brick and builds all of her own
ouildings. Among he students are all
rades of mechanics such as archi
tects, stone masons, brick layers, car
penters, tinners, plasterers, painters,
ate. They have one of the finest eUc
trical plants that can be found any
where. All the instruments are in
stalled, lines run and buildings wired
and lighted by her own boys; in the
foundry they mould all castings in
use.
The landscape gardener has charge
of the greenhouses and the grounds
are as artistically arranged as in any
city in the south. The young men
are organized in a regiment of cadets
and are drilled in the latest methods
used in the United States army. Spec
ial attention is given to gymnastics
for the young women and they have a
well arranged gymnasium fitted up
and two large bath houses with swim
ming pools are connected with the
men and women's dormitories
The Library Building is the gift of
Carnegie; the architecture is colonial
and cost $20,000; it is two story and is
50 by 110. An effort is being made to
secure every pamphlet, book, news
paper, magazine and other works pub
lished by our people, so that this 11
ADGES
31
All Styles and Prices,
one without refinement. Education is brary will be the center 0 informat on
irond for nil- thmiri, ho mav ha . nH. regarding literature published by the
oner of a free man, rich or poor, white
or black, he can find enjoyment in in
telligence.
If education made George Washing
ton a great man, why should it be
thought strange that it should make
race, lne uiDie training scnooi nas
in enrollment of seventy-three this
year and has sent out fifty-three grad
uates. The chapel seats over 2,000 per
sons and it is one of the grandest
ights to see the auditorium filled with
t it. 1
men ana women, ana uieir
ft Booker Washington a great man? The 'ounS men ana women, aim iui
S Lm.A arivant Mnn -ii Hw Uhoir of over 100 voices accompanied
4
FISK NOTES.
"Resolved, That government owner
ship of natural monopolies is best for
the public good," was the subject of
an interesting debate in the Senior
Class in Economics Monday and Tues
day. Affirmative speakers: G. T. Over
street and Miss Florence G. Jackson.
Negative: B. W. Payne and Miss M.
M. Houston. On the first day an hour
and a half was taken up by the speak
ers in presenting their main argu
ments. On the second day nearly an
hour was taken up by Payne and
Overstreet in rebuttal. Both sides
had spent much time and labor in
preparing their arguments, and the
efficiency and weight of the arguments
on both sides were shown by the fact
that according to vote of the class the
debate was practically a draw, four
members of the class voting in favor
of the negative and three members
and Professor Morrow voting in fa
vor of the affirmative. Professor Scrih
ner, with her Sophomore Rhetoric
Class, visited the first day of the de
bate. Other visitors were President
MarrM, Miss Ballentine and Miss
Uovnton, and on the second day Mr.
J. C. Russell. Miss Ross, the acting
president of the class, was ill those
two days, and Mr. II. R. Merry was
r.ipcted to preside. Mr. II. F. Mitchell
was timekeeper.
Mrs. II. F. Mitchell, wife of one of
the members of the Senior Class, left
for her home, Lake Providence, La
Monday night, after a pleasant visit of
more than two months. Mrs. Mitcnen
made a host of friends while here, and
m,,ct enrob nmt.rA o -,m by the orchestra of 18 pieces, all joia
and useful people. Some nationalities lng in , s T , , a a
XV 11 ho trroafcr thon nlU-o lUn I 10 OUr UOU, WUU UiUS icuccmcu uo p-uu
m nnrs- snmp Bvi n nm(i. siven us such a privilege to worship
zrpater harvest thn nth . s him under the guidance of Tuskegee.
The constant aim is to correlate the
literary and industrial training that
the student cannot get one without
especially was she dear to the mem
bers of the Senior Class who had
flrlnntpfl tipr na "mnflioi." OV, -...in
nrobablv visit us nin nt Pnmmon soil Is better. some has a greater ad
nient. vantage in the season and some has
wwinrsrhiv mornino- ha irtni, n Metter attention than the other. This
... VUU ULil CA.11 I . I ,1 L . A
niversarv of Longfellow's birth Dr 13 weI1 illustrated by our great men the other; Hence tne students go to
Merrill gave a very instructive and in- aml women of the race. Any one can school one day and the next day ne
tercstino: talk in ehnnpl nn T.nnpfpi. easily see what education has done for works at his trade and still to accom
low and his home life. He rend twn our race. Will it not compare favora- odate all, the school is operated day
of Longfellows poems, "The Psalm ,)lv with any other people under the and night. You never find an idler
of T.ifft" nnrl "Thp nhllrlrpn'a TTnnr " SRIT1P rirpnmst.mpps? Wp havn fur. In TusKpcpp: everv hour must le
Instead of the usual Jubilee song, nished our ratio of farmers, mechan- accounted for. There is a great demand
Prof. J. W. Work sang "Onaway." los, business and professional men. for the 'Tuskegee graduates. A post
from Longfellow's Hiawatha, set to The race has always stood side by lion awaits them and as soon as they
music by the great Negro composer, side with other races to do its duty receive their diplomas they are placed
namuei coieriage-iayior. whether in the time of peace or war. at the head of some enterprise
The dedicatory exercises of Chase and if our good deeds were as widely rpne Tuskegee school opened about
Hall, to be held on the afternoon of published as our bad ones, in what a tr0tv.fivp vpnr? psro in a rented house
March C, will be in charge of the visit- different attitude it would place us L.uv, tiii.tv rmniis: to-rlav the total
ors irom tne wortn ana l'Jast who will before the world. I for one would not ,.aio nf nvnnortv enuinment and en-
spend the entire day here. object to our had being told if the good ,,mnnnt a i,mit ! 075.000 with an
Wednesday, February 20, the post- Ave are doing could only be known; as onnnai mv roll of $192 152.03 for
season game between the Sophomores it is told of Martin Luther while bound teachers' salary and current expenses,
and the Bandits was played off, the n nrlson. t.hft rtflV,r WBntinff to LcacieiS M L ,,,,.
you are a sinner, an insurrector. a v m.ntPr suirf it is the masnct that
preacher of false doctrine and a bad hag attracted the wealthiest and best
Hadnott, captain of the Bandits, and
Smith, tho Sophomore's center, each
threw two baskets from the field, and
Richmond, Bandit, and Dawson, and
Brumfield, Sophomores, got one bask
et each. Brumfield made six success
ful free throws out of ten chances,
while Hadnott got only one out of
five trials.
Standing of Teams.
Team. P. w.
Sophomores 6 5
Outlaws 6 5
Freshmen , 6 1
Bandits 6 1
L.
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man in general?" Luther said, "Grant
all you say is true if you will add these
words, The blood of Jesus Christ
cleansed from all sins,' granting that
all is said of us is true." If the world
could only know what Tuskegee is do
ing for the uplifting of humanity,
we would be willing to rest our case
Per. wl- them.
.833 Tuskegee Is a city of schools, con-
.833 sisting 0f twenty-three hundred acres
.107 of land with eighty buildings, and the
.167 grounds are inhabited by about three
$( MEMBER i3
3 it i I
VT J ti H
if .r,v
iliiii
TjDc are prepared to make
all kinds of badges for so
cieties and associations a
prices that are as reason
able as can be had any
where.
&Q$) &
STtcvj are made of the best
satin ribbon, stamped with
pure gold leaf and trim
med with imported gold
bullion fringe.
Write us for prices and specifications
stating the number of badges
you want.
CJ-Addross
National Daplist Publishing Board
11. H. BOYD, Scc'y.
NASIIVIllE, TtNN
people of the land.. At the head of
this institution stands Prof. Booker
T. Washington, who has made the
school the greatest normal and indus
trial institution of the age, and year
by year he and the school have in
creased in popularity and usefulness,
and before them stand to-day a vast
multitude of people anxious for a
continuance of this great work.
PRESTON TAYLOR.
(The End.)
GO TO
MILL
THE CASH CKOCEll
1806 JEFFERSON STREET,
For First-Class Staple-, and Fancj
Groceries, Cigars and Totowco
FRESH VEGETABLES DAILY
Fine Table Butter, Fresh Eggs
Our Policy Cash Sales and Small Prof-ts
Ve Keep only the liest
l2-24-'o6-tf

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