OCR Interpretation


The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, March 08, 1907, Image 7

Image and text provided by University of Tennessee

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86064259/1907-03-08/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 7

THE NASHVILLE GLOBS, FRIDAY. AlitiL B, 1S07.
.THE NASII7ILLS CLCBE, FRIDAY MARCH 8, 1907.
SOCITY
BADGES
All Styles and Prices.
J!jV". MEMBER:-
'ml
SOME BORDER TROUBLE.
Special to the Globe.
San Antonio, Texas.
There are at large on the Texas bor
der between Texas and Mexico so
many outlaws and bandits that at
times life is almost continually in
jeopardy. The following is but a sam
ple: A special from Mazatlan, Mexico,
says:
"Six Rurales, as they lay asleep in
the shelter of rocks in the vicinity of
Tepic, were butchered by the notori
ous bandit. Enrique Chavez, and his
band. Ranchmen and farmers in the
Tepic district are in a condition bor
dering on panic, as it is rumored that
Chavez has gathered around him other
men as bloody and cruel as himself.
Many efforts have in the past few
months been made to capture Chavez,
but his luck, nerve and knowledge of
the country have always saved him."
Tt was on the Texas border where
the late Dick Wallace, of Texas, was
killed, and it is also known that Ft.
Brown at Brownsville Is on the bor
der. There are continued efforts by
both governments to apprehend these
outlaws.
sibly adjourn to visit the Exposition.
If Nashville is not well represented,
it will be a discredit to its reputation.
lililiil
TjDc are prepared to make
all kinds of badges for so
cieties and associations a
prices that are as reason
able as can be had any
where. M s 04
o$ o2
evj are made of the best
satin ribbon, stamped with
pure gold leaf and trim
med with imported gold
bullion fringe.
Write us for prices and specifications
stating the number of badges
you want
tfj-Address
National Baptist Publishing Board
R. H. BOYD, Sec'y.
523 Second Ave.. N. NASHVILLE, TENN
GO TO
Mill
THE CASH GROCER
1806 JEFFERSON STREET,
For First-Class Staple and Fane
, Groceries, Cigiirs and Toliaeco
FRESH VEGETABLES DAILY
Fine Table Butter, Fresh Eggs
vOur Policy Cash Sales und Small Profits.
We Keep only the 13ef
THE LORD'S SUPPER.
This service is the most solemn of
all the services conducted In a church.
It Is commemorating the death and
suffering of one who died on Calvary,
and should be so exemplified as the
most important service in connection
with the church. Vessels of the best
make should be purchased by all
churches in administering this service.
The church supply department of the
National Baptist Publishing Board is
furnishing- to the churches the best
grade of quadruple-plated table silver
ware ever ofered. The sets range in
prices from $21.50 to $25.00 per set. A
set constitutes one flagon, or wine
pitcher, two plates and two chalices
or goblets. A few of these have just
been received from the factory and
will be shown to any party or persons
interested in church supplies, if they
will call at the National Baptist Pub
lishing Board, 523 Second avenue,
North.
A SLICK THIEF.
There has been operating-: among
the residents of, Patterson street an
extremely slick thief and a Negro
thief. Several days ago he was up
and down the street trying to hire
some one to do some washing for a
white family of the West End; when
the lady went to look for the place she
found no such people living anywhere
near. The man returned in a few
days-, went to another house in the
neighborhood and pretended that he
had just found a large sum of money.
After questioning the lady very much
as to how she lived, whether she
owned her place, who took care of
her and where she kept her money,
he offered to give her one dollar in
velum if she would let him use five
dollars of her change for a few min
utes. This lady did not yield however.
li' was in, the neighborhood .icnin
Wednesday, entered another home,
found an old lady and told her that
e had some larce bills nrwl w.mtprl tn
make some change for a man who wa?
in the street and if she would let him
have six dollars he would return tha
six and give her one for the use of it
as soon as he could go down on .Cedar
street and return. The ladv. who is
feeble, went to her landlady, borrowed
the six dollars, gave it to the man, who
left and has not returned from Cedar
;treet yet. 'She became alarmed
when he did not come back in a rea-
onable length of time, and renorted
the matter to the police. They were
busy all day Wednesday catching and
carrying 'different colored men to the
residence for identification.
IS TOM COX ALIVE?
Two Sundays ago a Globe reporter
was passing a very noted saloon in the
business part of Nashville and heard
a part of a very interesting conversa
tion regarding the possibility of Tom
Cox being alive. It will be remem
bered that. Tom Cox was tried and
sentenced to be hanged in this city a
year or more ago. He was charged
with the murder of a policeman and
just a few days prior to the execution
it was announced that he had com
mitted suicide, thus cheating the law
of its claim. It had been heard fre
quently that the real Tom Cox is not
dead, but alive, but this rumor has
never been substantiated by any
proof. The conversation in front of
this saloon was to the effect that Cox
had been seen only recently. One of
the party made the statement that
he would bet his life that he saw Tom
Cox in Chicago last month. The news
and the remark came so unexpected,
that it caused the reporter to retrace
his steps, but evidently the three men
noticed that he was trying to catch
some of the conversation and it was
changed ere he . could hear more re
marks that would lead him to make an
investigation. Authorities in Nashville
know that Cox committed suicide and
his remains were moved from the jail'
of Davidson County. Was this his
ghost that was seen in Chicago? Who
can answer?
THE JAMESTOWN EXPOSITION.
The Jamestown Exposition will soon
swing open its majestic gates to the
world. That the Negro will play a con
splcuous part in this Exposition is a
foregone conclusion. The building to
be especially erected for Negro ex
hibits, it is said, is already near com
pletion. It is to be a magnificent piece
cf architecture occupying a beautiful
sight in the Exposition grounds. Nash
ville ought to be well represented In
these exhibition halls. We have in
1 his city much to be placed on exhibi
ticn. The Overland Steam Coach,
which was invented and patented by
R. L. Woods, including engine, auto
mobile and breaks, might be there;
the schools of Nashville ought to have
a place; the two Publishing Houses
in this city might exhibit advantag
eously to their respective denomina
tions as well as to tt is city. ' The
Government is certainl encouraging
the Negroes in these efforts, even
though it has been styled as a "Jim
Crow Exhibition." It will commemo
rate the landing of the twenty Ne
groes at Jamestown in a Dutch, vessel
in 1619, who were the first Negroes to
land in America, according to history.
This exhibition will typify the prog
ltss along the educational, Industrial,
financial, moral and religious lines of
these twenty slaves from the 250
years of bondage and the 40 years of
freedom. That the exposition will be
well attended by Negroes is already
certain. They will come from Geor
gia, the two Carolinas, the two Vir
ginias and Maryland especially; then,
too, the National Baptist Convention
which meets at Washington will pos-
AN APPRECIABLE GIFT. -
Mr. W. O. Tate, of Eigth avenue,
North, is the proud recipient of a
beautiful rceer&chaum pipe which was
presented to him as a souvenir direct
from Naples, Italy, by Mr. Ben Lin-
dauer, of the firm of Herman Bros.,
Lindauer & Co., who recently re
turned from a visit to the old country
Mr. .Tate says it is the most apprecia
ble gift he has received In many
years, excluding a very handsome,
gold-mounted pair of eye-glasses re
ceived of Mr. J. C. Napier several
days ago.
, PEARL HIGH SCHOOL NOTES.
The enthusiasm of the colored
teachers has reached a high pitch
over the subject of Manual Training.
The surprise was great when every
teacher was ordered up by the 'Super
'.ntendent for a first lesson. The in
terest was greater when Miss Ethel
Northern, a teacher of manual train
ing in the white schools, began to in
struct the tenchers about the mean
ing and use of the loom, the darner,
and the weaver. But the awkward
ness, the laughter, the nervousness,
the success, ihe failure, the fun, were
greatest of all. The ladies did finely,
but .it was certainly amusing to see
the big hands of the men, holding the
warp in one hand and trying to thread
the darner in the other. Their fin
gers got heavier, the warp grew wider
ina me eye or tne needle u rorgor,
our teacher told us not to say needle),
I mean the darner, became smaller
Great drops of perspiration burst out
on the men's foreheads, their fingers
got stiff and refused to work, their
knees trembled. Excitement was
high. In the bewilderment of this
new experience some forgot how
many inches made a foot, and when
told to measure half an Inch, many
measured a half a, foot.
The ladies made a splendid begin
ning. In tying the seamstress' knot
in measuring quarter inches, in put
ting in the warp and woof, in thread
iftg the neeile (I forgot again), I mean
in threading the darners and weavers
their light, nimble fingers were per
fectly at home. Some of the rug
work was lovely and elicited praise
from the tencher; but the other work
well; let that pass, the less said, the
better. Your reporter heard many
compliments passed. on Miss North
ern. She is certainly an expert teach
er, Patient, kind, painstaking, gentle
nroficient, energetic, she has made a
profound Impression for good on the
colored teachers. The Manual Train
ing Class will meet once a week on
Tuesday, and your reporter will keep
the Globe informed.
COLUMBIA NOTES.
At the last mother's mectincr held
theHIch School buil'Mn", Pev. T. W
Hampton made an addrps: subject
Home Influence. TYe discourse w
an excellent, prnrticil nnd entertni
'ng one. and wns listened to bv a Inn
number of mothers i friends of th
school. These monthly meetings a
moving tot he of great' heln to th
teachers, parents and community
general, as it brings in closer contn
the parents am. teeners nnd clo"
allied to these Is the elero-v.
such co-onorptlve efforts from the p
nit, school rni home, much good w
be accomplished.
Miss Lizzie Bradslinw spent Satur
day and Sunday at home last week
She la one o Maury. County's progres
at
as
p
e
re
p
in
et
'IV
th
ml
ill
V
K
V
K
K
V
1
If
m
K
V
h
V
K
i
X
V
91
K
ti
tt
i
k '
fc
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
i
X.
X
X
X
X
X
X
K
I
X
H
X
X
Church 0
nans at Your Price,!
t -wli., -f! - V'
,. "T "
- r'4
i. '' in'
i
if iff
1 u; ( J.
- -iV
i
'11
1
1 l M; In : :J
t i v-i V- v: .
ENTIRELY KEW DESIGN No. 5.
a mi hi n 1 1 limn ii
FIVE Oil SIX OCTAVE. SOLID OAK OH WALNUT.
A picture of beauty and chaste refinement unapproached heretofore by
any manufacturer. Massive frame work, highly ornauuntcd with expen
sive hand and machine work of the highest order. An organ that will
prove an ornament in the most finely furnished parlor in the country.
CASE. Made of the finest selected white oak or walnut, very heavy
and massive, securely framed, doweled, paneled screwed and glued to
gether. Deep panels, handsome carvings of beautiful designs, elaborate
turnings, mouldings and fret work in key slip, large French plate mirror in
top. 13x13, large closed music pocket with hinged front and saftlylamp
stands, hand rubbed and polished.
ACTIO In this case we can place action H, C, I), E, V, G, or H,
all of them pipe toned, sweet and melodious
SIZE A IN L 1AE I G H T. When set up for use this Organ, in
6 octaves, measures Si inches high, 52 inches long and 24 inches deep Net
weight 325 lbs., vross weight f boxed) 450 lbs. When boxed for export the
five octave organ occupies 54 cubic feet of space and the six octave 56 cubic
feet.
EVERY ORGAN FILLY AVAKR ANTED TEN YEARS.
ADDRESS
aptist Publishing Board,
523 Second Avenue, North, Nashville, Term.
National 0
ft
St
.1
$
.X
X
X
X
X
X
$
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
' X
X
t
X
X
X
X
X
;
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Only 3 More W
EEKS
wauL-u.ep'JUjiL.
Those who wish an Elegant
Spring Suit for Easter should
have their order placed today
SEE OUR SPRING FASHIONS
E. R. CARNEY,
418 Cedar St. FASHIONABLE TAILOR.
Kive teachers, and ter.ches at Gravel
Hill.
The Rev. Mr. DcBoo, of Birming
ham. Ala., is visiting here and preach
ing at the different churches.
Dr. J, Q. Johmon, 1. E. of the Co
lumbia District. A. M. K. Church, will
preach at St. Paul the second Sunday
in Maich.
Mr. Walter Green and' family have
moved from Hlghth to S. Glade street,
in the home formerly occupied by Mr.
Ed Morton.
Miss liallio Dlckcrsou contins
quite feeble. It is hoped by her manv
friends that she will fooh be herself
again.
Mr. Sam Hirdsong Is gradually Im
proving after quite a serious spell
of sickness.
Leonard Lowery is very sick at -the
house of his mother, Mrs. Jennie Wig
fall.. Ho recently came from Louis
ville, Ky., where he has made his
home for Ave or six years.
; Mrs. Florence White, of Chicago, is
! visiting her mother, Mrs. Ellen Nlck-
elsou, on IligU street.

xml | txt