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The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, April 12, 1907, Image 4

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THE NASHVILLE GLOBE, FRIDAY, AWilL 12, 1007.
The Nashville Globe.
Published Every Friday in the Xca!luR?0,n
a. Odd Fellow Hall, No. 447 Fourth Ave
nue, North, Nashville, Tenn.,
THE GLOBE PUBLISHING CO.
Telephone 433-1
J. 0. BATTLE Editob
Entered as second-class matter January 19,
1906, at the post office at "hv,Veynllne!'
see, under the act of Congress of March 3.
1879-
No Notice taken of anonymous contribu
tions. SUBSCRIPTIONS IN ADVANCE.
One Year J2
One Month
Single Copy ..
Notify the office whi-n you fail to get your
paper.
ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED
UPON APPLICATION.
BEADING MATTES BATK8.
cents per line for each insertion.
cents per line for each insertion (bbc
i
Contracts for i.ooo line, to be uVen in a
year, made at 3 cents per line.
Advertising copy- shoot' U the office
not later than Tuesday 9 a. m. of each ween.
TO THE PUBLIC
Any erroneous reflection upon the charac
ter, standing or reputation of any person
firm or corporation, which may appear in the
columns of 'tHE NASIIVI1.l GLOBE will
he gladly corrected upon t.eing brought to the
attention of the management
Send correspondence for publication so m
to reach this office Monday. No. natter in
tended for current issue winch arnves as late
as Thursday can appear in that number, as
Thursday is press day.
All news matter sent us for publication
must be written only on one side of the pa
per, and should be accompanied by the name
of the contributor; not necessarily for publi
cation, but as an evidence of good faith.
THE CAMPAIGN OPENS.
Nineteen months until the election
of a President, but the campaign is on
with a vengeance. The storm centre
in the republican party at present is
Ohio. It is in this state that the fate
of Roosevelt's candidate is to be de
cided. Mr. Taft's candidacy was
launched from the White House last
.week with a five million dollar con
spiracy to down the Rooseveltian poli
cies, for the accompanying pyrotech
nics. This is followed by an interview
from the President's son-in-law en
dorsing the big breezy Secretary of
War. Senator Foraker, who repre
sents the opposition to the President
naming his successor, explicitly ex
plained his position Wednesday. Ohio
is under the glare of the calcium lights
with special spot lights for Foraker
and Taft, and, since the former has
made such a fight for the boys of the
Twenty-fifth, the outcome will be
awaited with interest by Negroes
throughout the country.
THE NASHVILLE BRAND.
The hot weather evidently caused
"The Nashville Brand" to mistake
Palm Sunday for Easter. She was out
in all her glory last Sunday. Her hat
was a dream, her dress, a rhapsody,
her oxford ties well," we didn't look
at her feet. Nashville (Tenn.) Globe.
You didn't say anything about how
their faces looked, brother.' Spring
field's "beauties" were out Palm Sun
day and Easter; their clothes were not
only shining resplendently, but their
very faces were ' fac-similes of angelic
glory and beauty. The Springfield
Ull.) Forum.
We'll bet that the St. Luke's Herald,
of Richmond, Va., was satisfied to
hear of the hat, the dress and the
shoes.
Springfield, Tenn., jealous of the no
toriety given its namesakes in Mis
souri and Ohio, is now trying to get
some free advertising by refusing to
accept mail from one of the rural
route carriers because he is a Negro.
Teddy has quit doing stunts like the
Indianola affair. He has been broad
ened so much by oflicial cares that he
devotes his time to such anaemic
sports as tennis and calling men liars!
The Mobile Weekly Press is out in
a special edition celebrating its thir
teenth anniversary.
John Temple Graves wants Bryan
to nominate Roosevelt on the demo
cratic ticket. Bryan objects for the
present. It is now up to the White
House to accuse Bryan of being in a
conspiracy.
Near the close of tho session the
Legislature seems to be getting into
the old rut of passing bills to "keep
the Negro "down."
FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
BRANCH OFFICE OF THE LIFE
AND CASUALTY INSURANCE CO.
On Monday, April 9, 1906, the Life
and Casualty Insurance Company of
the State of Tennessee, opened a
branch office of its company in the
Pythian Temple, 428 Fifth Avenue, N.
The running of this department was
placed in the hands of Mr. Aaron J.
Dodd, as its Superintendent, with a
corps of energetic agents commis
sioned to solicit insurance among the
colored people of the city. This de
partment was and Is manaeed exclu
sively by colored agents. The work
has proven to be a success and has
given general satisfaction to the pa
trons. As the work increased the
force was increased also. Mr. Richard
A. Ewin was promoted to the position
of superintendent, which position he
now holds. Under his charge the
branch department has grown rapidly
and a guaranteed success is assured
the company. Monday evening, April
8th, Mr. R. A. Ewin and his corps of
agents observed an occasion general
ly known as the anniversary of the de
partment under their control at Sr.
John A. M. E. Church. A large and
appreciative audience was present.
The Economical Steam Laundry Co.
is now running delivery wagons and
will be glad to have their agents call
for your packages. It guarantees
first-class service. Try its work un
der its new management. Special
rates for family washing. Send your
laundry early in the . week in order
to get the best work and avoid the
rush. Telephone Main 4095.
4-12-07-5t.
LODGE DIRECTORY.
The Sons of Relief.
Meets at Boyd Building, on Cedar
Itreet. first and third Wednesdays of
ach month.
R. P. CARTER, President.
JAS. R. ANDERSON, Sec'y.
T HOWARD CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH.
The farewell service at Howard
Congregational Church, given in hon
or of Mrs.. Virginia . W. Broughton, the
State Superintendent of the Colored
Women's Christian Temperance Un
ion, who sails soon for Rome, Italy, to
attend the International Sunday
School Convention, was well attended
and was hearty and enthusiastic. Mrs.
Broughton is too well known to the
readers of the Globe to need introduc
tion a graduate of Fisk University
with the first class sent out from that
famous institution, a tireless worker
in church and reform organizations, a
speaker of unusual power, and one of
the most prominent Negro women in
the South. The local W. C. T. U., of
which Mrs. James Bond is President,
gave the farewell service.
Mrs. Bond presided. Mrs. Plnkston
presided at the piano and lead in the
service of song. Miss Robinson read
the scripture lesson and Mrs. Susan
Lowe led in prayer. "Blest be the tie
was then sung.
The president of the local union in
troduced Mrs. Broughton, who took as
her text the motto of the W. C. T. U
"For God and Home and Native
Land." She showed why Negroes
should be interested in the W..C. T. U
It stands for good morals, pure reli
gion, pure homes, pure politics; it
stands for childhood and womanhood:
it is the foe of the saloon, and the sa
loon is the Nesro's greatest enemy
Negroes must line up against the sa
loon. She said that she hoped to
creditably represent the Negro wom
anhood of America.
Bishop Phillips spoke of "Fellow
ship, and gave expression to senti
ments of appreciation and esteem.
He spoke highly of the character and
work of Mrs. Broughton, and heartily
endorsed the Union and its work.
Miss Perkins spoke of the local
work and pledged the state President
that the work would be carried on
with energy while she was abroad.
Mrs. Bond wished her a "bon voy
age." Deacon J. C. Napier bade her fare
well in a few well chosen words. He
referred to the time when the colored
people of Nashville were closer to
gether than now, and spoke of the
great work to the community of Mrs.
Broughton's father and mother. He
was a temperance man and in sympa
thy with the growing temperance sen
timent. A free will offering was taken
for Mrs. Broughton.
"God be with you till we meet
igain,' was sung as the audience came
forward and shook Mrs. Broughton's
hand and bade her farewell for a time.
The benediction was pronounced by
Rev. James Bond.
PEARL HIGH SCHOOL NOTES.
The baseball game between the
High School team and the second
team of Fisk University will be played
on the Fisk Campus, Saturday after
noon, April 13, at 2:30 o'clock. This
game was scheduled for last Saturday,
April f!, but on account of rain had to
bo postponed.
The hall and classrooms will soon
resound with the eloquence of Com
mencement speakers. The valedicto
rian has handed in her oration and it
Is now going through the process of
criticism, elimination and digestion.
Considerable boiling down was found
i 1
necessary. On tho whole, however.
the piece possessed considerable mer
it, ine subject. "Night brines out
tho stars," is something new and
offers a wide field for treatment The
salutatorian will SDeak on the suhiert
of "The two Washingtons." The lives
Of George and Booker will be contrast
ed in a unique and instructive way.
considerable surgical work had to be
done on this oration before it reached
a state to be presented to the public.
l our reporter understands that Prof.
Smith, the principal, has decided to
cut out all that flow of gush and
thanks to the Superintendent and
Board, which has characterized the
pieces of former speakers. The public
will hear very little of that in the fu
ture. Just enough will be said to let
tne authorities know that Negroes ap
preciate their opportunities.
The class la manual training has
now taken up basket making, under
tne direction of Prof. E. C. Andrews,
of the white corps. This work appears
to be more difficult than rasr weavinc
and gave a majority of the teachers
some little trouble. Mrs. Anderson,
of Napier, and Miss Pinkard. of Pearl.
impressed your reporter as the most
apt and efficient in this branch.
ANNUAL BOARD MEETING
Sunday School Union Dr. Chappelle
Makes Good a Report Bishop
Turner Lectures at Payne
Chapel.
The regular annual meeting of the
Board of-Managers of the Sunday
School Union of the African Method
ist Episcopal Church, convened on
Wednesday in the office of the Pub-
ishing House, 206 Public Square. A
lull attendance of the board was pres-
nt, and the regular routine of busi-
icss was gone through. Dr. Chappelle,
he secretary of the institution, sub
mitted a report that was creditable to
him and which pleased the board to
the uttermost. His report showed that
while there had been an increase in
his expenses, there had also been a
aorrsponding increase in his receipts.
This institution is the oldest among
Negroes to start the publication of
Sunday school periodicals. It was or
ganized in 1882, by Dr. C. S. Smith,
now a bishop in his church. Dr. Smith
was at the head of this institution un
til he wa selected to the episcopacy
in 1900 at Columbus, Ohio. Dr. Chap
pelle succeeded him in that year. In
coming to Nashville, he found nothing
here but the bare walls of the house.
He at once went to work and in less
Chan two years had installed a plant
that was second to none. He bought
the very best machinery and printing
material that could be had, and is
fuming out more work and better
work than has been turned out from
the house during its existence. His
report showed that it was necessary
from time to time to Increase both
the number of employees and the
amount of machinery and printing ma
terial. The total receipts for the year
were $36,482, which is an increase
over all previous years. The board
unanimously adopted his report and
expressed themselves as being highly
pleased with the manner in which he
conducts his business.
Dr. Chappelle Is being favorably
considered as a candidate for the bish
opric at the next session of the sener
al conference, which convenes in Nor
folk, Va., in May, 1908, and the great
record he has made during his admin
istration as secretary and treasurer of
the Sunday School department of his
church, in the minds of many, entitle
h-m to the honor.
The members of the board present
were Bishop H. M. Turner, of Atlanta,
Ga.; Rev. J. C. Williams, Sumter, S.
C; Rev. J. A. Jones, Shelby ville,
Tenn.; Rev. J. M. Turner, Lexington,
Ky.; Rev. L. Gaines, Baltimore, Md.;
Messrs. L. Winter, C. S. Randals and
Richard Hill, of Nashville. Bishop
Lee, who is the bishop of the confer
ences of Tennessee and Arkansas,
was also present and visited the ses
sions of the board.
Bishop Turner lectured at Payne
Chapel A. M. El Church on Wednes
day night to a large and appreciative
audience. Every one who heard him
expressel themselves as having been
greatly benefited by being present.
Bishop Turner is a man of rare abil
ity, and is conceded to be living ahead
of his time. Hie is well stricken with
age, but is vigorous and active, al
ways prosecuting the cause of his
race. The members of tho board re
turned to their several homes Wednes
day night and Thursday morning.
Bishop Turner returned to Atlanta, Ga.,
and Bishop Lee left for Shelbyville,
Tenn., to hold the annual board meet
ing of the Turner Normal and Indus
trial School of that place.
JAMESTOWN EXPOSITION NOTES.
The accommodation for visitors will
he ample and the rates will be reason
able. M,r. L. W. Bright, the wealthi
est colored man in Norfolk, is putting
up an elegant hotel t a cost of $20.
0000. It is called "The Lit Vernon,"
and will have all modern improve
ments. He is also adding several
rooms to his beautiful cott:ige by the
sea, near the Exposition grounds,
which will be opened to guests. A
group of business men are planning
to erect a hotel adjacent to the Expo
sition reservation, to be called "The
Brighton. Beach Hotel,"
3
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ENTIRELY NEW
FIVE OR SIX OCTAVE.
ft
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(
A picture of beauty and chaste refinement unapproached heretofore by
any manufacturer. Massive frame work, highly ornamented with expen
sive hand and machine work of the highest order. An organ that will
prove an ornament in the most finely furnished parlor in the country.
CASE. Made of the finest selected white oak or walnut, very heavy
and massive, securely framed, doweled, paneled, screwed and glued to
gether. Deep paneb, handsome carvings of beautiful designs, elaborate
turnings, mouldings and fret work in key slip, large French plate mirror in
top, 13x13, large closed music pocket with hinged front and safety lamp
stands, hand rubbed and polished.
ACTION. In this case we can place actions B, C, D, E, P, G, or II,
all of them pipe toned, sweet and melodious.
SIZE AND 1A7EIGHTV When set up for use this Organ, in
6 octaves, measures Si inches high, 52 inches long and 24 inches deep, Net
weight 325 lbs., gross weight (boxed) 450 lbs. When boxed for export the
five octave organ occupies 54 cubic feet of space and the six octave 56 cubic
feet. v-
EVERY ORGAN FULLY WARRANTED TEN YEARS.
ADDRESS
National Baptist Publishing Board,
523 Second Avenue, North, Nashville, Tenn.
TAKE
(UlliYS SAIISAPARILLA
The Only True Blood, Liver
and Kidney Remedy.
EXCELLENT SPRING T011IG,
Our Sarsaparillais made from
pure herb Roots and Drugs
which li a ve proved by long ex
perience to be the most valu
able in restoring and invigorat
ing. For renewing and enrich
ing the blood.
Every Buttle liiinriintccd To Give Satisfaction
or .Honey Uefiindod.
PRICE PER BOTTLE, 50 CEflTS.
All Telephone Orders Delivered.
DAVID .1. Kill', Druggist,
(Ydar Street and Twolflh Avenue, Xorth.
'Humes Mntii, 17 IS and WM.
W$ Willis Lockridge
MILLINERY, PIAIN AND FANCY SEWING.
OUDKItS TAKEN.
Call to see me; if you are pleased, tell
others; if not, tell tne.
)05 Eleventh Avenue, North.
ila tf
at Your Price,
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DESIGN No. 5.
SOLID OAK OB WALNUT.
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UV'Q
Dry Goods and Carpet Go,
Third Avenue, between Union Street
and Public Square.
Carry the Best Stock ol Carpets,
The Best Assortment ol Silks and
, Dress Goods,
The Handsomest Line o! Cloaks
and Suits.
6
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