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The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, May 03, 1907, Image 3

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THE NASHVILLE GLOBE, FRIDAY, MAY 3, 1307.
3
I
DANGEROUSLY ILL.
Ernest Howell, of Alabama, Suffering
With Tuberculosis in Davidson
County Jail.
To be Incarcerated in jail is bad
enousa; but when a man is there, and
failing health overtakes him the case
becomes pitiful. It looks to those
who have seen Ernest Howell that In
all probability ha will never recover.
The man Is from Alabama and Is now
confined in the jail under sentence of
death. His condition, appears criti
cal, as he is apparently In the last
stages of consumption, and In the
opinion of those who understand the
disease, he will never reach the scaf
fold. Howell was found guilty of the mur
der of Mr. Charles Rowland, the old
carpenter whose body was found some
months ago In the outskirts of the
city, near the Glendale car route, a
full account of the affair being pub
lished in The Globe at the time. It
was reported that his conviction was
brought about through the .confession
he made at the time of his arrest.
Howell is under indictment for the
perpetration of other crimes. 'He is
accused of committing an assault op. a
South Nashville men. Btefore com
ing to this city he was arrested in
Alabama on a charge of attempted as
sault, but broke jail and made his es
cape. Had he been apprehended, be
yond a doubt he would have been
taken charge of by a mpb of "best
citizens," and executed without trial
by judge or Jury.
Howell is a young man, probably
about 25 years of age. In case he
pulls through, as it looks now, there
is a chance that he will get his case
reversed before the Supreme Court.
His attorneys Messrs. Mayfield and
Ewing, are working hard in the
prisoner's behalf.
PEARL HIGH SCHOOL NOTES.
The Pearl Washintgonians met
more than their match in the baseball
game last' Saturday on Fisk Campus.
When the smoke of battle had cleared
away, the score board read: Fisk 18.
Pearl 5. Many reasons were assigned
for such an inglorious defeat and the
game has been played over again in
conversation and discussion in the
school yard. The High School fac
ulty have advised the boys to take
their medicine like heroes, to quit of
ferlng excuses and to quit criticising
those who made errors, and to work
the harder for victory next time.
The High School team has been
challenged for a game by the Turner
Normal and Industrial boys of Shelby-
ville.Tenn. If arrangements are per
fected, quite a crowd will accompany
the team to the capital city of Bedford
County.
Quite a radical change will take
place on the first floor of Pearl School
during the summer. Your reporter
has it from good authority that a par
tltion will be run through the hall, di
viding it into two unequal parts. 'The
larger part will be used as a hall for
the seventh and eighth grade pupils
from all over the city. The smaller
part will be used to enlarge the two
recitation rooms In the rear, which
will be converted into working rooms
for the Manual Training Department
Pearl High School will then be the
manual training center for Negro
children. All the high grades will be
centered here. This will of necessity
cause an almost complete change in
the teaching force of the first floor, as
It now stands. Primary teachers and
primary children must be provided
for elsewhere. The two new Negro
schools with proper transfers will in
all probability take care of both.
Something of a "breeze" was stirred
up among certain elements of the
teaching fraternity last week, because
their names were not given as deserv
ing special mention for meritorious
work. The Globe man's scalp was
in danger. Your reporter has tried
to be just and has recorded his opin
ion without fear or favor. It gives
him pleasure now to say that the
work exhibited this week showed
greater excellence than any previous
week; but among all the excellent
specimens, those of Miss Lizzie Fox
took the premium. She appears to
have splendid talent along the line of
, basket-making. Mr. J. E. Miller was
: a very close second. Next week the
ladies will take up sewing and the
, men mechanical drawing.
Mr. F. G. Smith, the principal
made a flying trip to Winchester
Tenn., last Saturday, where he was
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Trigg
Mrs. Trigg was formerly a member
earl High 'School and Prof. Smith re
ports that he was royally entertained
Dy ms tormer pupil.
WALDEN COMMENCEMENT.
The commencement exercises of
Walden University began Wednesday
; May 1, and will continue until Thurs
day , May 9. This has been a very sue
cessful year at the University, and the
President and faculty feel highly
elated over the success attained. The
classes in all departments have taken
ep interest in their studies and as
result good marks have been the
rule rather than the exception. The
attendance has been unusually large
and the work as a whole shows con
clusively that the young Negroes are
seekers after knowledge. Following
tne programme:
Wednesday, May 1, 7:30 p. m. Theo
logical Department Class Exercises.
Thursday, May 2, 7:30 p. m. Music
Department, Piano Recital, Gradu
ate Teachers' Course,
'riday, May 3, 7:30 p. m. Young
Men's Lyceum, Literary Society Ex
ercises. (Attendance bv invitation.)
Sunday, May 5, 10:30 a. m.Baccalau-
reate Sermon, Rev. H. M. DuBose,
D. D., Editor Epworth Era, M. E.
Church, South.
Sunday, May 5, 7:30 p. m. Annual
Sermon, Rev. Miles Williams, Mem
phis. Monday, May G, 3:00 p. m. Alumni
Business meeting.
Monday, May 6, 7:30 p. m. English
Department. Graduatina: Exercises.
Tuesday. May 7, 7:30 p. m. Normal
Department, Graduatine Exercises.
Wednesday, May 8, 10:00 a. m. Print
ing Department,' Graduating Exer
cises. Wednesday and Thursday, May 8 and
, I p. m. Annual Meeting, Board
of Trustees.
Wednesday, May 8, 7:30 p. m. Alum
ni Annual Addresses, Wm. E. New
som, President Wayman Academy,
Harrodsburg, Ky.; James F. Lane,
A. B., Professor Lane College, Jack
son, Tenn.
Thursday, May 9, 10:00 a. m. Com
mencement Exercises. Address, Rev.
Wm. F. Anderson, D. D., Secretary
Board of Education, Freedmen's Aid,
and Sunday School, New York City.
Presentation of Diplomas, etc.
Monday to Thursday, May 6 to May 9.
Lxhibit of work in Commercial,
Industrial and other Departments;
including Stenography, Type-writing
Map and other drawing, Mil
linery, Sewing, Printing, and Do
mestic Science in Library Building.
COLUMBIA NOTES.
Household of Ruth No. 95. G. U.
O. of O. F., gave an old-fashioned fes
tival (supper) April 26 for the benefit
or the Odd Fellows hall, which is in
course of erection. It was a financial
success.
urs. voornees and Lynch have a
branch office here and are prepared
to serve the people of Columbia with
all kinds of dental work.
The Shelbyville baseball team
played the "Columbia Cubs" at River
side Park Thursday and Friday, April
35 and 26. The Cubs were defeated
Prof. Graham, the new countv Su
perintendent of public schools, met
wiih the county teachers Saturday.
April 27. A very interesting meeting
was had. June 15.1s the date set for
the election of teachers.
Mrs. Mary McCarrell Pattern died
April 23 at the home of her mother
on East Tenth street. She had made
Chicago her home since her marriage
three years ago, and was visiting her
mother at the time of her death.
Mr. and Mrs. Willis Pointer are the
proud parents of a fine boy.
Mrs. Fannie Blair is at home, hav
ing closed her school at iKindvhook.
Prof. J. W. Johnson, principal of
the school at Martin West Tennessee
has closed his school and is at home
for an indefinite stay.
Mr. W. D. Kelly attended the clos
ing exercises of the Campbellsville
school, of which Miss Ella Hunt
is
teacher.
McMINNVILLE NOTES
The first Baptist Church, under the
management of its energetic young
pastor, uev. u. . l . speaks, closed a
very successful rally on Sunday night,
in which they raised the sum of $80
Interesting programs were rendered
on Thursday and Friday nights and on
baturday night a reception was given
in honor of the pastors of the citv
Sunday afternoon Rev. Trawlck, pas
tor of the M. E. Church, South, deliv
ered an be address to a large audi
ence, his subject being "The Here
after."
Rev. Wilhite, of Alabama, has been
in the city for several days attending
the rally of the Baptist church.
Mrs. Cora Crochett, of Nashville, is
here for a few weeks, teaching a large
class in millinery.
Mr. and Mrs. Firman Rivers, o
Hiastiand, nave been visiting relatives
here during the past week.
Miss 'Edna Grace Brown is suffer
ing from a severe attack of tonsiliti
The second quarterly meeting was
held at Clark Chapel M. E. Church
Sunday, Rev. W. R. Smith, presiding
elder, delivered able sermons at morn
ing and evening services
Miss Adele Johnson, who was ill for
a few days last week, is well again
Mrs. Eva Martin and Mr. Porter
LS!
home of the bride. Rev. G. T. Speak
performed the ceremony,
SHELBYVILLE NOTES.
Everything is in a stir about now,
looiung lorward to the commence-
ment at Turner Normal Institute, May
30. The Turner Normnl hncnhnll team
- J VIM V
has just returned from a trip to Co
urnbia, where t -ey ensraged the Co-
lumbia boys in a'Vo days' contest.
Victory for Tur.').V Normal. Our
boys are now champing their bits for
game with a certain Nashville team.
The Turner Normal . institutes have
Mrs. J. A. Jones i spending a few
days at her home, 922 MorrisoD street,
wasnvme. '
Prof. F. G. Smith paid our town a
visit recently, the guest of Dr. J. A.
Jones. His visit was in the interest
of
the colored department of the
amestown Exposition.
Mrs. M. E. Davis, instructor in
urner College, spent a few davs In
Nashville last week.
Rev. Mr. Thompson, the new nas-
tor of the M. E. Church, has arrived
and entered upon his work. He suc
ceeds Rev. H. H. Hinton. who was re
cently transferred to the Ohio Confer
ence.
Mrs. II. L. P. Jones, of Pulaski, was
visitor to our town last week.
It is reported that work will com
mence in the near future on the new
building of the Turner Normal Insti
tute. Dr. Jones the president, ex
presses hope that the next session will
open in the new building on the beau
tiful campus.
SAME OLD SKELETON IN THE
CLOSET.
One Gustaf Westfeldt, a member of
the Board of Administrators of Tn-
ane University, New Orleans. La-
writes to the British Ambassador at
Washington, D. C, attempting to
show that the awarding of the Cecil
Rhodes' scholarships to Negrroes will
make the scholarships unpopular in
the South.
There was a time when the white
man of the South said that the Negro
was Incapable of mastering the higher
branches of learning, but the master
ful achievements of the Negro in
every department of human knowl
edge has made him reverse this do
sition with reference to that old tale
entirely. He no longer says the Ne
gro cannot win his way in every
form of mental effort. It is now a
seriously debated question with him
Whether he can outstrip the Negro at
all Intellectually. The thoughts of
It are a bitter pill for the white man
to swallow, especially when he re
members all of his boasting of his
superiority. The winning of one of
the Cecil Rhodes scholarships bv Mr
Alian LeRoy Locke, of Philadelphia,
Fa., was due to his superior and schol
arly attainments. The awarding of
the prize was the work of white men.
who most certainly did not do so out
of any motive of favoritism. The
young man passed through' the cruci
ble of a competitive examination, and
came out with his colors flying. He
was not only a successful competitor
but stood second to none in the test
Mr. Locke is a Harvard man who
has done the remarkable thing of
making a four-year course in three
years. He Is young and brilliant,
with a remarkable capacity for Intel
lectual effort. He succeeded in tret
ting one of the Rhodes prizes on his
merits and merits alone.
Now to hear this little New Orleans
man begging the Britisher to deprive
the young man of his well-won prize
is pitiable Indeed. lie deserves com
miseration; for, like the drowning
man, he is catching at a straw.
Gustaf Westfeldt is a name that
shows that its possessor is either a
foreigner or of foreign extraction, and
that class Is the worst set in the world
tor it wishes to keen in with the na
tive American so as to divert his sus
piclon from itself.
Gus has found out since he has been
in this country to ficht the Neirro is
a winning card for a foreigner, so he
seizes this Rhodes scholarship bus!
ness to make his grandstand play to
the South, which will have to
saved from the anarchy of the West
feldt type by the prowess of the ever
true, loyal and patriotic Negro.
MURFREESBORO NOTES.
Mr. Joe Robertson and Miss Eliza
J. Bell were united in holv wedlock
on Wednesday night, April 24. at the
church near Murfressboro. The re
ception was at the home of the bride
parents. A host of friends from Mur
freesboro were present. Rev. Nea
Crutcher performed the ceremony
Many handsome presents were re
ceived. The newly-wedded couple
will make their future home in Nash
ville.
EBENEZER NOTES
The revival which was started last
Sunday after a week of prayer, has re
suited In a rich harvest. Rev. Dr
Flajnr. preached on Tuesday nicht
His sermon. has followed the people
ever since. His text was Psalm 119
59: "I thought on my way, and turned
my feet to thy testimonies
Mr. Robert Bender, the oldest mem
ber of Ebenezer Church, is very sick
at his home.
'Miss Jennie Rideout spent Sunday
with her mother.
THE VERDI SCHOOL OF MUSIC i
IS NOW OPEN.
Instructions and Lessons given in Piano, Organ,
Violin, Mandolin, Guitar, Voice and Harmony.
I NO. W EIGHTH AVENUE, N.,
MISS JOSEPHINE PRICE,
INSTRUCTOR.
TERMS OF 1906-1907.
J. IB. KENNEDY,,
LIVERY, BOARD
Fin Rigs of Every Description,
PHONE, Alain 4IS6,
440 THIRD AVENUE, NORTH,
LODGE DIRECTORY.
GRAND LODQB K. OF P.
Q. C.J. P. CRAWFORD.
706 Bass Street, Nashville. Tenn.
G. V. C. I. M. STEGALL,
Humboldt. Tenn.
P. G. C. J. H. LaFRADE,
Chattanooga, Tenn.
G. P. REV. T. J. TOWNSEND,
Box 148, Brownsville, Tenn.
G. M. or E. B. F. JOHNSON,
850 E. 8th Street, Chattanooga, Tenn.
G. L J. M. EASTERLING,
903 Georgia Ave., Chattanooga, Tenn.
G. K. R. S. DR. R. W. ALLEN,
124-126 E. fth St., Chattanooga, Tenn.
G. M. A. JOHN SINGLETON,
Knoiville, Tenn.
G. I. G. A. T. HILL,
Pulaski, Tenn.
G. M. R. E. GEE,
Nashville, Tenn.
G. O. G. A. W. GLE1AVES,
Nashville, Tenn.
O. Att'y. J. THOMAS TURNER.
Nashville. Tenn.
G. M. R. DR. A. M. TOWNSEND,
614 Webster St, Nashville, Tenn.
2-23-06-utf
ENDOWMENT BOARD: W. F. ReT'
nolds, Pres., w. L. Cansler, Sec'y,
B. F. Johnson, Treas., B. J. Fernandii,
DAMON LODGE, NO. 2, K. OF P.
Meets at the Pvthlan Temnle. r.or.
ner of Fifth and CaDltol avenues, the
second and fourth Wednesdays of each
month.
second and fourth Thursdays of each
month.
J. W. BLAINE, C. C.
W. L. CANSLER. K. of R. ft 8.
' NGER LODGEl NO. I.
Meet ai Burrus Hall, corner of
Cedar t d McLemore streets, second
and fourth Mondays of each month.
iiH. r . tx. BURRUS, C. C.
W A JAMES. JL. Of R. ft S.
S-16-06 utf
IVANHOE LODGL. NO. I.
Meets at the Pythian Temple, cor
ner of Fifth and Capitol avenues, the
J. F. IRONS, C. C.
J. E. MILLER, K. or and 8.
S-m-06 utf
TTREE LODGE. NO. 11.
Meets at the Pythian Temple, cor
ner of Fifth and Capitol avenues, the
first and third Wednesdays of each
month.
W H. ALLISON. C , C.
J. B SMIT1 K of R. ft 8
l-M-Od utf.
LIGHTFOOT LODGE, NO 11,
Meets at the Pythian Temple, corner
of Fifth and Capitol avenues, the first
and third Mondays of each month.
JOHN P. PORTER. C. C.
A. L. HADDOX, R. of R. and 8.
2-23-06-utt
PURITY LODG, NO. 42, K. OF P.,
Meets at the 'ythian Temple, corner
of Fifth and Capitol, avenues, second
and fourth Tuesdays of each month.
BAILEY TURNER, C. C.
W. M. ALLEN. K. of R. and 8.
3-2-06-utf
HARMONY LODGE, NO. 67, K. of P.
Meets at Benevolent Hall, corner E.
Hill and Factory street3, second and
fourth Tuesday nights of each month.
FRIENDSHIP LODGE, NO. 72, K.
OF P.
Meets at the Pythian Temple, corner
of Fifth and Capitol avenues, second
and fourth Mondays of each month.
DR, J. A. MCMILLAN, C. C.
THOMAS C MOORE, K. of R.
and S.
(North Spruce St.) f
J
$2.00 Per Month
and SALE STABLE
NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE.
J! in tf
Have You Catarrh?
Do Your Eyes Trouble You?
Do You Need Glasses? "
OR HAVE YOTJ ANY
TROUBLE "WITH YOUR
EYES, EARS, NOSE
or THROAT?
IF SO, CONSULT
Dr. G. V. Roman,
SPECIALIST,
ROOMS 2 and 3 NASHVILLE,
NAPIER COURT. TENN.
Dry Goods and Carpet Go.
Third Avenue, between Union Street
and Public Square.
Carry the Best Stock ol Carpets,
The Best Assortment ol Silks and
Dress Goods,
The Handsomest Line ol Cloaks
and Suits.
RUIIiVSTSmWRILLA
The Only True Blood, Liver
and Kidney Remedy.
EXCELLENT SPRIIiG TONIC.
Our Sarsaparillais made from
pure herb Roots and Drugs
which hare proved by long ex
perience to be the most valu
able in restoring and invigorat
ing. For renewing and enrich
ing the blood.
Every Bottle Guaranteed T Give Satisfaction
or Money Refunded.
PRICE PER DOTTLE, 50 CENTS.
ill Telephone Orderi Delirered.
DATID J. m Druggist,
Cedar Street aud Twelfth Avenue, North.
Thoaes Katn, 1718 nd 40;!0.
TIMOTHY'S
M.'Q7tr

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