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The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, May 10, 1907, Image 1

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"All things come to them that wait, providing they hustle while they wait." Charles TT. Anderson. "Get out of our sunshine." R. 27. Boyd.
Vol. II.
NASHVILLE. TENN.. FRIDAY. MAY 10. 1907.
No. 18.
TT T7TT
(GILO
5OVl
TWO DRUNKEN
WHITE ROWDIES
HELD FORTH ON LOCUST STREET
f-
ABOUT AN HOUR WEDNES
DAY MORNING.
POLICE HEADQUARTERS WERE
NOTIFIED BY PHONE AND .IN
PERSON "ARE THEY WHITE
MEN?" 'DISTURBERS OF THE
PEACE," WAS , THE REPLY
THAX WAS SIGNIFICANT AND
NO ARREST WAS MADe!
Two semi-drunken white rowdies
held forth for some considerable time
in Western style on Locust street, be
tween Second and Third avenues, Wed
nesday morning, May 8. The police
department was notified several times
by phone of the disorderly conduct of
the pseudo-desperadoes, but no officers
showed up; then a party went in per
son and reported the situation. The
officer at the police station to whom
the matter wa3 reported asked, "Are
they white men?" Being informed
that they were disturbers, he took it
for granted that they were white men
Imposing on Negroes only, and that
was not worth any consideration, as
must be Judged from the fact that no
officer ever came, the rowdies, seeing
that their fun and bullyism were 'not
ikely to be interfered with by the po
lice, continued to terrorize the street.
Finally they carried the thing too far
and interferred with a colored youth
t?ome years the Junior of the rowdies.
Another colored youth came to the as
sistance of the first and the two col
bred youths opened up an artillery of
Stones on the two white bullies, in
cluding them, and so hot and rapid
were the fire that the bullies were not
allowed to retreat in order; no, they
stood not on the order of going, but
fled precipitately toward Third ave
nue. As they "skidooed" before- that
fchower of rapid Are artillery worked
by the lada, everybody along the street,
colored and white, gave the- fleeing
rowdies the horse laugh.
For nearly an hour the rowcllei stag
gered about the street brandishing
their weapons and threatening peacea
ble and law-abiding citizens; one had
an opened knife and the other a pint
bottle loaded With ''busshead" whis
key, which he ever and anon motioned
In a manner as if he were going to
throw it at some one who happened to
inspire his displeasure.
Many people were attracted by the
antics of these two would be toughs,
and they fcraned their heads and
peer?4 in every direction to see some
whcer heave into sight, coming to take
the semi-inebriates in tow. But, alas!
no officer came, and- the Job of ridding
the vicinity of the presence of the bul
lies was left to the two colored lads
who did it thoroughly.
. The Vulgar conduct of the two bul
lies attempted on the premises of a re
jnilable and respectable citizen and the
belligerent attitude assumed by them
when remonstrated with and put off,
were reported at police station, both
by phone and In person, but were ig
nored. Were these men stool pigeons?
Were they playing an inspired role or
"game?" Were theirs the minor part
of a deeper drama? One thing stood
out as singular in the whole affair and
was witnessed by every looker-on, and
that was this the men who had all along
pretended to be reeling drunk, ran as
steadily as men could have run when
the lads got too hot for their longer
larry
Every Mass and condition of orderly
cimer.'d that have confidence in and
on the proper authorities for pro
tection against rowdyism should have
it when they ask for it, without that
protection or non-protection being
predicated upon the color of the perpe
trator. When a complaint is made
against a disturber of the peace, what
has "Is he white or black" to do with
the nature or quality of the complaint
or crime?
' PEARL HIGH SCHOOL NOTES.
That was a fine . compliment paid
this school by Mrs. D. J. Jarrett In the
Evening Banner of last Monday. Mrs.
Jarrett is the Chairman of the W. C.
T. U. organization of Davidson County
and the editor of the W. C. T. U. col
umn In the Nashville Banner. In com
pany with Mrs. Helen D. Harford, a
woman of national reputation and a
noted speaker In the Temperance
cause, these two estimable women vis
ited our school last Monday. Mrs.
Harford made an eloquent address to
the students In which she appealed to
them to avoid whisky and tobacco in
every form. The quotation from the
Banner Is as follows: "This school for
the Negro population of the city is sure
ly deserving of much praise. As the vis
itors were invited in and seated on the
platform of the second floor, there was
a manner and air of politeness about
the entire school that was noticeable.
They greeted ua with the song 'Old
Kentucky Home,' and the melody -so
filled the heart as to bring tears to the
eye." This testimony In regard to po
liteness ia in direct contrast to the
preachments of a gdod many Southern
statesmen'!?), that education tends to
make the Negro insolent.
Dr. F. G. Smith, the principal, has
accepted an invitation to deliver the
annual address to the graduating class
of the Colored High School of Colum
bia, Tenn., on Friday night, May 24.
He will speak on the subject, "Educa
tion as related to Success and Pros
perity." Prof. W. E. Newsom, principal of
Wayman Institute at Harrodsburg,
Ky., visited the school on Wednesday.
The teachers have entered upon
their last course of manual training
instruction, and will complete the
work for this year in three more les
sons. The lady teachers are now tak
ing sewing under Miss Elizabeth Ran
dais, and the male teachers have had
their first lesson in mechanical draw
ing, under Mr. Eugene Gillihan. The
work has proved very helpful, but the
work has been so taxing and the
weather so unfit for the best effort,
that teacherB will give & sigh Of relief
when it is ail over.
BAPTIST SUNDAY SCHOOLS TO
CELEBRATE CHILDREN'S DAY.
Efforts are now being out on foot to
bring the twenty-five Baptist churches
in Nashville all of which have an or
ganized Sunday school at their
churches, together in ono grand rally
on Children's Day, which has been sot
for the second Sunday in June, which
is June 9. A Globe representative in
speaking to one of the prompters of
this undertaking, learned that it is
their plan to have the celebration of
Children's Day at beautiful Green
wood Park. The Sunday school su
perintendents of every Baptist Sun
day school in the city have been
urged to meet in the chapel of the
National Baptist Publishing Board.
Sunday afternoooa at 2 o'clock, May
12. At this meetings pians will be
laid out for the celebration. Each Sun
day school will be urged to charter a
special car and go out to Greenwood
under its own banner. Children's
Day is celebrated by all denomina
outward noise that the other denom
tlons.but the Baptists nave made more
inations recently, and they propose
this year to demonstrate their
strength. Fully 5,000 children are ex
pected to march under the various
banners from the car line to Green
wood Park. A magnificent banner
will be presented by the Publishing
Board to the Sunday School having
the best report. The movement will
be organized into a kind of city unicn
movement and vigorously pushed un
til the second Sunday in June. It is
learned that Mr. Henry A. Boyd, who
is the assistant secretary of the Na
tional Baptist Publishing Board, is at
the head of the movement. He has
issued a call for a meeting of Sunday
school superintendents.
DISTINGUISHED VISITORS.
Messrs. -Nace Dixon, W. H. Keesee,
V. S. Dabney, of Clarksville, Tenn.;
II. N. O. Terry, of Florence, Ala.; C.
L. Crowder, of Lebanon, Tenn.; J. O.
Chafin, of Hopkins ville, Ky.; and D.
L. White, of Pulaski, Tenn., were vis
itors in the city in the attendance oi
the Funeral Directors' and Embalm
ers' Association of Tennesse, which
held its meeting at the National Cask
et Company Building and the Cham
ber of Commerce. The Association
began its session May 7, lasting
through May 10.
These gentlemen were the guests of
Elder Preston Taylor last Thursday
evening and after the meeting ad
journed he carried them out for a
drive for the remainder of the day to
Greenwood Park and Greenwood Cem
etery, where each gentleman ex
pressed himself as being delighted ir.
seeing such beautiful places, though
in despite of the rain thtry were high
ly pleased with their visit to the Cem
etery and Tark as well as the long
drive. Elder Taylor invited the gen
tlemen to make us a .special visit to
Nashvillo later on in the summer
when the Park will be in full bloom.
MAGNIFICENT
SPRING FESTIVAL
HE1D AT MT. OilVE. MAY 6-10.
VAST NUMBER OF PEOPLE
ATTENDED.
DECORATIONS OF THE MANY
BOOTHS AS WELL AS THE
LARGE AUDITORIUM WERE
BEAUTIFUL RARE THINGS ON
EXHIBITION SUPPLY OF EAT
ABLES WAS EXHAUSTED EACH
NIGHT.
For twenty years, or in other words,
since the organization of Mt. Olive
Baptist Church in 1887, it has been
the custom to have during the month
of May, a spring festival. This has
been kept up regularly without ceas
ing. The church under the former
pastor commemorated these customs,
and for the past thirteen years, since
Dr. Clark has been pastor, they have
been kept up with the same regular
ity. The festival this year is under
the able management of Mr. William
Young, who is an ardent worker In
the church identifying himself with
every movement that will in any way
benefit the church spiritually or fi
nancially. He organized the church
into a working committee of 150 and
subdivided this committee into va
rious other committees. The opening
of the festival Monday night was un
der the most promising circum
stances. The weather was beautiful
and hundreds of friends and members
took advantage to be present. The
basement or the Sunday school room
was converted into a spacious hall.
All of the seats were removed and
over twenty booths were built. These
were beautifully decorated and had
attending them proficient workers.
The festival opened with a special
program. The chorus "Awake, O,
Zion," was participated in by the two
choirs (senior and junior) consisting
of fifty voices. Prayer was offered by
Dr. C. TI. Clark; an oration, "Home,
Sweet Home," by A. C. Sloan; violin
solo by Harrison Drake; closing song
by the combined choirs, with merri
ment and fun throughout the evening,
marked the first night's proceedings.
The attendance was between 25.0 and
300.
The second night of the spring fes
tival proved as attractive to the
masses as did the opening night. The
crowds came from all parts of the
city. Every booth in the church wras
well patronized. One of the most
unique booths in the festival was that
of the Globe Publishing Company. It
is said to be one of the first instances
in the history of a spring festival
where a newspaper is enterprising
enough to be represented where the
people could know and see for them
selves that the weekly journals have
an interest in their doings. There was
no special program on the second
night, but the entire evening was
given over to making new friends and
greeting old ones. Eatables of all
kinds were to be had at the tables.
The novelty, tinware and soft drink
counters were liberally patronized.
The register of names of visitors t
the festival continued vith success
It is estimated that over 400 people
passed in the door on the second
night.
(Continued on Page Four.)
CALL FOR SUNDAY SCHOOL SU
PERINTENDENTS. The superintendents of all Sunday
schools in the city of Nashville are re
spectfully urged to meet in the chapel
of the National Baptist Publishing
Board, corner North Market and Lo
cust streets, on Sunday at 3 p. m.,
May 12, for the purpose of consider
ing plans to celebrate in union Chil
dren's Day, which is the second Sun
day in June, being the 9th day. Su
perintendents who cannot attend will
please send a representative to this
meeting.
HENRY A. BOYD,
Assistant Secretary Publishing Board.
NEGRO INVENTS' BUTTING POST,
Special to the Globe.
Dickson Tenn. The town of Dick
son has an inventor, Henry Gray by
name, who promises great achieve
ments in the inventive field. Mr. Gray
is an employe of the N. C. & St. L.
Railroad at this place and for a year
or more he has been at work carrying
his invention of a car stop, or butting
post, for use of railroads in stopping
cars at the end of sidetracks, etc., to
completion. The mold has been submit
ted to a number of expert railroad men
and all pronounced it the most avail
able thing of the kind they have ever
seen. It is constructed of wood and
iron, and will resist the heaviest force
that can possibly be put against it.
having a resisting power of many tons
weight. A patent has been applied
for.
The Negro is taking his place by
the side of the leading inventors of
the times, and is learning to reap the
benefits from his genius.
The following special to one of the
daily papers, says in relation to the
matter: "Henry Cray, the colored in
ventor of Dickson, who has invented
a railway butting post, mention of
which was recently made in the Ban
ner, has been offered a handsome lit
tle fortune for his invention, but so
far has accepted no offer, preferring to
patent the machine and then risk it
upon its merits. This Is truly a won
derful invention, and yet so simple in
onstruction that after seeing it every
one is constrained to ask why he him
self had not thought of it. The ap
pliance, which is claimed to stop cars
at the terminus of railroad tracks, or
wherever a car-stop is needed, has a
resisting power of hundreds of tons.
ind yet its recoil is so complete that
with whatever force a car may be
thrown against it, the latter stands
no chance of injury. It is estimated
that its economical saving to a line of
road in one year would be thousands
of dollars in the protection of cars."
L. & N. WILL HONOR A WORTHY
MAN.
A barbecue is being planned by the
local officials of the Louisville & Nash
ville Railroad in honor of Mr. Matt
White a faithful and efficient employe
of the road, who will round out his
half century of service with that com
pany on June 8. Mr. R. H. Bransford,
Soliciting Agent of the L. & N., is
Chairman of the Committee on Ar
rangements, and will be assisted by
Messrs. Lee Baskette, of the Cumber
land Gap Despatch, and S. M. Price.
Addresses will probably be made by
Maj. James Geddes, Maj. E. B. Stahl
man, Maj. E. C. Lewis and Mr. C. H.
Sanders of this city and Mr. W. II.
Tinsley, of Louisville. The Fisk Glee
Club will probably sing some old-
fashioned songs, and altogether the
day will be one long to be remem
bered by faithful Mr. White, who has
nursed the L. & N. from its birth un
til the present time, having been a
member of the first track laying gang
that left Nashville. Invitations will
be issued from the local office to all
the officers and old employes of the
company, and arrangements are being
made for one of the largest gather
ings of L. & N. railroad men that has
been seen in Nashville for some time.
Mr. White has served under the fol
lowing local agents: Messrs. John S
Bransford, E. B. Stahlman, C. II. San
ders, W. T. Peyton and C. W. Toliver,
the present agent, in whose adminis
tration & is a very important em
ploye. He accepted service under Maj.
Geddes in June, 1857, at which time
Maj. Geddes, now Assistant General
Manager of the L. & N., was a civil
engineer in charge of construction.
He has proved one among the many
faithful, honest, upright and truthful
employes of the road, and looks for
ward with a great deal of pleasure to
the barbecue that is being planned for
him at Watkins Park on June 8.
Mr. White said to a Globe represen-
atlve that he had seen several men
rise from humble to the highest In
the railroad service, but he had never
gotten higher than the top of a box
car. But despite this he has been
true to( every trust and well merits
every honor that can be shown him.
TENNESSEE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
NOTES.
The boys have been quite busy for
the last week, breaking rock.
George Morris, our cook, was made
happy by a visit from his father from
Chattanooga.
We greatly enjoyed a visit last
week from Miss Maggie Ilamm, of An
tioch, Mrs. Pay ton's sister. II. How
lett, of Clarksville, paid us a visit this
week, also Dr. H. T. Noel and wife.
Our pastor, Rev. Mr. Lusk, opened
the doors of the church Sunday and
twentv-five of the children joined.
Miss Annie Peyton, the matron of
the girls' department, was glad to see
Mrs. Amanda Frierson and daughter
I.ula this week.
Mr. and J. B. Peyton, both say the
Globe is a great paper. All the boys
Hike it very much.
GRANDEST COM
MENCEMENT
EVER AT WAtDEN UNIVERSITY
WAS HELD DURING PRES'
ENT WEEK.
FROM THE BACCALAUREATE?
SERMON TO THE CLOSING COL
LEGE EXERCISES THURSDAY
MORNING, EVERY PROGRAMME
WAS CARRIED OUT IN A MAN
NER WHICH WAS PRAISEWOR
THY AND COMMENDABLE.
The season for the closing of schools,
'hich is looked forward t(i with potrcr.
ness filled with exoectatimia hv tho
sweet girl graduate, the ambitious
young men, dreaming of how they will
outstrip Plato, Cicero and Demos
thenes on the platform, and parents
happy over the prospects of how their
children will aDuear on the utaco roav
- MW0 IVlfcUJ
for life s turmoil and battle, has
come; ana rrom now on until the mid
dle of June there will be held in ranld
succession one commencement exercise
after another.
The forty-first annual mmmonn.
ment exercise of the literary, theologic
al and industrial denartment nt wi.
den University was held under favor-
aoie circumstances. The Baccalaure
ate sermon on Sundav mnrUprt tho
opening. The entire week up to Thurs
day nas been spent in profitable and
enjoyable exercises. ; , :;
The graduating exercises nf tha ew.
lish department took place on Monday,
May C, 7:30 n. m.. in the Meharrv An.
ditorium. A larger crowd than usual
was present. The program was as fol
lows :
Processional March was played by
Prof. E. D. Johnson.
Chorus "Day by Day". ....... .Fearis
uigntn uraue Singing Class
Invocation
Chorus "Over the Meadow". . .Fearis
fetir Keiiance Georgia E. Johnson
Demand of the Time..Cassie B. Rattlp
Our Wars J. Chester Bolton
value or Hope ....Mattie W. E. Snead
Piano Quartette Festival March...;
. Rathbum
PIANO CERTIFICATE CLASS.
To Be Something James B. Harris
True Womanhood. .Minnie B. Sawyers
Maite Haste Slowly
Matilda A. L. Pvles
Recitation -Selling the Farm...
Hattie E. Flovd
Duet Summer Breezes ...,Denza
Sophronia D. Mayberry,
Mary E. Albritton.
Cheerfulness and Success
Daisy L. Killensworth
Recitation The Tyrol Maid
Lillian B. Lanslev
Value of Higher Education
Mary L. Porter
Violin Solo '"Ever So Fair" Waltz
Bowman
Matthew G. Thornton.
Reach the Goal. ...... .T. Blaine New
Our Homes Elvira Chapman
Christian Manhood. . .Harry Thornton
Trio The Dew Mlnard
Addie L. Buchanan, Susie Lee-
Dobson, Bertha, R. Travis, LueUa ,
A. Waddy, Fannie Duncan, Sam
ella V. McNeil. ...;.,
NORMAL CLASS CRADUATIXO EXERCISES.
On Tuesday night, May 7, at 7:30 p.
ni., the Normal Class of Walden Uni
versity was presented to the public.
The exercises took place in the Mehar
ry Auditorium. By 7:30 every avail
aide seat in the auditorium was taken
ind by 8 o'clock chairs filled all the
aisles. By the time the processional
march was played, standing room was
i thing of the past.- After the march,
President Kumler offered a fervent
tayer. A piano duet. "Sakontola".!by
Bendel was gracefully ' rendered ; by
Misses Beatrice Stewart and Lela Por
ter. The salutatory address, ."The Ne
gro in Literature," by Miss .Johnnie
Marie Denny, was given close atten
tion: She is an excellent speaker, and
had a voice suitable for the occasion.
The oration, "The Patriotism of
IVace," by John Howard McMorrls,
was the treat of the evening. He
showed exceptional oratorical powers,
rendering his piece in a most pleasing
manner. He captured the audience,
which showed its high regard by the

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