OCR Interpretation


The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, June 14, 1907, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Tennessee

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86064259/1907-06-14/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

.THE NASHVILL Tu ClfTlV mini
iTv '
An -a
.1
JLLi
"All things come to them that wait, providing they hustle while they wait." CftarJes Tv Inderson. "Get out of our sunshine." R. H. Boyd.
Vol. II.-
NASHVILLE. TENN., FRIDAY. JUNE 14. 1907.
No. 23.
j; FORTY-SECOND
ITTING PROGRAM
OBSERVED
COMMENCEMENT
Vcsj JLL xs. JJLJJJJLdo
hoii
10 Ce'
f; Fisk University Closes Most Suc
cessful Years Work.
LARjEST CROWDS ATTEND THAT WERE
' EVER SEEN IN THE CHAPEL.
CLOSING EXERCISES HELD ON
WEDNESDAY MORNING SEV
ENTEEN GRADUATES IN NOR
MAL jCLASS, SIXTEEN IN COL
LEGE CLASS THREE RECEIVE
DIP JVIAS FROM DEPARTMENT
clltl.i JSIC AND TWO FROM THE--
OLOGICAL PRESIDENT M E R-
RILL SPEAKS ENCOURAGING
WORDS TO CANDIDATES.
On Wednesday morning at ten
; o'clock the closing exercises of the
, torty-second annual commencement
, were held in the Memorial chapel un
'i der more glowing prosperity than has
.( over been witnessed in the history of
s the institution.
The co aimencement becan on Frl
.lay nip-"' ' June 7, with the exhibition
iiior Preparatory class, and
mere over the entire thirty
tampus was pregnated with
perfume of graduation days
Merrill stated that the at
lad been larger at these ex-
feises than at any previous com
oencement in the history of the
chool.
The children's cantata, "The Carni
aL of Flowers," was held in the gym
Fisk university Tuesday
m. The room was carpeted
..a cut white clover and' blue
'inches of hackberrY were
peer so as to just touch the floor
tation of trees, . in the centre
, raised dias surrounded by
of ox-eye daises, all giving a
oody setting for the carnival
-and choruses and marching oc
the hour to the great delight of
dience.
lay -night the normal class
&
out a packed house. The
was beautifully decoratec
alms and ferns. The young
iwere tastefully dressed in sim
te gowns with little trimming.
' COMMENCEMENT DAY,
- b hurry and bustle an air of
mt seemed to occupy everyone
uditorium was rapidly filled at
zk Wednesday to witness the
Df the anniversary week, the
on of the college class of '07.
Uie sixteen members of the
esented orations, the selections
'been made on account of su-
cholarship and excellent rec
l departments.
Sgramme of speakers follows:
ivlot.to. "Ouanti Est Sanere!"
4 "olo, Triumphal March, Miss
(Buck); prayer; Jubilee
rM.il.. "PUi'oncWin in
;ed States," Brown Wesley
uffalo Gap, Va.; "Gen. Clin
e Fisk," Jasper Tappan Phil
hville; piano solo, Etude, Op.
ill, It. W. Tibbs (Chopin);
f ijsm," Edith Wallace Law
Charleston, S. C; "Law as a
Elective," George Thomas
M, Louisville, Ky.; "Song oi
Miss M. V. Peake (Thorn-
-'conciled," Pratt Thomas,
Va.; "Working Women in
d States," Mary Matilda
I as Vegas, N. M.; Impromp-
'. two pianos, Miss Ross and
In
(Schuett); address. "The
the School," John Faville,
-ria, 111.; Pilgrims' Chorus.
r, Fisk Glee Club (Wag
oning of diplomas; Halle
us, from "The Messiah,"
iety (Handel); excused
Goo
.ng, Florence Kitty Ross;
ou.i Favill, Peoria, 111., deliv
i commencement address to the
lie took as his subject "Mis
' . the School."
I ' CANDIDATES I'OK DIPLOMAS.
Diplomas, degrees and honors were
awarded as follows:
Theological Diploma George Web
ler Havnes. Kirksville. Ky.; Cora Ad
) Tair, Raleigh, N. C.
misville, Ky.; Minnie Deig
leston, S. C; Thomas Pat
son, Jackson; Mary Matil
i, Las Vegas, N. M.; Flor
rude Jackson, Pensacola,
i Wallace Lawrence, Charles-
i
MR. GEORGE OLSBORN BOYD.
ton, S. C; Henry Raymond Merry,
Clarksvillc; Horace Franklin Mitch
ell, Lake Providence, La.; George
Thomas Overstreet, Louisville, Ky.;
Brown Wesley Payne, Buffalo Gap,
Va.; Jasper Tappan Phillips, Nash
ville; Florence Kitty Christine Ross,
Greenville, Texas; Pratt Thomas,
Chatam, Va.; Arthur Reid Ware,
Staunton, Va.
Bachelor of Science William An
nuel House, Murfreesboro; Martha
Iona Smith, LQxington, Ky.
Graduates from the Music Depart
ment Lizzie Juila Dean Allen, Roy
Wilfred Tibbs, Addie Lucile Robinson.
Honorary Normal Diplomas John
C.'Flournoy, Tuskegee, Ala.
Master of Arts M. Walter Dyson,
B. A., Fisk, '03, Yale, '05.
Honors Magna Cum Laude Col
lege Horace Franklin Mitchell, Geo.
Thomas Overstreet, Florence Kitty
Ross.
Magna Cum Laude Normal Flos
sie Adele Davis, Velma Pearl Hardee,
Zela Maud Herman, Sophie Matilda
Oversreet, Miranda Penelope Winter.
Cum Laude College Minnie Deig
:an, Mary Matilda Houston, Brown
Wesley Payne, Matilda Iona Smith.
BISHOP TYREE RETURNS HOME.
Bishop E. Tyree, of 15 North Hill
street, thcr csident Bishop of the
African Methodist Episcopal Church,
returned to the city Thursday night,
after an extended tour of his dis
trict, which comprises the state of
Texas, Oklahoma and Indian Territo
ries. While in the district the Bish
op held his annual spring rally for ed
ucation, for the fostering of Paul
Quinn College at Waco, Tex., and the
sum of $4,800 was raised. The spring
weather in the Southwest has been
ibout the same as was experienced in
this section, and it is believed that
"lad the weather been more favorable
the amount of $5,000, which the Bish
op had planned to raise, would have
')cen almost doubled.
Rev. A. Gordon, of Houston, Tex.,
ind a presiding elder in one of the
Texas Conferences, accompanied Bish
op Tyree to Nashville. Rev. Gordon
will preach at St. PaPul A. M. E.
Church Sunday morning at eleven
will preach r.t St. Paul A. M. E.
'Jhurch Sunday nightat eight o'clock.
Rev. Gordon is one of the ablest men
in his church and is ' an excellent
Mulpit orator. Bishop Tyree will od
hurch Sunday night at eight o'clock.
He Avill leave Monday morning at
seven o'clock for Wilberforee, Ohio,
to attend the summer session of the
Bishops' Council.
APPROAC. iING NUPTIALS.
Invitations are out announcing the
uarriage of Mr. John 11. Kelly. Jr..
who is connected with the National
!3aptist Publishing House, to Miss
nnie Maibelle Winfrey, of Little
Rock., Ark. The wedding will be
solemnized Wednesday, June 20, in
'he Congregational Church of Little
Rock, Ark.
PACE MARTIN WEDDING.
Miss Lillhn E. Ma-tin. of 407
Eighth avenue. North, and Dr. Will
iam S. Pace, class' '07, Meharry, were
married Thursday evening, June 0,
Rev. T. W. Johnson performing the
ceremony. It was a quiet homo wed
ding, witnessed only by relatives and
a few friends. A number of nice and
valuable presents were received. A
menu of two, courses was f
MRS.
MAGNIFICENTLY
BRILLIANT
Were the Boyd-Tate Nuptials,
Wednesday Evening.
PARLORS PROFUSELY DECORATED WITH
PALMS, FERNS AND CUT FLOWERS.
SCENE AT THE HOME OF MR.
AND MRS. WILLIAM O. TATE
WAS ONE OF ANIMATED PLEAS
URE AND JOY, AS THE GUESTS,
MEN AND WOMEN, VIED WITH
EACH OTHER IN MAKING THE
OCCASION A JOYOUS ONE
LOVELY DRESSED WOMEN
WITH THEIR SPARKLING GEMS
MADE A CHARMING PICTURE.
Mr. George O. Boyd and Miss Anna
Marie Tate, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
William O. Tate, were married at the
home of the bride's parents, 320 Eigh
th avenue, North, at 7:30 o'clock Wed
nesday evening, June 12. Rev. W. S.
Ellington, the popular clergyman and
pastor of the First Baptist Church,
officiated.
About G o'clock the guests began to
arrive and at 7 o'clock the brilliantly
lighted and pretty parlors, beautifully
decorated with palms, ferns and cut
flowers, presented one bright scene of
animation and joy richly begowned
ladies, matron and maid, wearing
fine and costly jewelry, sparkling
gems that, dazzled the eye, chatting
and full of life, made indeed a beau
tiful ptcture.
At the appointed hour Miss Ruth
P. McKinney began playing Mendels
sohn's wedding march and the ribbon
bearers Misses Palladium Compton,
Etta Mai Cheatham, Cornelia Young
and .Ellena Compton entered, followed
by the family, afterwhich came the
groom and his best man, Mr. J. Frank
Battle. Miss Maggie West, who was
the only bridesmaid, entered alone fol
lowed by the bride leaning on the arm
of her father, Mr. William O. Tate.
When the two young people took
their places under the beautiful wed
ding bell, they were surrounded by
friends, who were intensely interested
in seeing their matrimonial bark
launched upon the sea of wedded bliss
by Rev. Islington, who pronounced
I lie sacred, yet joyous ceremony.
The bride presented a lov ly pic
ture in a gown of white satin chiffon
over white silk, trimmed with bands
of satin ribbon and lace. She wore a
tulle veil which was caught up with
a diamond brooch and carried a bunch
of bride's roses and fern.
Miss Maggie West wore a lovely
creation of white organdy, lace and
tucks with a pink satin girdle. She
carried a bouquet, of American beauty
roses. r. .
Tho ribbon bearers. Misses Ellena
Compton in pink organd- and Etta
Mat Cheatham in pink . mulle, Cor
nelia Young and iv urn Compton
. i i
si
ANNA MARIE BOYD.
in white organdy presented u scene of
rare beauty.
The entire arrangement of this beau
tiful wedding was under the direction
of Mr. Lovell Landers, who merited
much praise for the successful man
ner in which he carried out every de
tail. He was as signally happy in his
conduction of this his latest effort as
in the J. Blaine Boyd and Clemmons
nuptial.
In the receiving party were Mes
dames Wm. O. Tate, Preston Taylor
Florence Kemp; N. J. Anderson, R. P,
Moore, Callie McGann, A. B. Carter
H. T. Noel and Miss Quinetta Comp
ton. Frappe was served by Miss John
D. Thompson. Light refreshments
were also served. Mr. and Mrs. Boyd
were the receipients of many congratu
latory telegrams and letters. They
were also the recipients of many valu
able, costly, rare and pretty presents
among which were quilts, household
furniture, silver, cut glass, and many
things wise and otherwise.
Mr. George O. Boyd is a native of
San Antonio, Texas, where he was
reared and received his early train
ing, both educationally and as a prln
ter. From his native home he went
forth into the larger field of the world's
busy activities, winning his way
steadily upward in his chosen profes
sion. Resigning the head of the Print
ing Department of Guadaloupe College,
Seguln, Texas, he came to Nashville,
where he is now connected with the
National Baptist Publishing House,
as one of its expert linotype opera
tors. He is one of the most rapid and
accurate operators of the linotype ma
chine, that wonderful invention of the
printers' art almost humanlike in its
workings in this country. Mr. Boyd
has also other business connections in
the city. He is the senior partner
in the livery business of Boyd & Bat
tle. He is a young man of promise
businesslike and alert, which traits are
indicative of success.
This was one of the prettiest wed
dings ever seen in Nashville, and if
the smiling faces and hearty congrat
ulations of their many friends augur
anything, then the young voyagers
may put forth upon the unknown sea
with happy hearts and high hopes, be
lieving they will be able to stem the
currents and sail securely before ad
verse winds and at last enter safely
the haven of their hopes. He who
is now destined to pilot the way of
her to whom he has plighted his faith,
his life and his sacred honor, has in
him all of the elements out of which
are made skillful seamen, and it is
predicted that he wil make the voy
age over life's tempestuous sea in
safety, shunning with a mariner's eye
the breakers on which he has seen
many a vessel, for the lack of a steady
pilot with a courageous heart and
dear mind, go down. Let them ever
be true to each other and hopeful of
the future, for they went forth Wed
nesday evening under the blessings
and benedictions of a host of friends,
young and ohL
NEG . 0 POET.
Prof, E. S. Brown, the poet, was in
the city last week the guest of Miss
Mary Work. Prof. Brown gave a re
cital at I ea Avenue Christian Church
last Tuesday evening under the au
spices of the Colored Y. M. C. A. He
also recited at the musical at Spruce
Street. Baptist Church given by Prof.
Towler. Prof. Brown loft Thursday
lor Washington, Baltimore and
town to fill an engagement. He will
enter Howard University in the fal1
hildren's Day at Greenwood
Park Sunday Evening.
SHORT TALKS BY PASTORS, SUPER.
INTENDENTS AND OTHERS.
MANY OF THE LARGE NUMBER
OF BAPTIST SUNDAY SCHOOLS
OF THE CITY WERE REPRE
SENTEDBY PASTORS, SUPERIN
TENDENTS, AND PUPILS THIS
FIRST ATTEMPT TO HAVE ALL
THE SCHOOLS UNITE IN THEIR
OBSERVANCE OF CHILDREN'S
DAY IS DUE TO THE EFFORT
; OF REV. HENRY A. BOYD.
The first Union Children's Day in
the history of ' Nashville was cele
brated at beautiful Greenwood Park
Sunday afternoon. Although the pro
gram was not to begin until 2:30 p.
m., the people began o go out to the
park about noon, and by three o'clock
it is estimated that fully 2,000 men,
women and children were on the
ground, and still the crowds came
some walking, some in private con
veyances and many hundreds on the
cars. Scores of wagons lined the pike,
carrying the school children from the
end of the car line to the park. Al
though the day was a hot one, hun
dreds of children found the shades
and spacious grounds at the park a
pleasant retreat. They were refreshed
by the cool and sparkling waters from
the springs. They took an outing that
will be long remembered. The pro
pram prepared did not begin until
3:30 owing to the constant stream of
people that continued to come.
! At 3:30 Mr. Henry Allen Boyd, the
general superintendent and manager
of the first Union Children's Day, an
nounced that the program was about
to be rendered. The exercises took
place in the spacious auditorium at
the park. This building is well
adapted for such exercises, having a
large stage and an inclined floor that
pffers a superior dncoemfent ovfeA
other auditoriums, and equaling that
pf the Union Gospel Tabernacle. The
burpose of this union meeting, as out
lined by Mr. Boyd, was for bringing
together in Nashville each year the
thousands of Sunday school pupils and
workers who never get together, but
Who are working in one good cause.
Such a religious exercise is calculated -to
do much good in a city like Nash
Yille. The program began with the open
ing chorus, in which all the , Sunday
schools present participated. Miss
Georgia A. Bradford presided at the
piano until the arrival of Miss Ruth
Pearl McKinney, who was to conduct
the music. Prof. L. S. Gray con
ducted the song service. The familiar
airs that were sung attracted the at
tention of hundreds in the park, and
soon a representative audience filled
the auditorium. Rev. James Slaugh
ter, pastor of Mt. Nebo Baptist Church,
led- in prayer. Then another soul-stirring
song, from Celestial Showers, No.
2, a production of the late Prof. Wm.
Rosborough was sung. "Our First
Union Children's Day in Nashville,"
was the first subject discussed. Those
paricipating in this were Rev. James
Slaughter, of Mt. Nebo, Rev. E. M.
Merritt, of Mt. Bethel Baptist Church,
of East Nashville; Mr. James Hurt,
superintendent of Mt. Olive Sunday
School, and Mr. J. P. Porter, superin
tendent of the Spruce Street Baptist
Sunday School. This discussion brought
out very clearly the need of the Sun
day school children and workers com
ing together at least once a year. Mr.
J. Blaine Boyd sang a solo, "The In
vitation," from the Harp of Zion and
B. Y. P. U. Hymnal, by Sherwood, who
was one of the best song writers of his
day. "The Need of a Children's Day"
was discussed by Rev. G. B. Taylor,
pastor of the Second Baptist Church,
and Mr. Tage, superintendent of the
Mt. Nebo Sunday School. A solo, "Our
Country Heroes," was sung by little
Katie Albertine Boyd.
At this point, Mr. J. D. Crenshaw
delivered an able address on "Children
as Church Workers." Mr. Crenshaw
is to-day one of the bent orators in the
city and his ability as a speaker was
well demonstarted on Sunday after
noon. He has had years of experi
ence in the schoolrooms of Texas, a
or twenty years he has been ar r.
';t.
if'
CI
I.
lor
IS
reif
It!
' t
7t ?
--

xml | txt