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The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, June 14, 1907, Image 2

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THE NASHVILLE GLOBE, FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1S07.
ive Sunday school worker. He gave
the audience the benefit of some of his
experiences and some of his knowl
edge of children as church workers.
His was an eloquent plea for closer
and better attention to the children.
Mr. Crenshaw said, "If the white boy
and white girl need the best teachers,
(he best instructors and the best sur
roundings to make them good, our
boys and our girls need equally as
much. They are children, they are
human and they assimilate; thus it
behooves us as parents and instruct
ors to guard every condition and ad
vance every opportunity to better the
instruction as well as the instructor,
The fact that the child of to-day in the
Sunday school will be the church of
to-morrow, has already been forcibly
Impressed upon you, and this move
ment to-day is calculated to bring the
best results in future years." "I have
known the manager," continued Mr
Crenshaw, "from his boyhood days,
and certainly pride myself as being
one of his early Instructors. If he has
accomplished anything, I feel proud
and I am certainly interested in every
thing that he undertakes."
After this address the manager an
nounced that the program would con
elude with the singing of one of Mr.
Itosborough's compositions from Ce
lestlal Showers, No. 2. The entire au
dience joined in rendering this song,
The echoes of the music rang: through'
out the park, filling the air with .the
strains of music produced by the
voices of the Christian workers who
had gathered to honor this occasion
The benediction was pronounced by
Itev. James Slaughter. Then the chil
dren, In their glee, with their teach
. ers and superintendents, strolled In
every direction through the park;
some climbed the hills, resting be
neath the tall, stately shade trees
others found their way to the merry
go-round, while hundreds seated them
selves on the large porch of the Club
House. It was seven o'clock in the
evening before the crowd left the
park. All are of the opinion that the
first Union Children's Day In Nash
ville wa3 a success.
MISS MOORE TO DEMONSTRATE
The appointment of Miss Elizabeth
Moore, of 926 Seventeenth avenue
North, by the Nashville Gas Company
as one of their demonstrators with the
new gas stoves, is a distinct recogni
tion of the ability of this young worn
an, who has long since been known as
one of the best culinary artists In the
city. Miss Moore has studied under
some of the ablest of the profession
.that .have come South. She deserves
this recognition and will prove by her
demonstration to the classes that wil
take advantage of these lessons, that
she is a proficient teacher.
Miss Moore is to demonstrate every
day next week, at 1509 Church stree
On Monday, Wednesday and Friday
the public exhibition will begin
2:30 and continue until 4:30 p. m
On Tuesday and Thursday they wil
begin at 7:30 and continue until 9:30
p. m. This has been so divided up in
order that every one will have an op
portunity to see what a gas stove or
range can do. The lessons, as well as
the exhibitions, are absolutely free.
The Gas Company has employed
heretofore only white demonstrators
but they are recognizing In this ap
pointment the ability of our own peo
ple. It Is hoped that a large attend
ance will be present each day and help
to convince others that we believe In
the advancement being made by the
young people.
Miss Moore is a graduate of Fisk Un
versity. She is a daughter of Rev. and
Mrs. Geo. W. Moore of this city and
held an honored position for severa
years" at the school In Albany, Ga.
BIRTHDAY ENTERTAINMENT.
A doUsrhtful entertainment was
that of Sunday afternoon. June 9, a
the residence of Mr and Mrs. Andrew
Jennings, of 924 South street, in hon
or of their daughter, Dollie EJizabeth
A two-course menu was served, con
sistinc of ices and cake. Those who
enjoyed the hospitalities of the occa,
sion were Mr and Mrs. Ulair, and Mrs
Annie Creel, of the Hermitage .
A MAGNIFICENT ENGRAVING OF
1 Miss Nannie H. Burroughs, the elo-
ouent evangel, the matchless organ
izer and Corresponding Secretary of
the Baotist Women's Auxiliary uon
vention. This engraving is made In
three colors resembling an oil paint
ine- nnd is suitable for the home, bun
flav school and chapels. Price only
fiftv rents. Agents wanted. The Co
rv-ed American Novelty Co.. P. O
Drawer 231, Washington, D. C.
PULASKI NOTES.
Hattie Steele, the a'dopted daughter
nf Dr. and Mrs. A. P. Gray, of Pulas
kl, departed this life June 6. Hattie
was beloved by all who knew ner as
shp was a loving, devoted child, ru
neral services were conducted by
Revs. H. L. P. Jones, P. El, and
Ho'lge, pastor Vale Mill circuit, at
Camnhell Chapel A. M. K. Churcn
Saturday. June 8. at 2 p. m. She
leaves one sister, other relatives and
a host of friends to mourn ner loss.
Her remains were interred at Maple
wood. Rev. A. P. Gray received the hon
x rary degree D. D. from Morris
wn College, Atlanta, Ga., recently.
' " ""
' y - 4 ..
THOMAS HENRY
To those who are disposed to take
the more hopeful or optimistic view of
the progress of the race, we invite at
tention to the following sketch of a
truly deserving young man, which
demonstrates the value of Christian
training as a stimulus to that thor
ough preparation for successful profes
sional life.
Thomas Henry Elliott was born in
Buford County, Tenn., educated in the
common schools of the county, and
taught in the county schools for seven
years. He subsequently entered the
High School at Lebanon, and gradu
ated therefrom with honor. His splen
did record as a conscientious pains
taking student led the trustees to ten
der him the appointment as Principal
of the Lebanon High "School, which
position he filled with eminent satis
faction for several years.
Recognizing the necessity of more
thorough training for the great work
in which,, he wished to devote hi3
time, energies and life, young Elliott
entered Walden University, graduat
ing from the College Course with the
Degree of B. S. As one of his teach
ers during his closing year In the
scientific course, the writer of this
sketch had an opportunity of know
ing more of the disposition and char
acter of this most promising young
GLEE CLUB ENTERTAINS.
Last Wednesday night, June 5, at
the residence of Mrs. W. A. Hadley
was given one of the most enjoyable
affairs of the season by the Knowles
School Glee Club boys. Games and
music were the features of the even
ing. The two spacious parlors were
beautifully decorated with the club
colors, blue and white. Palms and
cut flowers were also used in the dec
orations. At a late hour the com
pany was ushered to the dining
room, where they were served with
salad, fruits and . ices. From the
ceiling was suspended a lovely bell
from which blue and white ribbon
streamers were fastened to each cor
ner of the table. Those present
among the teachers were Mesdames
E. M. Dickerson and Carrie Brown,
Miss Cornelia Bailey and Dr. J. P.
Crawford, Misses Blanche Baker,
Georgia Connell, Emma Williams, Be
atrice Johnson, Annie Henderson,
nmelia Carpenter, Florence Monta
gue, Nettie Andrews, Savannah
Matthews, Julia Pope, Mabel Pas
chall, Anna Young, Messrs. Curly
Church, Arthur Fite, Wm. Smith. Fe
lix Harding, Ruben Richardson, Quin
ton Gleaves, Frank Smith, Jr., James
Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Nelson
Jackson.
ENJOYABLE PICNIC.
Purity Lodge, No 12, and Helio
trope Court, No. 18, gave their an
nual picnic at Wooddale Grove, June
10, 1907. The day was a most beau
tiful one, which permitted the pic
nickers to enjoy themselves through
out the day. The Knights- of Benev
olent Society consolidated with Pu
rity Lodge on this occasion, which
made it more successful from a finan
cial standpoint. The boat left for
Wooddale Grove about 10:30 o'clock
and made the trip within an hour.
During the whole day the I. O. I.
Band furnished splendid music, as did
also a string band of five or six
pieces, for those who wished to en
joy dancing. Mr. Tom Wells, the
well-known caterer, with his corps of
men furnished the 500 people with all
kinds of refreshments. The boat left
the grove at 5 o'clock, landing in the
city at 5:45 o'lock.
" ..... l
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., y
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ELLIOTT, M. D.
man. The teacher recognized in him
the elements of. leadership. He was
broad, courageous, conservative, well
poised and balanced, and added to all
these was his sturdy Christian spirit.
The young student entered Meharry
Medical College and completed the
Course of Study with honor, graduat
ing with the Class of 1906. He passed
successfully the examination before
the State Board of Examiners, receiv
ing well-merited recognition. He has
been for the last year one of the Fac
ulty of Meharry Medical School, and
has rendered most acceptable service.
He is a member of St. John African
Methodist Episcopal Church in this
city, has served as Superintendent of
the Sunday School, and has made a
splendid -impression upon all with
whom he has been associated.
One of the most important if, in
deed, not the mast important events Of
his life occurred at Shelbyvllle, Tenn.,
on the 12th of June, when he led Miss
Sallie Rainey, a most excellent young
lady, to the altar. Miss Rainey is also
a graduate of Walden Univer
sity, and will i be a splendid acces
sion to the professional roster of that
institution. After June 12, Dr. and
Mrs. Elliott will receive their friends
and patrons at 109 First Avenue,
South, Nashville, Tenn.
JOHNSON BOWSER WEDDING.
A marriage characterized' by ex
treme simplicity of detail, but of rare
beauty in execution, was that of Miss
Fannie Jane Bowser to Rev. James
A. Johnson, of Oklahoma City, solemn
ized at Lea Avenue Christian Church
June 5, at 8 o'clock. The church was
beautifully decorated with nalma nrwl
rubber plants, which formed a beauti-
iui DacK ground tor the bridal party
which stood in a semi-circle in front
of thera Rev. Treston Taylor per'
formed the impressive ceremony be
fore a large audience, after speaking
in glowing -terms of the bride, who has
been a member of the church
from childhood. The bride was a pic
ture or rare beauty in an organdy
gown trimmed in baby Irish lace,
and a tulle veil caught with
orange blossoms. Her bouquet was
of ferns and brides roses with
white satin streamers. Mr. Kelly
gave the bride away, meeting the
groom and his best man. Prof. J. W.
Johnson, of Columbia, at the sacred
altar. The bridesmaids were Misses
Pinkie Mayberrv. Ladv B. Rt
Magnolia Daniels, of Columbia, Elnora
Deaden and Saloam Harris, who was
maul of honor. They wore white or
gandy with pink and green sashes
and carried bouquets of pink carna
tions and maiden hair ferns. The
groomsmen were Messrs. F. A. Daw
son, Wm. D. Boger, Patterson
Wm. C. Fox and Walter Ahprnnthv
A reception was held at the bride's
home on Fifth Avenue, South, where
many friends gathered to extend
hearty congratulations. A three
course menu was served. Many hand
some and valuable presents were re
reived in silver, china, cut glass and
linen.
The bride and erroom left on th
11:30 train for their future home.
Oklahoma, City, where the groom is
one of the leading pastors of the A.
M. E. Church. Showers of rice were
abundant. The bride, the only daugh
ter pf Mrs. C. E. Bowser, has been a
teacher in the public schools of Nash
ville for many years, having finished
I he normal course of Roger Williams
University in 1887. She has not only
taught in Tennessee, but in Texas.
She made an, efficient teacher. She was
was nromine'nt in church and soMetv
work from ( 'Th she will be missed
Have You Catarrh?
Do Your Eyes Trouble You?
Do You Need Glasses?
OB HAVE YOT7 ANY
TROUBLE WTTB YOUR
BYES, EARS, NOSE
or THROAT?
IF SO, CONSULT
Dr. C. V. Roman,
SPECIALIST,
ROOMS 2 and 3
NAPIER COURT.
nashville,
Tenn.
VoorhGGS & Simms
DEALERS IN
AEW AND SECOND I1AKD
FURNITURE.
Cleaning and Repairing Neatly Done.
UPHOLSTERING A SPECIALTY.
rhone, Main 1342. 907 10th Ave. S.
Nashville, Tenn.
6-24.07tf
S. R.. SMITH,
Cash meat Market
"KOTHIMl BUT THE BEST"
Phone Main 3166-w 140 Fifth Avenut. S.
WHEN THINKING
OP
SHOES
THINK. Of
Abraham's
Think How Much
You Can Save
OUR EXPENSES IDC ICCC
our & prices AliL LLoO
- We are out of the
High Rent District
BIO STOCK TO SELECT FROM.
ABRAHAM'S
SHOE STORE
335 Public Square
Next to Transfer Station, North.
- -
Walter S. Thomas,
IsEUER II
CHOICE FRESH AND CUBED
MEATS.
Expert Sausage maker.
All Meats selected from Home Killed Stock.
Residence: 1911 FOURTH AYE., N.
Office 'Phone 1271. Residence 'Phone 3443-R
Dr, J. B. Singleton,
DENTIST.
Professor of Operative Dentistry and teach
er of Orthodontia and Dental Me
tallurgy Meharry Medical
College.
TEETH EXTRACTED BY SOMNO FORME
METHOD, ALL CLASSES OF DENTAL
WORK NEATLY DONE.
OFFICE: RESIDENCE:
408 Cedar St,
1116 Jefferson St.
29-07 tf.
PAiADt i-
FOR LODGES. I A
a.
V. ' M In
PLATE I.
We manufacture K. P. Lodge Eannors.
aS jper illustration given above, at prices
according to quality of materials ami
trimmings, ranging from ,$.r)() t0 $?'; silk
embroidered work from $S0 to $110; hand
embroidered bullion work from to
$260. Specifications furnished on banners
at any price desired. :: ::
PLATE 2.
: IB V..v.Y.VjV--7
I IF
This hows a very popular design fori'
i. U. O. of O. F. Lodges. Front inadelJ
nf white flat silk. T.ainlirpniiin nf dif.
tain, of red silk. Painferl m onU l,.afi4
and oil colors, back of red banner sateen. ' ' LV.
Trimmed with imported gold lace, fring
tassels, etc. Hardwood pole, wood cro;
bar. rn cover and holster. TWo m
tt- yil. K' ' the ah"ve Banners will 1b
made for any other orjl on at satnu
prices, changing emblems and lettering
to suit the Order. :: ::
For further Information write to
National Baptist Publishing Board.
R. H. BOYD, Secieiary,
523 Second Ave N. Nashville, Tenn.
TO RESPONSIBLEPERSONS
Un Their mm Notce
4 n mm
VITHOJT SECURITY.
ME KESTUCRJ LOAN r
316(B,U STKIH : I P Slj
Room 7 Twin Building,
Oct nod
NASHVILLE, .
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