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The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, July 19, 1907, Image 4

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TIK3NASTIVILLS GLOBE, FRIDAY, JULY 19, ISO?.
The Nashville Globe.
Published Ererr Friday in tha Year.
i. vaa ftiiowt Hill. No. 447 WmuVk Arr
nue, North, Nathalie, Tcjul,
t
THE GLOBE PUBLISHING CO.
Telephone 4jJ-L
J. 0. BATTLE Eorroi
Entered u iecondlua watttct Taauary ifc
1906, at the pott office at ftaahrillc, Tcanet
aee, under the act of Congreaa ! Much j.
No Notice taken of anoojrmoua contribu
tion.
SUBSCRIPTIONS IN ADVANCE.
Oqo Year 1 M
Single Copy qj
Notify the office when you fail to get your
lper.
ADVERTISING KATES FUfcNISHXD
UPON APPLICATION.
HADING MATTU 1ATU. .
t ri-mtm ncr Una for each inaertiiMk.
cent per line for each inaertioa (black
lacej.
Centracta for 1,000 line to be taiten in a
fear, made at j cent per line
Adrertiainf copy ahotdd i is th office
lot later than Tuesday 0 a. m. of each week.
TO THE PUBLIC
Any erroneoua reflection upon Ike charac
ter, standing or reputation of any per too,
firm or corporation, which may appear in the
columna of THE NASHVILLE GLOBE will
be (ladly corrected upon being brought to the
attention ot toe management.
nd rarrMtuitirlnr for nublieatiAa bo
to reach thin office Monday. No matter in-
tended for current issue which arrive as late
a Iburaday can appear in that number, as
Thursday ia oresa dT.
All news matter sent us for publication
must be written only on on side of the pa
per, ana should De accompanies tJ in mum
of the contributor; not ncceaaarily for fubli
cation, but as an evidence ot good tatta.
SOUTHERN SCHOOL TEACHERS.
A friend of The Globe informs us
that we were in error in an editorial
note in which we intimated that Prof.
Webber, superintendent of the city
school, was not Southern born. We
did not know where Prof. Webber was !
born but we had an idea that he and I
his father emigrated to Tennessee
from Europe. This made us ask "If
the colored schools would be contami
nated bv Northern ideas then why not
the same of the whites?"
We have never taken the reports
printed in a local paper and sent out
by the Associated Press seriously. We
thought them to be the work of some
"cub" reporter who had garbled what
the superintendent had really said,
In fact, we thought the reports too sil
ly to be an accurate account of what
really transpired in that meeting, the
alleged actions of which have been I
commented upon by newspapers all
over the country.
Northern ideas have been freely
adapted to Southern conditions in the
school of Nashville, and it is on this ac
count that our schools hold such a
hisrh Dlace in comparison with like
schools all over the country. If they
don't hurt the whites they would
scarcely hurt the blacks.
But the main objection to -the an-
nouncement, which we have character
ized above as being in our opinion su-
ly, is that it puts a premium upon
mediocrity and thus hurts the school
system. Every citizen and especially
those who are tax-payers, would and
should prefer to see men and women
of our city employed as teachers; but
no one who has the real welfare of
the public schools at heart should de-
"rnnnd that a certain person should
have the preference for a position sim
ply because he was born at a certain
place or was a certain color, no mat
ter whether competent or otherwise.
Efficiency and morality should be the
supreme tests. Any other taking pre
cedence over these will harm the
schools and yet not help to bring
about that better relation between the
races of which the Board of Education
and all other good citizens are desir
ous. a wrnucmAT i
xjxi.jivik.
The pardoning power 01 me iru
- at 11 T 1 I
Jesus Christ seems to be working over-
time these days. Though it has been
act,pa that. Vardaman was converted.
v. . - . - ,
of th arts reputed to him since
the report of his conversion would tend
D " " ' - I
.t,, .t if 1,1 fcpart has not hftfin
IO fcUUW iiia.1, 11 r
touched his political diplomacy has
W4IV 1UVUU1 .... AVI.. . ,. . . .j . "
been sharpened. Now comes Leland
Hume, the Vardaman of the Nashville
vrd of Trade, the prime mover, we
as he was chairman of the of
performing an pet that jeers paying the same fare helps some.
makes us believe that he, too, has "got
religion."
Mr. Hume headed a committee of
East Nasvllle citizens, which present
ed to James Trimble, the veteran col
ored fireman who resigned from the
department last week, a valuable pres
ent. Not so valuable to Mr. Trimble
on account of its intrinsic worth, but
because it showed the love, the high es
teem with which he is regarded by
those in whose midst he has labored
for the past twenty-three years.
worthy man, a commendable action
upon the part of the white citizens.
But we started to call attention to
the embryonic -Vardaman, Mr. Leland
Hume, wun tne desire to Know 11 ne
ha3 really ' fessed religion" in the
past month. Surely the radical gen
tleman of the Cumberland Telephone
Company who, seemingly, has labored
so faithfully to get himself in that
class of Negro-phobes of which Ben
Tillman
is an excellent specimen,
would not condescend to head a com
mittee that was showing its apprecia
tion of the faithful services of a Ne
gro! Leland Hume the friend of a
Negro? He must have "got religion"
at least for a few minutes.
I Georgia took an advanced step for
southern states when the senate voted
to prohibit the sale or manufacture of
spirituous liquors in the state. If the
mleasure passes the house it is thought
that Gov. Hoke Smith will approve the
bill and thus make the state the only
one in the South where there is abso
lute prohibition, but we suspect when
the law goes into effect it will be as
easy to get "white corn" in some of
the dry towns as heretofore.
With the advent of hot weather
comes the picnics. If we had as many
hot days in the year as we have pic-
Uics in this town during the summer
there would not be any winter,
I mi 1
ine yorauy contest nas oegun to
slzzle and tne candidates have begun
to line up. The man that gets the Ne-
square deal on the question of improv
ing streets.
Candidates for positions in the gift
of the A. M. E. general conference are
a3 thick as flies around a honey pot
ut when the vote Is counted, if D. A
Hart be defeated,- the man that wins
will know that he has been in the race
of his life.
The Ananias Club is -still in exist
ence. Every now and then we hear of
Harriman orsome other "undesirable
citizen" breaking into the newspapers
Teddy, like Alexander the Great,
is
doubtless resting and looking for oth
ers to conquer,
How on earth can anyone take Ed
war(j Ward Carmack seriously as a
candidate for the democratic presiden
tial nomination? Carmack could not
beat a man in his home state who
had been rated as only a second-class
fiddler!
It seems that the local authorities
have no desire to separate the Hannah
Flins'pa nnd thi Plntr'a nf Wachvlllo
The sherlffB offlce Beems about M un
mindful of these.
stenches as police
headquarters.
The Brownsville affair, is not dead
but sleeping. With the reopening of
Congress the incident is liable to oc
cupy the centre of the stage again.
The same old story of many called
but few chosen. Five passed out of
nrtCC f HI T frtlf irfl i?n nrVt v AnvAHA1 V a st4d-.
examinations for positions as teach
- -
erS - About the Bame .ratio of whIteg
to0 - There's a screw loose somewhere
n, 1 rr jii .. . ,
lu,uer tusheu n
. 4u t n n.vi
" - "ownwra, 01
,jWUIS",e - "ueu luruer laKeS Snun,
- i 1 1
r six monms
The decision of the Interstate Com
merce Commission anent the providing
equal accommodations for passen
There was no question of social equal
ity involved simply the rights to ob
tain what was paid for.
Our Navy seems to believe in killing
men with those guns which Uncle
Sam bought for his battleships. If
they can't kill the enemy then by care
lessness, if not what is worse, we kill
our own men. '
MRS. JOSIE PRICE DEAD.
The musical fraternity of Nashville,
as well as the secret organizations and
the religious bodies, sustained an ir
reparable loss last Saturday evening in
the death of Mrs. Josle Price, who died
at 5 p. m. at her residence in Eighth
avenue, North, near the corner of Gay
street. Mrs. . Price was possibly bet
ter known in Nashville than any oth
er young woman. . She had spent most
of -her life here, having come from
Memphis when she was about twelve
years, of age. She entered Walden
University, from which school she
graduated both from the literary and
musical departments. She was the
daughter of Rev. Mr. Price, a presiding
elder, of the M. E. Church, and bore
the reputation of being one of the lead
ing musicians in the city. She was a
vocalist of rare ability, a composer and
an editor of a musical newspaper.
Thus the Journalistic world sustains a
loss. Mrs. Price had been in poor
health, for the past two years, but it
seemed at one time, that she would re
cover. The Globe rontainprl a nntira
on April 12, that the health of Mrs.
Pice was improving. She continued
to, improve for several months, but the
ravages of the dreaded disease, known
as tuberculosis, seemed to have laid its
Arm grasp upon her. She had not
been able to leave her home since the
day after the commencement exercises
of the Verdi Conservatory of Music, of
wnicn sne was the founder and princi
pal. She was also an organizer of the
verdl Kindergarten School. In fact.
there was not. hunter woman T1
Nashville than the deceased.
The funeral services were held at
warn Memorial Chapel, Monday after
noon at i 0 clock. There was an enor
mous outpouring of sympathizing and
sorrowing friends, as Mrs. Price was
a worker in all of the churches, irre
apeuuve vi aenomination. and was
oved and . respected by all. As the
funeral cortege entered the church, the
organist of Clark Memorial played a
ow, sorrowful funeral march. The
remains were followed bv Rebecca
Court of Calanthe, of which the de
ceased was a member. Rev. Dr. John
son, pastor of the church, officiated,
wnne uev. I. H. Welch, D. D., pre
siding elder of the A. M. E. Church,
assisted on the part of his church,
and Rev. Wm. Craft, on the part of
me itaptists,
Two choirs,' one from Clark Memo
rial and one from Mt. Olive Baptist
Church, sang alternately during the
services. Beautiful eulogies on the life
of the deceased were delivered by Miss
Mamie Bradon, of Walden University,
who gave a complete history of her
since sue was twelve when she en
tered school at Walden up to the close
or the present school year as a teach
er in the music department. Rev. Dr,
Johnson delivered an able sermon, tak
ing his text from the Psalms of David
and comparing the deceased's life with
that of David, as a great musician.
Kev. Dr. Welch read a poem, and Mr
J. Thomas Turned read another, en
titled "josle Price is dead." Rev. Wm
Craft read resolutions of condolence
signed by a long list of friends, as well
as the students of the Conservatory of
music ana tne verdl School
Just before the vast throng viewed
tne remains, Mt. Olive Choir, with Mr
Frank Teasley at the piano, sang the
deceased's favorite song, "Never alone."
There was hardly a dry eye in
1 1-. i
audience at the conclusion of this song
i ne runerai designs, were nnmerrm
and beautiful. The deceased leaves n fa.
ther. sister, brother, several rPintivoo
and a large number of friends to
mourn her loss. The remains were
Interred in Greenwood Cemetery.
vmtKAiN ur the FAMOUS FIF- j
lT-ruUKlH MASSACHU
SETTS IN TOWN.
Mr. William D. Kelly spent Wednes
day and Thursday in the city, the
?uest or Mr. and Mrs. John II. Kelly,
n bt)j uasa street. Mr. Kellv has
ieen making Columbia his home for
the past two years. His boyhood
days were spent in New Bedford,
Mass., where he received the benefits
of the excellent schools in that city.
t an early age he enlisted In the
famous Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts
Regiment, Col. Shaw commanding,
which fought so bravely against a
arger iorce at Fort Wagner, S. C,
during the Civil War. Mr. Kelly is a
brother of Prof. J. II. Kelly, of Colum
bia, and uncle of Mr. John II. ICelly,
Tr of the composing room force of
the National Baptist Publlshine
louse.
HENRY NOEL IN THE CITY.
Mr. Henry Noel, son of Dr. and Mrs.
I. T. Noel, who for several years has
been in the West for bis health re-
urncd to tli3 city frrnj Lc3 An.clt:,
Closing
FOR THE NEXT 30 DAYS
We will close , out all spring and summer
goods regardless of price. Men's and Boys
Clothing, Hats and Furnishing Goods, Men's
Ladies and Children's Shoes, all up to date
styles, must be sold.
Come and for Yourself.
Remember we are Sole Afents for W. L. Douglas Shoes.
I. B. ELLIS, Cor. Public Square and Cedar St.
TUE BIG SOCIETY EVEJiT OF THE YEAR.
Methodist Pub. House
vs
Baptist Pub. House,
BENEFIT Y. M. C. A.
ATELETIC PARK,
MONDAY,
JULY 29, 1907.
ADMISSION.
Gents to Graud Stand - 25 Cts.
Ladies - - 15 Cts.
7. ,
leillS 10 JHCacners
- 15 Cts.
Sunday School Children 10 Cts.
All Preachers Free.
Game Called at 3:30 p. m.
MR. W. J. BLANTON,
Will furnish you with a nice line ot
Jewelry, Eye Glasses, , Watches, Rings
Bracelets and Necklaces.
An Assortment of Jewelry will be brought
to your home by request.
Eaiy termi can be secured after first payment
Orders Promptly Filled.
Address 1A7. J. BLANTON.
With I). Lowcuheim & Co.,
(00 1'ulou mt and Fourth tv.i-., I. phone, Main '116.
3-ZSM17.
Cal., last Saturday. The lone trip
completely exhausted both Mr. Noel
and his Mother, who accomDanied
him, but he appears to be in better
health than when he last visited his
home.
Just how long Mr. Noel will remain
in the city has not been decided as he
will be governed completely by the
physician's advice. He spent the past
winter in Arizona and it is probable
that he will return there later.
MR. JOHN
THOMAS CARUTHERS
AT HOME.
On Tuesday evening July 16. Mr.
lohn Thomas Caruthers. of the class
of 1907, Amherst College, arrived in
the city, coming directly from the
Bast via St. Louis. Mr. Caruthers.
I since leaving the state, has won hon
. . '
r tan,d reco&nltion as a young man,
" '1U "iat "c BPna a iew
weeks ln the city with his aunt, Mrs
-cirew Lartwright, of Patterson
street. His friends will be glad to
welcome him back to Nashville. It is
aot known whether Mr. Caruthers will
accept the position offered ' him ln
Jersey City. N. J.. or not. hut fnr the
present he will consider only a good
summer vacation.
SAD NEWS.
The death of Miss Mary Ellen
South, of Chicago, was quite a sur
prise to her many friends. She has
been living ln Chicago for quite a
while, and came to Nashville Sunday
morning feeling well and jolly and
took slck Sunday evening and died
Monday, bne was expected to spend
the summer with her mother and rel
atives but the Good Master took her
for a purpose.
ENTERTAINED IN EASTLAND.
Miss Amanda E. Jordan, of 710
Eighth avenue, South, one of Nash
ville's popular young ladies accom
panied by Mrs. B. F. Wade, of Tenth
avenue, south, were delightfully en
tertained at a 5 o clock luncheon in
Eastland last Sunday at the home of
Mrs. Richard Smith. Miss Jordan
was very pretty in a lovely costume
the trimings being Irish Tolnt lace.
The evenirj was pnent delightfully.
Out Sale
M. W. BUF0RD,
FIRST-CLASS BARBER.
Hair Cut 25cls. Shave lOcts.
Clean Shop. Courteous Attention.
117 FOURTH AVE. S, Nashville, Tenn-
iREENlVt
nn
ARK!.
OWNED BY
Colored People,
OPERATED BY
Colored People.
FOR
Colored People.
J. W. SHERRILL,
GROCERY CO,
FRESH MEATS. FRUITS VEGETABLES.
All Kinds of Canned Goods
Telephone. 4776. 107 8th Ave., S.
D. WESLEY CRUTCHCR.
WILI, BE PLEASED TO HAVE
YOU CAU, ON HIM AT
H AIM AN LOEB'S,
226 FOURTH AVE., NORTH.
Where he will be glad to show you an
elegant stock . of high grade, up-to-date
TAILORING.
Hats and Men's Furnishing Goods
At Moderate Prices.
R. I!. DeGrafenried,
UP-TO-DaTE TAII nn,
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Strict Attention Paid to ladies' Work.
CLEANING, DYEING AND RE
PAIRING. 430 Cedar St., Nashville, Tenn.
7-i2-o8-tf
Incorporated UiMer the lam ofTennessee.
One-Cent Savings Bank.
CAPITAL STOCK, $25,000.00.
Doti a
uauiLluv nil1nAca
tercatpaidoa all time deposits. Only
w ina in Tenne
essee.
n. botd pre8ldent
J.C.Napibr, Cashier,
CiM. Lanoston, Teller.
411 FOURTH AYEMT, KCRRt
TENNESsrs
r

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