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The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, July 19, 1907, Image 8

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THE NASHVILLE GLOBE, FRIDAY, JULY 19, 1307.
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THE
eautiful
vision
dUDfl
of NASHVILLE
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on
Within Ti'o Blocks of the
ite C
ift
ar Line Extension on Jefferson
St.
Take a W. Nashville car and go to Clifton Ave., then go north until
you come to the property. We are selling this at a low price and on the
easiest terms imaginable.
01 DOM CASH AP BALANCE 50c WEEKLY
Without interest or taxes and giving you our better than Life Insurance
plan. This property is to-day surrounded by nice homes and occupied by
the owners. j
SALE lO A. VL, MONDAY, JULY 29.
A One Room Cottage at $25.00 Cash, Balance $1.25 Per Week:.
The REALTY SAVINGS BANK AND TRUST CO.,
A sic for 7VYr. Stewart.
Corner FOURTH AVE. and UNION ST.
4444444ii444444444444444444444444'444444444444444444444444444 444444444444'44
SPORTING NEWS.
BY LEON.
THERE'S SOMETHING DOING.
On Monday, July 29, the Methodists
and Baptists lock horns before the
public of Nashville for the first time.
These teams represent two of the
largest Negro publishing houses in the
world, so nothing short of a multitude
of people will be present to urge his
or her team to victory. The teams
are so evenly matched that there will
have to be some errors made for the
reapers of honor to ever reach the
goal. Now everybody who is of the
Baptist or Methodist belief has a
chance to be present and lend their
aid in a good cause and at the same
time have a jolly good time. 'The plac
ards and bills are out telling all
about this great game. Each team is
hard at practice and will be until Mr.
"Bill" Stewart says "play ball," on the
2th inst.
The xraders of The Globe all want
to know who is "Leon." Well, if you
come to see this game you will see
him on the coaching line. All the
women folks will be out in great style.
Well, enough said.
Foster Speaks.
Andrew "Rube" Foster evidently
takes a decidedly different view from
the claim of the correspondent who
writes that McClelland, of the Phila
delphia Giants, and Buckner, of the
Royal Giants, are the best colored
pitchers in the world, and, in defense
of his past achievements, submits the
following statement for the judgment
of the baseball public who read "The
Tribune:"
"Buckner. McClelland, Wilson, the
Western crack, and myself (Foster)
were the pitchers last year selected to
1 lay in the Cuban League. I had the
pleasure of meeting each of these gen
tlemen in competition with the follow
ing results: I won 11 out of 10 games;
McClelland did not win a single con
test; George Wilson won three games,
while Buckner did succeed in winning
one game. Each one of these players
met me three or more times. Both
Buckner and McClelland lost the col
ored championship games to me. 1
furthermore issue the following chal
lenge: Will play the Philadelphia
Giant3 in Philadelphia or anywhere,
for any amount they care to play for,
and would give anything for that 'win
ner take all gag' of theirs.
"signed:
"ANDREW RUBE FOSTER."
A comparison with the box scores,
snows that Lloyd Hill, Bowman and
Pet way, of the Philadelphia Giants;
Harris, Winston, Payne, Rose, Booker
and Gatewood, of the Leland Giants,
are youngsters that are doing eauallv
as good work as any of the veteransj
and In many instances they excel. (
During the last few years the West
has imported colored stars to fill every
position on the diamond, with one ex
ception, and that is first-base. No
player from the- North, East, South
or West seems as capable of holding
down first-base in the manner in which
Ray Wilson daily performs for the
Philadelphia Giants.
On the Fourth of July the Leland
Giants realized $525 as their share for
the two games played against the
Gunthers. Philadelphia Tribune.
Gans Willing to Fight Dane.
New York, July 9. Joe Gans, the
great colored pugilist, blinked at the
white lights on Broadway last night
for a few minutes. He didn't tarrv
long and while he was hre was on the
light job strictly.
He had an appointment with Tex
Kickard, the Nevada mining man and
light promoter, and droDned in to see
him on his way to the West.
Rickard is anxious to pull off a re
turn fight between Gans and Nelson.
and says he believes he can find a $40,
000 purse for the fight if pulled off in
Nevada sometime in September, uret
er ably Labor Day.
Gans told Rickard last night that he
would leave the arrangements in his
nands and would abide by anything he
and Nelson would agree upon, reserv
ing one point the weight. Gans in
sists that they weigh in at the ring
side in fighting costume at 133 pounds.
The division of the purse, Gans said,
would be secondary with him, so long
as it was not absolutely unreasonable.
He Insists, too, that Billy Nolan, the
Dane's manager, be made to do busi
ness in writing from first to last this
time.
"I don't want to talk to Nolan," he
faid, "about the fight. Let him sign
the agreement Mr. Rickard draws up.
or has drawn up for us, and 1 will put
my name to it in a hurry."
Gans is looking well and says he is
feeling fine. "All I need to make me
nappy," he said, "is a little of Nelson's
coin. I expect to be happy, too, if I
nrt a chance to get in the ring with
him again." -Philadelphia Tribune.
Benefit for Dixon.
A scheme is under way to have an
entertainment for the benefit of George
Dixon. There is not the slightest
doubt that Dixon needs the money,
and if any plan can be arranged by
which the receipts will go to the form
er champion and not be diverted to
other sources, well and good. The pro
moters of the affair should see to it
that the money Is put away in such
manner that it can be drawn only In
small amounts at regular intervals,
and by Dixon only. Otherwise Dixon
will not derive much benefit from the
entertainment.
The Battler Wants to' Fight at Some
thing Over 133-Pound Limit
Trick Is Looked for.
What is Bill Nolan fishing for now?
Nolan is out with a statement that
Nelson may demand a weight over the
133-pound limit of the lightweight
class if he fights Gans.
"I'm a little fellow," said Nelson. "I
don't weigh over 138 right now, and I
can easily fight at 133 pounds In my
tights. I can do 130 if I want to. Gans
is a big fellow beside me. I ain't go
ing to give him none the best of the
weight. He'll have to weigh in at 133
at 3 o'clock, and weigh in with all
his fighting togs on, or there won't be
no fight."
Comparing these two statements, No
lan's latest outbreak has a queer look.
What new scheme has he evolved now?
Although such a trick would be some
thing of a chestnut, it looks as if he
intended to make the match with
Gans at 133 stripped, and then demand
the weighing in with trunks, shoes
and gloves on at the last moment, just
as he did at Goldfield. By doing that
I he would force Gans to take off a
couple of pounds on the morning of
the fight, weakening him just as he
did before. For ways that are dark
and for tricks that are vain, Nolan
has the heathen Chinee backed off the
hoards. He always wants to have an
ace or two up his sleeve-, even if he
has to rob another deck. -Clipping.
Fitzsimmons Knocked Out in Second
Round by Jack Joihnson.
Jack Johnson stopped "Bob" Fitz
simmons in the second round of a six
round boxing bout before the Wash
ington Sporting Club . Wednesday
night. Fitzsimmons did not show the
trace of his former prowess, and It is
probable that Johnson could have
stopped him in the opening round if
he hid cared to do so. The blow that
nut Fitzsimmons out was a right to
the jaw. The old man fell to the
floor, and as he made no attempt to
rise the referee stopped, the bout.
The hissing which usually follows
knockouts of this character was ab
sent, the spectators evidently taking
compassion on the former pugilistic
star.
Referee Keenah refused to act In the
ring because he had heard that Fitz
simmons had a badly sprained arm.
The Manager of the Club then entered
the ring, and watched the uneven
match. In the opening round Johnson
tapped Fitzsimmons when and where
he chose, but the latter was unable to
even land his famous counters.
It will be seen from this meeting
that it is now up to Burns, Squires or
Jefferies. Come on, Jack; and may
you, like Gans, our fair lightweight
representative, soon lead in your class
of fighters.
The World's Famous Bicycle Rider
Again on the Track.
Major Taylor, the world-famous cy
clist, who is now riding in Europe,
has demonstrated the fact that he is
far from being a back number.
Three years ago he retired from the
track because of the continued Amer
ican prejudice. He had a contract to
ride in France, but canceled it and
returned home, because McFarland,
Kramer and a number of American
riders had planned to do some more
of their famous combination trickery
in a great International meeting. .
Major Taylor was willing to meet
any man in the world in a special
match race. He met and defeated the
champion of every country while he
was in Europe, and then McFarland
and Lawson went to Australia from
here and challenged him. In one race
they got him in a pocket and run him
up the bank. In his attempt to go
around, the fouled him, throwing him
over the fence and injuring him se
verely. When he recovered, several
weeks later, to prove that he was
their master, he rode both of them
special match races and defeated
them, Then he refused to ride any
more race and returned to America,
and retired from the tracks, and for
breaking his contract he was sued for
$10,000 by the French syndicate. The
rase remained in Court several years,
and was settled this spring by Mr
Taylor agreeing to return to Paris and
ride. Since being there he has broken
the world s record and defeated all
comers. It simply proves that if a
man takes good care of himself that
he is good for many years in athletics
Little Major Taylor is a most remark
able little gentleman, and when, he
quit riding the public quit attending
bicycle races and it soon died out.
Freeman,
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Jockeys To-Day Inferior to Jockeys of
Old.
There are no jockeys real ones, I
mean to-day," says Starter Jake Holt
man. "You find an occasional Lee, or a
Miller, developed over night, and he
becomes a nine-day wonder, but It is
not because he is as great as the race
riders whose names will endure as
long as the sport lasts.
"The star jockey of to-day lack that
finish that marked the work of . the
.stars of yesterday. When Taral, Isaac
Murphy and boys like that were in
their prime we had real jockeys.
They were postboys, judges of pace,
great finishers, masters of their art
in every way.
"Why, an owner could tell one of
them to take a horse along at, say, a
two-minute clip, and if you held your
watch on him you would find him not
more than a second out of the way.
That's judging pace. Our stars of to
day don't know how to do it. Thejt-
navent tne long training and experi
ence thOSfi bovs had. ThPv ara maIo
in a hurry and don't last long.
"Even Miller is not a iudee of nar.e.
He is a post boy and knows how to
get his mount away. This is his forte
and accounts for his remarkable suc
cess. Other bovs to-dav atp rtntn?
good work merely because they haye
strength and nerve. Thev take
chances that no other human being
would take and they get away with it.
As long as their courage lasts they
shine. The minute they get a bad fall
or any other kind of a scare they are
done for. They know enough to keep
the horse's head straight while at the
post.
"That is the main thing. It means
a good getaway and gives them a lead.
The owner and the public to-day only
ask for results, and if a boy gets re
sults without having mastered his art
he satisfies the demand." Clipping.
CARD OF APPRECIATION.
We, the family of Mrs. Hester Cope
lnnd. wish to express our thanks and
appreciation to our friends, both col
ored and white for overy kindness
shown us during our sad hour of be-v
ronvement. Respectfully, her daught
er and sisters, Mayme Louise Cope
land. Mayme Thompson and Mrs
Louise Ewing.
Or. 0. E3. artin
Physician and Surgeon.
OFFICE: RESIDENCE:
HnuK-Vl mhr!!n s 500 rif,h
Telephone, Main 4443-W. 6-28-07-4t.
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