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The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, November 08, 1907, Image 3

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THE NASHVILLE GLOBS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, S, 1007.
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y ORGANS)1
FOR THE
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Parlor, an
Chapel
One of the most beautiful pictures in the home, a
church or a Sunday school, is an organ one that
is built to suit the home, the congregation and
the financial condition of the people. This is what
a National Baptist organ will do.
The parlor organs are in three
styles:
Style No. 2 is 5 octaves, action
B, oak case only.
Style No. 3 is 5 and 6 octaves,
oak case only.
Style No. 5 is 5 and 6 octaves,
case is oak or walnut.
Style No. 75 is our new de
sign. It is quarter sawed, golden
oak polish and is put up in a six
octave dase.
SOLD FOR CASH OR ON IN
STALLMENT TERMS.
Lillian Ba&Ker with such singular
grace and with every participant mov
ing in auch perfect rhythm, that many
of the figures received unstinted ap
plause, in ail it was one .01 the pret
tiest drills that has ever been pro
duced In Nashville. Miss Georgia A.
Bradford, assisted by Miss Nannie 1.
Sumner, presided at the piano. The
ladies participating in the drill were
Misses Hazel Thompson, Maud Harri
son, Minnie Hunter, Mollie Berry,
Esther Pinkard, Georgia Watluns,
Laura Smith, Bessie Martin, Alberta
Davis and Carrie Bryant.
Following the drill a novel menu
contest was held, in which each guest
was given an opportunity to display
his or her ingenuity at naming the ten
things that were to be served at
luncheon. The names o the articles
to be guessed appeared in various
parts of the double parlors as riddles
The first prize, a book of toasts, went
to Miss Esther Pinkard. Mr. D. Wes
ley Crutcher captured the consolation
prize after u spirited contest with four
other guests.
In the true spirit of All-Hallowe'en,
the witch was present with fortunes
for all. Several of these fortunes
scored distinctive hits. For luncheon,
the members of the H- T. G. M. Club
were masked in weird ghostlike ap
parel and auctioned off to the gentle
man bidding the highest number of
peanuts. The Bradford residence was
decorated attractively, though ex
t.mmelv odd aDDearins with hobtrrli-
Una, black cats', IL T. G. M. Club
banners and the club colors. The
rlinlni? room was the marvel of all.
The table was covered with beautifuf
doth in autumn colors and lighted by
candles with shades to match. In the
center was a huge pumpkin filled to
overflowing with the most luscioiib
fruits and surrounded by tiny black
cats with shining yellow eyes. Scat
tered over the cloth in artistic de
al sms were autumn leaves and chrys
anthemums. Bonbon dishes filled with
mints were placed at regular intervals
ouitsldie the circle of kittens making
the table an ideal creation of abun
dance and weird Hallowe'en phantasy.
Those oresent were Mr. and Mrs. J.
W. Bostic, 'Mir. and Mrs. Louis Berry,
Mesdames Andrew Cartwright, Lula
Ellis, of Muskogee, I. T., R. S. White,
Ijmra Smith. Misses Tennie Hughes,
Lucy White, Lady Emma Louise Phil
lips, Elvira White, Carrie Bryant, Lil
lian Badger, Georgia Watklns, Mollie
Berry, Maud Harrison, Nannie Sum
ner, Minnie Hunter, Esther Pinkard,
Hazel Thompson, Bessie Martin, Al
berta Davis, Messrs. Thomas' Hat
cliffe, C. H. Phillips, Jr., Wilbur Fu
gitt, Samuel Carter, S. L. Houston,
Fred Work, J. O. Battle, Chas. Ilos
kins. John Fleming. J. Frank Battle,
Will Davis, Eugene Page, Robert
Green, Wesley Crutcher, Chas. Mor
gan and Ernest Cole.
The next meeting of the II. T. G.
M. Club will be held at the residence
of Miss Mollie Berry, 1211 Jefferson
street, November 12, 1907.
op a field that has thus far remained
undeveloped and unnoticed. Prof.
F. G. Smith, the President and Gen
eral manner, nas hod some experi
ence in collecting exhibits and doing
exposition work. He was the State
Agent for the Executive Committee
of Negro Exhibits at the Jamestown
Exposition and served on the Educa
tional Committee of the Negro De
partment of the Tennesse Centennial.
With such an energetic man, it Its
head, the Globe sees no reason wny
this enterprise' should not be a de
cided success.
ST. JOHN A. M. E. CHURCH HAS
NEW PASTOR.
On lasit Tuesday night at St John
A. M. E Church the regular weekly
class meeting was held. In the early
hours of the night the weather was
very threatening, and under normal
conditions there would not have been
a dozen members out, but on this oc
casion a goodly number were present
The members had learned that tnu
conference which closed its. session
Monday night saw fit to change their
pastor and they were out (to bid Dr.
T. W. Ilaisler. their former pastor.
good bye, and to greet Dr. IS. U. Gor
don, recently of Shelbyville, but who
has been assigned this charge. Dr.
Gordon has been a very successful
pastor at some of the largest charges
In this state, and was elected by the
last annual conference of his church
as a delegate to the next general
Conference, which convenes in Nor
folk, Va., in May, 1908
VEUM KLNDElUiAKTEX.
MISS MATTIE F. MATTHEWS,
PRINCIPAL.
St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church.
Corner Eighth avenue. North and
Gay street.
A Christian school, though unde
nominational, where every attention if
given to Intellectual development,
moral training and social culture.
Particular attention given to the
study of the books and parts of the
Bible, Arithmetic, Reading, Spelling,
Writing, Drawing, Vocal and Instru
mental Music.
This school Is a high-class prepara
tory school for children 4 years old
and up.
Third term begins Wednesday, Sept
11, 1907. Tuition, 50 cents per month
(Id advance). Pupils enter any time.
For information address
MISS MATTIE F. MATTHEWS,
440 Eighth avenue, North.
8-2-07-1 yr
CONCERT AND SUPPER.
There will be a concert and supper
at the Benevolent Hall, East Hill
street. Monday night November 11,
for the benefit of Mt Gilead. Baptist
Church. Instrumental solo, Bessie
Pacv: instrumental Duet, Clara Da
vis, Mary Page; solo, Mr. W. J.
Blanton; instrumental duet, Lucy
Spence, Parthenia Page; chorus by
the choir: recitation, Vadie Clay-
brooks, recitation, Elnora Majors; in
strumental solo, Mary L. Page; fan
drill, Kitty M. Davis, captain.
n r
APPLY FOR. FURTHER INFORMATION TO THE
NATIONAL BAPTIST PUBLISHING BOARD,
R. H. BOYD, Secretary,
NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE.
THE NEGRO INDUSTRIAL, EDUCA-
TIONAL AND AGRICULTURAL
FAIR ASSOCIATION.
COMPLIMENTARY TO MR. HENRY
LAPSLEY.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Holmes enter
tained at dinner Sunday in honor of
Mr. Henry Lapsley. The table was
artistically decorated and filled with
the choicest delicacies of the season.
Those invited were Mr. Henry Laps-
ley, Mrs. Burrell, Mrs. Dan Keebie,
and Mrs! Payne.
REV. GRIGGS TO SPEAK IN MONTGOMERY.
Tho Rev. Sutton E. Griggs, pastor
of the First Baptist Church, East
Nashville, and an author and speaker
of the first magnitude, has accepted an
invitation to deliver an address m
Montgomery, Ala., the latter part of
the month. Rev. Griggs will speak at
one of (the largest churches in that
city and as the lecture is being well
advertised, ho will doubtless be greet
ed by a large audience.
Dry Goods and Carpet Go.
Third Avenue, between Union Street
and Public Square.
r
Carry tlie Best Stock ol Carpets,
The. Best Assortment ol Silks and
uressuooQs, i
The Handsomest Line ol Cloaks
and Suits.
1--'Htf
-
DEATH OF MISS H. MYRA
NORTON.
A very sad accident happened at
the school Wednesday, October 16.
Miss H. Myra Norton, Instructor of
Domestic Economy, was standing in
tho salesroom with her back to the
stove, talking ito Miss Wallace. In
some unexplained manner her clothing
took fire and when noticed was burn
ing fiercely. Besides Miss Wallace
there was no one In there at the
tiiriA excent one of the girls. The
Kifht nf ithe fire rendered them so
j- p-5 vf
nervous and excitable and everything
happened so quickly, that she was
f.ntallv burned before they could ren
rfpr anv effective assistance or even
summon heln. After the fire was put
out she was carried to the Infirmary
an! evervthine possible that medical
skill and careful nursing could de
vise was done for her, but all to no
avail. She sank gradually and shortly
before supper expired. Over two
thirds of her body was burned and re
covery, of course, was a matter of Im
possibility. Her people were com
municated with by telegraph and at
their request it he body was buried
here. The floral offerings from the
school, the faculty and student body
were beautiful. Miss Norton was
held in high esteem by all and heT
iintimplv taklne off caused genuine
sorrow and regret. It threw the whole
-: school in gloom.
Tim funeral took place Friday. at 11
o'clock. Slowly and sadly the stu
dent body filed into the beautiful new
memorial chapel, a subdued quietness
prevailed. There was no hum as
usual, buit stillness. The beautiful
service of the Church was read ana
Archdeacon Russell n most feeling
and touching terms referred to the life
and character of the deceased, taking
occasion to press home in their rela
tion to life and death the beautiful and
simple truths of the Bible in a most
impressive manner. The vested choir
sang two beautiful hymns and then
the remains, followed by the faculty,
the whole situdent body and members
of St. Paul Benevolent Society, were
taken to the cemetery. -The choir
siang "Asleep in Jesus," and tenderly
and lovingly her mortal remains were
lowered into the open grave, the com
mitment services read, and amid
audible sobs and tears the last sad of
fices were performed and tho proces
sion returned to the school. The
Southern Missioner (Lawrenceville,
Va.)
Miss II. Myra Norton was for some
time matron at Hoffman Hall, and
subsequently preceptress at Waiden
University.
H. T. G. M. CLUB OBSERVES HAL
LOWE'EN.
Hallowe'en was very fittingly cele
brated with an ait home In honor of
the II. T. G. M., by Miss Georgia A.
Bradford at her residence on Four
teenth avenue, North, last Thursday
evening. The members of the Club
were all appropriately gowned for the
main number of the evening, which
was a Hallowe'en drill. This drill was
executed under the direction ol Mis!
This is the name of a new company
that has been organized and chartered
under the laws of the state within the
past week. The incorporators are all
wide-awake, progressive men wno in
tend to give for the benefit of the col
ored people an annual state ana
county fair. Under the leadership of
Prof. F. G. Smith, the principal of
Pearl High School, and in obedience to
his call seven men met, discussed the
object of the call and went into per
manent organization. Ail agreea xuai
the time was ripe and that the psy
chological moment was at hand when
the colored people should hold a State
Fair of their own.
The purpose of tho organizaition as
set forth in the charter is for the "ad
vnnppmcnt exhibition, exposition and
dissemination of the products' of art
and trade, the farms, and schools of
th colored neonle of Davidson County
and the State of Tennessee. The
company is capitalized at $10,000, di
vided Into 10,000 shares of $1.00 each.
The organizers intend this company
to be a company of the people, and for
that reason have fixed the shares at
$1.00 each, so that the humblest la
borer might take a part in it. Steps
will be taken immediately to give the
first annual Fair some time next
Fall, either In September or October.
The Association Is strictly Negro,
the money invested In it is Negro
money, and Its officers and helpers are
all to be Negroes. No time, labor,
pnprv or money will be spared to
mnke this new enterprise a complete
success. The names- of the incorpo
rators nx familiar to the readers 01
tho Globe and they are persons whose
names inspire success In whatever
thov undertake. The company con
sists of F. G. Smith, J. II. Hale, Hardy
L. Keith, G. E. Washington, A. JN
Johnson, E. B. Jefferson, and II. A
Pnmprnn.
In a short time certificates of stock
will be issued and the sale of shares
placed upon the market. It is, hoped
that the Negro public will rally to the
support of thece men, as they are
giving to the colored people something
1 that ia needed and are trying to devel-
DR. CLARK TO LECTURE AT
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH.
Rev. C. II. Clark, D. D., the popular
mis-tor of Mt. Olive Baptist Church
will lecture at the Flrsit Baptist
Church, Eighth avenue, North, Friday
evening, November 15. Subject: "The
Relation of the Church to the Commu
nity." .
Fanny Taylor Restaurant,
FINE LUNCHES. ( Prompt Attention)
Meals 5, 10, 15 and 25 cents. !
139 fourth fvenii, South jT
Eureka Dancing Class,
OPEN TO THE PUKLKJ IN "V
ODD FELLOWS' HALL
417 FOlllTH AYE., X.
- REGIM D.IKIXG CLASS
every Monday and Friday nights from
8:30 to 9:30. Mr. Doc k l.nu r win giv;
in at ruction a free of clnrue t all wishiin
in lonrn thp now dam rs that .'u e put on.
Good order will he observed Parents
with children admitted free.
DOCK USER, Instructor.
ADMISSION 15 Cents.
f
r1
MARRIAGES.
Tuck Price and Mary Etta Farriss.
Allen Ilaynes and Willie Hutchin
son.
.lames Bowden and Sallie Porter,
l.cn Cheatham and Cora Sneed.
Robert Bell and Eva Hosklns.
Elliott Oden and Mollie lllllins.
Clarence Kirkman and HattieAdam.
John II. Jones anl Emma L. Meri
no v.
David Patton and Mattie Elliott.
Henry J. Bell and Mabel Gentry.
Will Davis and Beatrice Hunter.
Jim Berch and Minnie Taylor.
Henry Buxard and Susie McKissack.
Ed Hunt and Daisy Nix.
R, R, DeGrafenriedi
UP JO-DftTE TAILOR.
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Strict Attention hid to Ladies' Work.
CLEANING, DYEING AND KE-
PAIKING.
430 Cedar St,, Nashville, Tei
DEATHS.
Judio Battle, 310 Twelfth avenue,
North, 70 years.
Stephen Thornton, 408 quarry
Mtroet, 51 years.
Emanuel Maroel, 1014 south street,
1 mnnth.
Mary Mason, 1235 Third avenue,
South. 21 years.
Tahiti TClmomison. 1507 reari
stront f.fi vears.
Emma Bell Williams, 907 Gay street,
1 month.
Marcellus Scott, 405 Eighth avenue,
Vorth. 12 vear&.
Annie Fishback, 1905 Hermosa
street, 16 years.
Jane Peebles, 419 Highland street,
liO years.
Ilcnry Lilian!, 1411 Jackson street,
18 years.
Mollie Wray, 205 Twelfth avenue,
North, 42 years.
Houston Jones, 1427 1-2 Kayne ave
nue. S3 years.
Ada Claybrook3, 120 Foster street,
26 years.
7-12-0$ 1
NEED ANYTHING? CALL OS!
Richard Hill f
NOTARY PUBL1C.J
Pension Vouchers and other impor-
tant papers llxed with prompt-
ness and dispatch. V.
ALL BUSINESS CONFIDENTIAL.
Is your life insured? Is your house f
and furniture insured? Arrn't t
you tired paying rent 1
Oflice Tltonp, Slain ISStl. Home TIihiic "ul 2S12.
O t i l CK 4t O- i V i:i A K S T.f
Xashvllle, - Tennessee.
Wade Hanie. C12 Fourth avenie,
South,, 47 years.
Trma Mitchell. North inn tireei.
2 years.
Joseph lue Wnllon, 135 Lafayette k
. . .

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