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The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, November 22, 1907, Image 3

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Till: NASHVILLE GLOBE Fill DAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1907.
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PROMPT
have iust received from Bankrupt
t & k City 2,000 A
I $ colors. Your choice
k City 2,000 Assorted Trimmed
Worth up
We are going to sell large Black Silk
Ostrich Plumes, cut steel buckle at
Worth
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& Misses and Children's Trimmed Hats at .
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we have just received a consignment
j Skirts and long Black Cloth Coats, silk
$ their value
k
Come to
ROSENHEIM.
THE LARGEST MILLINERY STOCK IN THE CITY.
Diamond Shaped Paper Garlands
BEST AND CHEAPEST DECORATION YET PRODUCED.
View of Garland Partly Open.
No. 5064-H. One of the finest, neatest and most tffective
decorations ever devised. It is made of imported tissue paper of
a dark "Christmas green," and red. Each Garland is twelve feet
long when extended.
They are easy to handle. When closed they occupy little
space. Their extreme lightness reduces transportation charges
to minimum, thereby cheapening cost to the purchaser. After
use they can be quickly closed into compact form and thus readily
preserved for future occasions. The possibilities of this devise
are almost without limit. For decorating churches, schoolrooms,
halls or private residences, these Garlands may be used with the
finest effect, their flexibility permitting the carrying out of many
different ideas.
Price. Each Garland (12 feet in length) 10 cents, by mail,
oreoaid.
f5f One dozen Garlands (144 feet) $1.00, prepaid. In ordering
mention No. 5064-H.
OUR FESTOONING.
Superior to any other material for producing a brilliant decorative effect.
More elegant than real Christmas green and less costly to start with.
Is much cleaner; does not dry up and litter the carpet.
Can be used again and again from year to year for an indefinite period.
One investment will avoid the usual annual expense for Christmas
green.
Beside using for festooning, may be easily made into various
designs monograms, mottoes, letters, figures, etc. jmr
' Three Colors: Solid Green. No. 3049-H; Solid White. No. 3048-H; Red, White M
and Blue. No. 3015-11.
When not otherwise requested, all orders will be filled with
solid green, '
Price, per roll for ten yards, 25 cents, charges prepaid by us.
Owing to the lightness and strength of this festooning, it is easi
ly put into position, and gives a harmonious and beautiful effect,
when wound around letters, ball, and other decorations.
Order Liberally. Nothing else in the line of decorative ma.
terial will give anywhere near the satisfaction for the money jn
vested.
$3.15 nays (or 150 yards (13 rolls), prepaid which will go far towards making a large
church look delightful. , .
NOTE. Ihls festooning being made of light tissue paper,
transportation, but can be quickly restored by passing the roll
should be joined together by tying
the ends with a bit of cord.
SEND ALL
NATIONAL BAPTIST
R. H. BOYD, D.
523 SECOND AVENUE. NORTH,
NON-RESIDENT NOTICE.
(February Rules. 1907.)
ERNEST BARLEY VS. MTTIE
BARLEY.
In this cause it appearing to the
satisfaction of the Court that the de
fendant is a non-resident of the State
of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary
process of law cannot be served upon
' her; it is therefore ordered that said
"defendant enter her appearance herein
at the next term of the Davidson
County Court, to be holdcn at the
Court House In Nashville, Tennessee,
on the 1st Monday in February, it be
ing the , and defend, or said
complainant's bill will be taken for
confessed as to her and set for hear
ing exparte. It is therefore ordered
that a copy of this order be published
for four weeks in succession n the
Nashville Globe, a newspaper pub
lished in Nashville.
L. M. I1ITT, CLERK.
E. R. RUTHERFORD, D. C.
G. F. ANDERSON,
i Solicitor for Complainant.
ATTENTION
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Millinery House in New
Hats, assorted styles and f0 QC
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to $10.00.
Velvet Ilats, trimmed ia d0 QC
yUtVD
$12.50.
50c
of 800 .assorted Drummers Sample
lined. We are selling them at y2
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may be somexnat crusnea in
through the hands. Sections
ORDERS TO
PUBLISHING
BOARD,
D., Secretary,
NASHVILLE, TENN.
NON-RESIDENT NOTICE.
(October Rules 1907.)
KATIE C. STEELE VS. ED L.
STEELE.
Tn this cause it appearing to the
satisfaction of the Court that the de
fendant is a non-resident of the State
of Tennessee, therefore the ordinary
process of law cannot be served upon
him; it is therefore ordered that said
defendant enter his appearance here
in at the next term of the Davidson
County Cirdiit Court, to be holden
at the Court House in Nashville, Ten
nessee, on the 1st Monday in Feb'y.
it boing the 4th, and defend, or said
complainant's bill will be taken for
confessed as to him and set for hear
ing ex parte. It is therefore ordered
that a copy of this order be published
for four weeks in succession in the
X;ushville Globe, a newspaper pub
Trhed in Nashville.
E. R. RUTHERFORD, D. C.
L. M. HITT, Cork.
T. G. Ewlng,
Solicitor for Complainant.
GREAT EFFORT FOR SCHOOLS.
In speaking to a Globe reporter,
Rev. E. M. Lawrence, Superintendent
of Missions for the Baptist of Tennes
see, had the following to say concern
ing that denomination and its efforts
to build and maintain schools for the
education of the colored youth:
"It will be gratifying to every Bap
tist in the State and many of them in
our sister' States to learn of the loyal
ty and constituency of this great de
nomination, so loyal are they that,
many of them have sent in individual
contributions to the mission work,
and are encouraging the leaders to
put on double energy, and thus bring
about the much desired results. The
entire brotherhood has learned that
they are responsible for mission and
educational work in the State of Ten
nessee, which must be done for the
good of the denomination, and it de
pends greatly upon them and they are
falling in line from Carter to Shelby,
anxiously exspecting great results to
the satisfaction of their loyalty. We
hear many of them asking, how much
money are we to raise this Conventional
year? The answer cornea back to them
we must raise ten thousand dollars
for the mission and educational work
this year. With the Alumni of Roger
Williams University, in Nashville,
Tenn., the Alumni of Nelson Merry
College at Jefferson City and the
Alumni of the Howe Institute in Mem
phis and with the many members of
the above named organizations scat
tered over the United States, who have
not forgotten their Alma Mater, and
are full of energy and push, with the
spirit of courage and magnanimity,
the ten thousand dollars can, and must
be raised. There is a splendid oppor
tunity for the three schools. We beg
for the cause a concentration of our
forces in the State and when the great
Convention shall meet in Nashville,
Tenn., Wednesday before the fourth
Sunday in July (for they are coming
up from every quarter,) and the gavel
is sounded by President Wm. Haynes,
there will be a mighty number which
no man can at this time numer
ate with heart, soul and spirit, not to
bicker for office, nor to filibust for
points of order, but to do battle for him
whose majesty is on high, and the
angels bow at His behest.
Rev. J. M. Thompson, the mission
ary in the Eastern division of the
State is working In harmony with
the leaders in that division and says
that he is expecting great things for
the work this year. No Baptist from
any part of the State should excuse
his or herself from the great duty in
which he is involved. The ten thou
sand dollars which will be raised at
the State Convention will be for mis
sions or church work proper, and our
educational work throughout the
State. The three schools will come In
for their pro rata. This is to my way
of thinking, a favorable opportunity
for the three above named schools to
push their claims for the work they
are doing.
"Rev. Wm. Collier, the missionary
for the Western division of the State,
is visiting many churches, which
should make it possible for great re
sults in favor of success this conven
tional year. Let us harness our forces
in our churches and Sunday schools
and see to it that nothing gets be
tween us and success; put the profes
sional grumbler, the high-tone, sound
ing brass and tinkling cymbals behind
us, and let us go on to success.
"We, the Board, must congratulate
the many churches, Sunday schools
and auxiliaries for their punctual re
sponds to our appeals. We are look
ing for many others to fall in line.
"Last Friday, Saturday and Sunday,
Nov. 8, J) and 10 we held a successful
institute at' Antioch Baptist Church,
Turnerville, Tenn. Collection, $14.95."
MARRIAGES.
Carl Fuller and Musie Burrs.
John H. Peaks and Ola Cecil.
Wm. Bryant and Ida Cecil.
Noble C. Shelton and Lizzie Por
ter. Andrew Silvers and Emma Smith.
Ed Henley and Miss Mamie Mc
Keiver. James Clark and Addie Poindex
ter. Wm. Douglass and Selene Thorn
ton. Ed Phillips and Susie A. Green.
Richard Gordan and Georgia Grif
fin. Porter Hays and Dora Smith.
W. II. Davis and Florence Kirk.
Nathan Craig and Ilaltie Wood
folk. Joe Miller and Louise Mosely.
Fred Hunter and Annie Smothers.
Charley Allison and' Alice Martin.
John Barfield and Maggie Buchan
an. Wm. Henry McClain and Ella Cur
ran. Nelson Gooch and Delia Spratt.
Clarence Bell and Fannie V. Hart.
DEATHS.
Infants of J. II. and Sallie Brown.
57 Maple street.
Fannie White, Sll Fourth avenue,
39 years.
Hattie Slater, Third street, West
Nashville, 39 years.
Alice Hale, Eighth and Williams
street. 2S years
Victoria Fort, 613 Eighth avenue,
South. 21 years.
Annie Leek, Fern and Twenty-first
street. C5 years.
Berdie Smalt, S5 Green street, s
months.
Infant of Alice and Dee Steward,
714 South Seventh street.
Willie Paesly, 1110 Jackson street.
20 years.
Marcrett Grant, 1218 Twelfth av
enue, South. 74 years.
Robert Jackson, 1005 Haslain street.
72 years.
William Olivers, infant, 520 Fourth
avenue, South.
Jane Gurley, 10 Liberty street. 54
years.
Harry Thompson, Antioch, Tenn.,
20 years.
Ella Elliott, 209 Third avenue,
South. 42 years.
James William Wiles. 1225 Second
avenue, South. 58 years.
Anthony Brown, Rains Spring. 20
years.
Mary Nolen, 431 Chestnut street.
04 years.
John Harris, 1107 Milsom avenue.
3S years.
Henry White, 901 Third avenue,
North. 08 years.
Rachel Buchanan, 1110 Pearl street.
53 years.
Bettle Brown, Fourth avenue and
Denionbreun street. 23 years.
Charley Rowland, 132 Fifth av
enue, South. 45 years.
Manstield Edward Burns, Gallatin
Pike. 5 months.
Milverda Webb, 413 Fourteenth av
enue, North. 13 years.
CHURCH DEDICATION.
Next Sunday the Rt. Rev. Dr. T. T.
Gailor, Bishop of Tennessee, will dedl
cate to the use of the colored people
of Nashville Holy Trinity Church, on
the corner of Sixth 'end Ewing ave
nues. The services, which will begin
at 8 p. m., will consist of evening
prayer .and confirmation, with a ser
mon by the Bishop. At the offertory
1 silver communion service, given by
Mrs. Farrar Foster, will be presented,
and consecrated by the Bishop.
Trinity Church is considered by
many people the most beautiful church
building in Nashville. It is built of
stone in the English Gothic Early
English style, and cost $32,000. It
is said to be a reproduction, with some
modifications, of a church built in
iCngland some thousand years ago.
This is the third large gift donated
by the Episcopal Church for the uplift
of the colored people in Nashville.
Hoffman Hall, with St. Mary's Hall
and the Warden's Cottage, which were
built subsequently, cost $2G,O00. The
church at the cornier of Gay stret and
Eighth avenue, now occupied by the
Presbvterlans. was built through the
exertions of Bishop Gray, then rector
of the Church of the Advent. He
raised the money from his friends
c-ivinsr personal notes for the balance
still due when the church was opened.
Now. next Sunday we enter into a
third inheritance, which the anxiety
of the Episcopal Church for our wel
fare has provided.
The Bishop of Tennesse will visit
Holy Trinity Church Sunday, Novem
ber 24, at 8 o'clock for the apostolic
rite of confirmation.'
SALEM SUNDAY SCHOOL.
In behalf of the Sunday school of
Salem A. M. E. Church, we, the teach
ers, beg to urge the parents to send
their children to Sunday school, and
send them on time. Sunday school
opens at 9:30 o'clock. Children
should not be any later than 10
o'clock.
After this hour they do not de
rive the benefit they should. We
are striving to build up our Sunday
school and children likewise. Trust
ing you will take heed in the time of
need, we are your humble servants:
W. II. Shelby, Superintendent; J. R.
Robinson, Assistant Superintendent;
Miss 'Martha Stratton, Secretary; Mrs.
Martha Turner, Organist:
INSTALLATION AT HARDING
1 HALL.
Mr. M. II. Freeman, Supremo Grand
Master of Knights of Golden Links,
organized and installed the officeirs
of Friendship Council No. 10 at Harding
Hall, Monday night, November 18, in
the presence of a Irrge audience. The
following officers were installed: Al
ford Wright, P. P.; Rev. G. J. Stand
ford, N. P.; Joseph Lane, V. P.; Rev.
M. C. Davis, Chaplain; Alford Blake
liore, F. S.; George II. Burrus, Treas
urer; James Lilian!, W. S.; T. II.
Rankins, C. G.; Sol. Driver, C. P.;
Thomas Allen, A. P.; Messrs. James
A. Davis, M. D. Dwiggins and Wm.
Gooch, trustees.
After a few remarks by the Su
preme Grand Master, Rev. G. J. Stand
ford made a lengthy address setting
forth the plans of the organization.
Mr. James A. Davis addressed the
audience in a few remarks very fitting
for the occasion. Several members of
the Lodge made interesting addressee.
Refreshments were bountifully served
by the ladies of the Order.
The regular meeting nights will be
held the second and fourth Wednesday
nights of each month.
VEKM KINDEIWAUTEN.
MISS MATTIE F. MATTHEWS,
PRINCIPAL.
St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church.
Corner Eighth avenue, North and
Gay street.
A Christian school, though unde
nominational, where every attention is
given to intellectual development,
moral training and social culture.
Particular attention given to the
study of the books and parts of the
Bible, Arithmetic, Reading, Spelling,
Writing, Drawing, Vocal and Instru
mental Music.
This school Is a high-class prepara
tory school for children 4 years old
and up.
Third term begins Wednesday,, Sept.
11, 1907. Tuition, 50 cents per month
(in advance). Pupils enter any time.
For Information address
MISS MATTIE F. MATTHEWS.
440 Eighth avenue, North.
8-2-07-lyr
inn 11 1 m a a
Dry Goods and Garpet Go,
Third Avenue, between Union Street
and Public Square.
Carry tlie Best Stock ol Carpets,
The Best Assortment ol Silks and
Dress Goods,
The Handsomest Line o! Cloaks
and Suits.
Eureka Dancing Glass
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC IN
ODD FELLOWS' HALL
417 FOI UTH AlK., s.
sr REGIIIR D1KIM CLASS
every Monday and Friday nights from
8:30 to 9:30. Mr. Dock Liner will give
instructions free of charge to all wishing
to learn the new dances that are put on.
Good order will Le observed Parents
with children admitted free.
DOCK LIJER, Instructor.
ADMISSION 15 Cents.
Pi, Pi, DeGrafenried,
UP-TO-DATE TAILOR,
SUITS 3IADK TO ORDER.
Strict II (imiI inn Taiil to Ladies' Work.
CLEAN! NO, DYKINU AM) I! IM
PAIRING. 430 Cedar St., Nashville, Tenn,
7- 2-u8-tf
w NEED ANYTHING? CALL ON! "
Richard
NOTARY PUBLIC.
Pension Vouchers and other impor
tant papers fixed with prompt
ness and dispatrh.
ALL BUSINESS CONFIDENTIAL.
Is your life insured? Is your house
and furniture insured? Aren't
you tired paying rent?
Oriirc 'Phone, Main 1SS9. l!o:::e 'w .Haiti 2SI2.
officj: 1 10-2 vr.itAn sr.,
-Xushi'ilte, - Tennessee,
NOTICE!
The well known COAL DKALI-R,
JAMKS McGOODIv, is delivering coal
daily wholesale. Come at once ami ivc
me your order for the winter. Office,
409 Kahili Avenue, North.
POSTPONEMENT.
Tlio Coiivoc-itinn of Colored Work
ers of tlio Protestant Kiuscopnl Church
of Tennessee, which was planned to
meet at Holy Trinity Church on Sun
day, ?ltli inst is postponed to Sun
day, Deemher 22,
Hi!
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