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The Nashville globe. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1906-193?, December 13, 1907, Image 1

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'All things ccine to them tfctt viit. profldlng thej tcstlf Ue Uvaj fiJt" CfcarJa W. lsdrion. "Get out of our sunshls K. ; i. 3cyd.
Vol. II.
NASHVILLE. TENN.. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13. 1907.
No. 49.
T IT A T 17 TTTT TTTT
&.x a i-
JLL i-L
MASONIC LODGE
OF MISSISSIPPI
Meets In Annual Session In
Hattiesburg.
REV. E. W. LAMPTON PRESIDES
OVER MEETING.
OVER ONE THOUSAND MEN AT
TEND THE GRAND LODGE-HON.
E. E. PERKINS, SECRETARY AND
TREASURER, MAKES GOOD RE
PORTPLAN ON FOOT TO ES
TABLISH WIDOW AND ORPHAN
HOME $166,550.10
DURING YEAR.
COLLECTED
Hattiesburg, Miss., Dec. 7. Peihaps
no time in the history of Hattiesburg
were there so many representative
men in the city as were here during
the past week attending the ihirty
eecond annual communication of the
Stringer Grand Lodge of Masons for
the state, which was presided over by
Rev. E. V. Lampton, D. D., of Greenville,
Miss., who is also financial secretary
of the African Methodist Episcopal,
and one of the most remarkable men
of the race.
The Grand Lodge brought to the city
over a thousand men from all parts
of the state, and there was not a word
of disorder on the streets. These race
advocates attracted much attention
and favorable comments from all of
the citizens of Hattesburg.
The Grand Lodge opened Tuesday
morning at 10 o'clock with addresses
of welcome. The addresses and re
sponse were delivered by R. L. Hand,
P. S. Golden. C. S. Collard, IT. U.
Clark, J. L. Collins, Mrs. Susan Price,
E. E. Pettibone, Mrs. Emma Fettus,
Mrs. E. E. Pettibone and Prof. George
L. Olliver.
Prof. L. J. Rowan, president of Al
corn A. & M. College, Alcorn, Miss.,
was introduced, and delivered an ad
dress. His mission was to see and hear,
and study the progress of his race. He
declared that he was greatly inspired
at seeing iso many able men of the
race.
"I trust that you will accosnplish
much for God and the race," he said,
"and you will inspire our boys and
girls to see the higher things in life.
I am giving my life for the prepara
tion of the youth of our race. We
have a largo number of young people
preparing to go out into the world. I
will not take up your time with a long
speech."
Prof. V. I. Mitchell, principal of the
high school of Columbus, Miss., re
sponded tot he address. His address
along a practical line was attentively
listened to by his audience.
The visitors at this point who were
not members of the fraternity were
permitted to withdraw, and a lodge of
masiter masons was opened in due
form, and after ascertaining that a
constitutional number was present,
the Grand Master proceeded to open
the Grand Lodge for business. He
after the opening ceremonies appoint
ed a committee on credentials. At
this point the Grand Master announced
tho death of R. W., J. L. Riley, the
grand junior warden, and the grand
lodge was called off for 10 (minutes
as a token of respect.
When the grand lodge assumed
business Dr. Fi. W. Lampton delivered
his annual address, which was con
sidered a literary gem. He took up
masonry from its oddn and traced
down to the present time, giving some
valuable data on the organization of
masonry .in .this country among the
colored people.
"Taking on tho true spirit of Free
masonry, wo must nttemnt m-
things for God," snid Dr. Lampton,
.' inu. ne snm-mcd with simple du
ties.
ll wo look through the Bible
history, we find Ood commanding his
children to do what seamed Impos
sible Mo-os to RO down in Egvpt,
Abraham to leave home, Peter' to
launch out into the deep."
The address was referred to com
mittee on Grand Master's address A
number of committees were an
nounced. The ev ning was spent in a. grand
lodge of .sorrow, at. which time the
grand orator, Prof. W. Phillips, (i0.
livered a meniorinl address. Follow
ing this some business was tranacted
after calling off for ten minutes.
1 ''''''
DAN JIAiCKLEY
Recently Engaged by the National
a Volume
In the second day's session the
grand lodge got down to business, and
after some time the following officers
were elected: M. W., E. W. Lamp-
ton, D. D., grand master; W. A. J. Mor
gan, of Shelby, deputy grand master;
H. F. I acy, of Shiloh, grand senior
warden; W. W. Phillips, Kosciusko,
rand Junior warden; G. S. Goodman,
rf Holly Springs, grand Hecrelary;
I. J. Wilson, of Meridian, grand
treasurer; E. E. Perkins, of EdwardSj
secretary and treasurer of the Ma
sonic Benefit Association.
The featurerof tho session was the
report of Hon. E. E. Perkins, of Ed
wards, Secretary and Treasurer of the
Masonic Benefit Association. In his
introductory remarks he said he had
guarded with a vigilant eye tho inter
ests of the widows and orphans, and
it was inded gratifying to see how the
Negroes were putting forth an effort
to provide for their widows and or
phans, and through the Order of the
Eastern Star, orphans and husbands
were provided for, and in the case of
the death of the another and father
belonging to the Fraternity the or
phans received $1,200, which was a
good start. Ho reported that tho
Grand Lodge had purchased 1,000 acres
of land in the Delta, which was now
worth $10..0i)i). The receipts for the
department during the past twelve
months had been $1GG,CS0.10, and had
paid to widows and orphans $117,
ir.0.27, and there was a balance on
hand of $48,919.83.
Resolutions thanking the Secretary
were passed. In addition to holding
the position, Mr. Perkins is postmas
ter at Edwards and has held the po
sition for a number of years. He is
one of the most prominent Negroes in
the State.
GARY'S GRAND GROCERY TO THE
FRONT.
The Negro business men of Nash
ville are awakening to the needs of
the people. The latest to come for
ward with a relief to those who often
find themselves in the city and in
want of a nourishment is the Gary's
Grand Grocery.
Realizing the fact that the appetites
of people vary as other things, they
have opened in connection with thtir
large grocery business a lunch par
lor, where one can he served to light
lunchis and soups at any hour. They
do not claim to be running a restau
rant, 1 i:t they uo claim to be able to
satisfy that demand for choice lunch
es that has been so long felt among
our po; h in Nashville. Mrs, Gary is
conceded to he authority in the prepa
ration of consomme, and the conten
tion is attested to by a Globe repre
sentative who recently stopped in at
Gary's Grand Groceiy and was served
to one of their lunches.
Gary's Grand Grocery is the pridf
of the Negroes of NashvilK 1 hey
keep everything that is best, and al
ways simply their custouii'is with
fresh goods. Mr. Gary believes in
meding the needs of the people in
every way.
y
WINSTON.
Baptist Publishing Board to Prepare
of Poems.
FLEUR-DE-LIS
ART CLUB
Holds Interesting Meeting
On December Fifth.
MISSIONARY WORK DISCUSSED
AT LENGTH.
ONE INMATE CARED FOR AT THE
DAY HOME PLANNING TO GIVE
FOOD SHOWER, CHRISTMAS, TO
THE CHILDREN IN THAT INSTI
TUTION PROMINENT LADIES
GUESTS OF HONOR.
Tho Fleur de Lis Art Club was most
beaut If nil v entertained at the resi
dence of its President, Mrs. Sutton E.
Griggs, on December 5. But for three
ab.-ientces only the club roll was per
feet. The invited guests included Mew-
dames William Flagg, Frank G. Smith,
G. II. Bandv and Miss Belma Mahan.
Tho program for the afternoon was in
deed enjoyable. Airs. D. A. Hart ren
dered a solo in a very pleasing man
ner; her sweet voice always brings
cheer, and she delights her hearers
with the excellency of hor selc
lions. Mrs. Price gave an inter
-ting paper on tho "Latest Books
and Their Authors." Tho man
ner in which she handled her subject
showed that she spends a part of her
valuable time in reading good bookd
and weighing their thoughts. The
Journalist, as is her custom, read sev
oral very interesting items, but owing
to the lateness of the hour they were
not disicus'sed, although highly en
ioyed. Mrs. Townsend expressed her
heartfelt gratitude to the club for their
interest in the "Day Home," and at
the close of the meeting was made to
feel that she has still the hearty co
operation or this club and many
friends outside the club. The club
not only paid $1.25 for the child for
whom they are caring, but one of the
invited guests contributed 25 cents;
ilso a promise of clothes from Mes
dames Harris, Work and A. N. John
son was made. Mrs. Bostic isiwke
along the line of making our child at
"Home" a Chrlrtmas present, which
wis broadened to a "Food Shower" for
lie Home, wnich will be enjoyed by
uoie than one child. The visiting
'nd'es all asked permission to con
'r'brto with the club on the day of
tVo "Food Shower," which will take
at the lvxt meeting on Decern
' cr 19. The club will appreciate do
'vtions from any person. Friends de
siring to take part in this shower will
nle's? wnd their contributions, money
or food, to the following ladies, and
they will carry them in to the Club:
Mrs. S. E. Griggs, 610 Webster
street
Mrs. A. M. Townsend, 614 Webster
street.
Mrs. H. A. Cameron, 1025 Eighteenth
avenue, North.
Mrs. S. P. Harris, 1730 Jefferson.
Mrs. D. A. Hart, 1726 Jefferson.
Mrs. J. B. Singleton, 1116 Jefferson.
Mrs, C. O. Hartley, 1506 Phillips.
Mrs. R. P. Moore, 1C05 State street.
Mrs. J. W. Bostic, 805 Seventeenth
avenue.
Mrs. J. W. Work, 1607 Harding.
Mrs. W. B. Vassar, 11. ID Jefferson.
Mrs. W. It. Baker, 1504 Fourteenth
avenue
Mrs. Arthur Price, 1732 Jefferson.
Mrs. A. N. Johnson, Undertaking Es
tablishment, Cedar street.
Mrs. Lewis, 1305 Demonbreun
street.
After these discussions, etc., the
hostess cordially welcomed the ladies
nto the dining-room. Here an elaborate
four-course collation was enjoyed. The
color scheme of tho dining-room was
red and green, which was quite in or
der for holiday colors and the season
of the year. Most truly the leaves
have taken off their solid green dresses
or trimmed them with red. A very
striking picture was the table spread
with a pretty hemstitched cloth with
red and green candles and shades.
rho tall vase of dark red roses amid
the ferns, upon a centerpiece whlcn
was the handiwork of the hostess, was
charming.
Each of the visiting ladies made
nice ta.lks, as did nev. . hi. itriggs,
who came in. in time to partake of the
hospitality of the hostess. It was de-.
cided that the F. D. L.'s would not
join the Confederation of Ladies'
Clubs, since their number of members
s so limited. The Journalist an
nounced the following program for tn-j
next meeting, which will be with Mrs.
O. Hartley, 1500 Phillips street, De-
comber 19, 1907, from 3 to 5 p. m.
Solo Mrs. Ross Moore
low to Spend Christmas 'Discus
sion By Club
n?itrum?ntal Solo .Mrd. Hartley
The club th adjourned, carryLng
with theui Souvenir Cards tied with
baby ribbons red and green, and in
scribed with quotations on "Women"
to be recited by each member at the
next meeting.
CANTATA AT FISK DURING
THE
HOLIDAYS.
There is now in process of prepara
tion a cantata of Negro Polk songs,
which is to be rendered during ine
Xmas holidays, at Fisk University.
'rof. J. W. Work has been planning
the material for five or six years and
has at last found an interesting story
of Negro slave life, and also folk
songs that tell this story. The differ
ent parts of the story were gathered
from those who were slaves and could
tell them authoritatively, among whom
is Mrs. George W. Moore, who was
inown among the original Fisk Jubi
lee singers as "Ella Slieppard." The
cantata includes the old favoiites.
"Kfrml Avi-nv in Toanc "Svvi'n-r 1 .nvv
Sweet Chariot," "Couldn't Hear No
body Pray," "Bright Sparkles in the
Church Yard," and the like. The or
igin of some of these songs, which
alone would make an interesting story.
is also dealt with. A very interest ine
feature Is the arrangement, also the
harmony of the songs wrought out by
Mr. F. J. Work, who is co-laboring
with his brother. He has spent about
a year in working out tin's part, and
has accomplished some pleasing as
well as some striking effects. Mr,
Work has recently studi?d harmony
with Clough Leighter, in Boston
Among the songs is one original
chorus, composed on the principles of
Ihe Folk songs, by Mr. F. J. WorK.
Another interesting feature is that
Mrs. Preston laylor, known among
the original Jubilee Fingers, as "Georgia-
Gorden," is to assist in the ren
dition of this work.
Among the others who are to take
part is the company who reprrs ntec
Fisk at the Jamestown Exposition, se
curing a goiu meuai. aim smging in
the East Room at the While House
for the President and his guests. Mrs
.Mabel liadley who traveled with I. hi
last company of Jubilee Singers, who
toureo the country in the interest of
Fisk, and Mrs. Louisa Cameron, for
a long time conrected with the musk
of Fisk.
The Cantata consists of solos, duet
(horus's and ohligatos with chorus
a'( ompaniments. Mr. Fred J. Worl
v ill be at the piano.
The
Poard
otfee
lands
National Biptiy-t Publishin
has on exhibition at the Globt
ome ot its mnmonu-snapca gar
:ind festooning. Christmas and
New Year bells. If you cannot call at
tho Publishing Iloue, pass by the
Globe office.
PASSING OF A
POETIC GENIUS.
Uncle" Peter Dent Dies
At a Good Old Age.
LIVED TO ENJOY THE BENEFITS
OF THIS WORLD 104 YEARS.
CORN IN VIRGINIA, 1803-BROUGHT
TO TENNESSEE WHEN FOUR.
TEEN YEARS OLD SPENT NINE
TY YEARS IN VICINITY OF DICK
SON REMARKABLE MAN IN
MANY RESPECTS A POET
BORN, NOT MADE WROTE BY
INSPIRATION.
"Uncle" Peter Dint, aa he was fa
miliarly known, died recently at Dick
son, Tenn., at the advanced age of 104
years. He was born in Virginia in
1S03, but was brought to Tennessee by
his master when 11 years of age. He
remained practically in the same lo
cality, in and around Dickson, for
90 years. He was a poet by nature.
The Muse of poetry dealt kindly with
Ihis untutored child of song, as is evi
dence by the beautiful lays he aflj
along the way and through the yeara
of his long earthly pilgrimage. His
verse possesses a depth of thought
and construction that are truly ro
markable for an uneducated mind.
There is that rhythm to his sons
that arouses the deepest emotions;
there is that musical harmony that
sinss itKPlf into the soul and steals
-ns sympathies for the tunger ere one
is aware; there is that pathos that soft
ens the heart and fills it with hnt ru
ow-feeling which makes the whole
world akin. SomeOne has said thnt
octs are born, not made; if tbra Is
true, then "Uncle" Peter was a poet
horn, and sang only as the Muse havo
rim Inspiration or the lyre of his soul
was touched to music bv untin Ua.
erg of angel hands,
"Uncle" Peter Denl was A remark-
ible old man, a diamond in the ronzh.
whose soul ever and anon would hnrcf
forth into melody as sweetly ad and
nlaintive as is found in the following
nathetic lines:
'Oh, mortal one, do pity mo.
I'm old and weak and poor;
My days on earth are drawing nlch
When I shall beg no more.
'God snids me in this humble wn v
I know not why 'tis so.
only know that where He wills
My weary feet must go.
I know that Jesus led the way
To Calvary's thorny crown;
know that I must follow these
Though sorrow weighs me down.
Perhaps God gives the wretched here
That he the faith may nroe
Of favored ones who seek His love
And 'round His altaas move.
'So give, I pray, what you can spare
I'm old and weak and poor;
My days are drawing to a close
When I shall ask no more "
Like the swan that sings its sweet
t song ere it dies, so did "Uncle"
prter sing the above lay, one of his?
Ist and sweetest, to his latest breath,
then passed to silence and pathetic
dust.
TVse few lines are but a feeble trib
ate to the memory of the humble sing
er w hoso body lies in its window less
alar,e of rert. while his disemhoflit d
-onl, lrt us ho-r, is sinning nrw
iTins of joy in the Flysian Realm of
'he bright Bevond.
MR. SULLIVAN, OF ALABAMA.
Mr. T. L'O. Sullivan, a representa
Mve young merchant of Fclma, Ala.,
Mi l sen of Mr. II. B. Sullivan, the plo
'leer undertaker of the race In that
fate, paid Hon. A. N. Johnson a busl-nrr-s
call Monday, p u ticwlarlr inspect
ing the line of carriages and funeral
rs with a view to making additions
o their husint'i-s. While here he
th'cd through Mr. Johnson an order
n the Cunningham Company for "'a
"t,c- landau, lie paid a short visit to
'i:s cousin, Dr. Farl Harris, at Me
'nriy, ami the Misses CintU, at Fisk.
Mr. Fd. Fwiiu
Chicken pike.
continues ill on

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