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The San Francisco call and post. (San Francisco, Calif.) 1913-1929, December 11, 1913, Image 6

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A Man May Win a Dozen Battles, But When He Loses One He Gets the Once Over
CALL'S DOUBLE PAGE OF SPORTS
HOWARD TO
GO AFTER
OVERALL
Del Expects to Lead Big Jeff
Gently Back Into the
Fold
JOE MURPHY
On next Saturday Del Howard of
the Seals goes south for the express
purpose of seeing Ovie Overall, the
Seals' giant pitcher, and learn from
him definitely whether he Is going to
Join the club next season. Howard
does not for a moment doubt that
Overall will be with the local club,
but he simply wants to get the big
fellows' word for lt, so he can an
nounce it to the anxious fans, who
seem to be more worried about big
Jeff than Howard just what Overall
intends to do.
There has been a noticeable change
In Overall's attitude since President
Al Baum interviewed him at Los An
geles, and the newspaper writers and
fans of the south declare that Overall
surely will be back with the San Fran
cisco club next season. In fact. Over
all made a statement recently in
which he said that his position with
the Maier Brewing company would
expire in March and that he would be
ready to go back to the national pas
time.
It is taken for granted that Overall
means that he will be ready to join
the San Francisco club, with which he
is under contract.
Howard missed Overall when he
dropped off in the south recently on
his way home from the east. Overall
had gone to Visalia to visit his folks
and Howard did not see him.
* ♦ *
An eastern paper prints a story
that Catcher Peaches Graham will be
with the Venice Tigers next season.
Graham was a former big league star.
He has been playing with Joe Kelly s
Toronto team for the last few years.
. Out this way the fans have never
heard that Hogan was after Graham.
Hap has been looking for a high class
catcher, but the name of Graham was
not mentioned. He tried to get
Grover Land, but the Toledo club
would not release him.
# * *
Another big booster for Buck
Weaver is Pietro Daley of the famous
Athletics who was formerly a mem
ber of the Ix>s Angeles club. Daley
is telling his friends in the south that
Weaver is the greatest shortstop that
ever cavorted around the territory be
tween second and third bases. He
even declares that Buck has not
reached the height of his form and
looks for him to be the marvel of the
game in a couple of years.
Arthur Devlin is having; his trou
bles in getting rid of Mltze. It is not
that he can not find a club that would
take the catcher, but Devlin realises
that Honus is one of the best minor
league catchers in the game and he
■wants something in exchange for him.
H' does not seem to be satisfied with
what the eastern baseball managers
want to give up for Mltze.
#'».'«
In the contracts which Hap Hogan
of the Venice club is drawing up for
his baseball players to sign he has
a provisional clause in them, stating
that their Job depends upon whether
they make gocd or not.
* * *
The report that Manager Del How
ard planned to release Cack Henley
this season seems to be without foun
dation. The big fellow will undoubt
e'llv get another chance, as J. Cal
Ewing thinks that Cack has a lot of
left in him. and that he will
surely make good in the Seals' new
ball park.
It is true that Cack lost many a
ball game at Recreation park last
season by an opposing batter lifting
the ball over the right field fence.
Many of these four base swats would
have been easy outs on a regular ball
Held.
* * ♦
Middleton. the outfielder the Oaks
secured from the Western league Is
being touted as a batting wonder.
He must be some hitter, as he finished
with a record of 360 for the aeason.
He is almost sure of an outfield posi
tion with the Oakland club. The same
may be said of Zacher. He is a fix
ture for the center field Job. Coy will
have to put up a fight for a position.
Coy is not expected to prove as ef
fective with the stick next season, as
be will not have the short right field
fence of Recreation park to bat
against. It was his meat to rap the
ball over the right field boards, and
be was a real 300 batter in the Recre
ation park lot.
* * »
Del Howard has announced that he
has put in a requisition for Jimmy
Johnston if he does not make good
in the major league. There is little
consolation for the fans in this an
nouncement, as few of the patrons of
the game expect to see Jimmy back in
the minors for many a day. He 1* up
there to stay, is the general opinion.
If Johnston gets half a chance he will
make good. He is not the best fielder
in the world, but he will hit well
enough and his base running will un
doubtedly make the big leaguers open
their eyes.
Champion Kilbane
Draws Color Line
Champion Johnny Kllbane has
drawn the color line definitely and
finally. That's the significance of
his'refusal to meet either of a pair
of opponents that were suggested to
him for the six round bout that he
has agreed to fight December 10 In
Philadelphia. Both boys are colored.
At the time he turned them down
us opponent* it was given out that
Manager Jimmie Dunn sent word
back to Philadelphia that one of the
lads was overweight and that the
other didn't have sufficient reputa
tion to be stacked up against
Johnny. But those were not John
ny's reasons; the color line is the
real answer.
eKlther lad would have furnished
Xilbane with any particular test of
mettle, so he Is not drawing the
color line as many battlers have done
to furnish themselves with an ex
cuse to prevent meeting a dangerous
rival. Kllbane is drawing the line
because he announces he is opposed
to b-oxing matches between the races.
They All Got in on This One
RITCHIE GETS A FEW
LESSONS IN BOXING
FROM ARTFUL PACKEY
This is the ninth of the series of the life and battles of
Lightweight Champion Willie Ritchie, written exclusively for
The Call.
WILLIE RITCHIE
Packcy McFarland landed in San Francisco right after I beat Jack
Britton. He had heard something about me, and he sent for me to act
as his sparring partner. He heard that I had been coming to the
front, and I guess that he figured I Would be a good boy to help him
out in his training camp, for all fighters know that good sparring
partners are generally scarce.
I was just tickled to death to get this chance to go on with Packey,
who, by the way. was then getting ready for Tommy Murphy. He
was quartered down at Milieu's, and I remember the first day that I
showed up there I put on the gloves with him and we stepped four
speedy rounds.
I will take my hat off to McFarland for being a wonderful boxer,
and I sure did learn many a trick from him. He was nice to me and he
would take me to one side and tell me a few things. But I knew
that he never figured then that I would be the lightweight champion of
the world some day. Two years make a lot of difference, especially in
the fighting game.
We used to put up some good fights, Packey and I. He would
cut loose on me and I would tear at him. I don't know just how much
he weighed then, but I am sure that he had a few pounds on me, and
I scaled around the 136 pound mark, for I had no match in sight and
I was not trying to reduce. I wanted to have something to work on
all the time.
takes McFarland's wallops
I soon discovered that McFarland was a wonderful boxer and
ring general, but his punches did not carry any sting to them. Now,
I don't want to intimate that Packey is not a hard puncher, because he
might have been holding back all the time. However, he never shook
me up at all. and I got so that I was able to stand right up and slug
with him without being set back.
I never will forget that Wednesday afternoon, the day before
Thanksgiving two years ago. Packey had finished up his work for
Murphy on the following day, and there was nothing to do. The
papers came out with an extra, announcing that Ad Wolgast was ill
with appendicitis and that he would not be able to fight Freddie Welsh
in Los Angeles on the following day.
I scratched my head for a moment, looked at the paper again, and
then began to do some very tall thinking. Then I declared myself.
"I'm going down to Los Angeles and take a chance at getting on
with Welsh," I said to my brother and Packey. "They can't stop me
for trying, anyhow."
"I think you're foolish, Willie," cut in Packey. "They will only
laugh at you. They want a fighter with a reputation against Welsh,
and, besides, you have not got any time to get ready. Take my advice
and stay right here."
But I made up my mind to go after the Britisher at any cost. The
first thing I did was to shoot a wire to Tom McCarey. I waited for
an answer, but got none; but still I was not ready to quit.
MEETS KYNE IN LOS ANGELES
I grabbed a suitcase, threw a few things into it. bought two
tickets —one for my brother and one for myself—and by 5 o'clock that
evening we were on the Lark bound for Los Angeles. The next after
noon I was in Vernon ring, giving Welsh the fight of his lifetime; but
there are a few things that I would like to say before I come to the
actual battle.
My brother and myself landed in Los Angeles strangers. We
looked around the station for a minute and, to our delight, we spotted
Billy Kyne, the San Francisco promoter, who gave me several four
round matches.
Well, it sure looked good to find one friend in a strange land.
Kyne took hold of us right away and rushed us up to McCarey's office,
but he was out.
We stalled around for a while, looking for McCarey, but we could
not get a line on him. Everybody was talking about Wolgast and his
illness, and they seemed to take it for granted that McCarey would not
even put on a substitute. But we heard that he was going through
with his preliminary bouts, so we decided to take a run out to the
Vernon arena.
Kyne introduced me to McCarey, and we sat in one of the back
seats near the bleachers and began to talk business. I told McCarey
right oft* the reel that I wanted $1,000. I also told him that I had a
chance to win and become a big card, and I promised him that I would
reward him in the future if he put me on, for I felt sure that I would
make a great showing.
But McCarey would not listen to me at all. He was nearly stag
gered when I asked for $1,000. I don't know just what he offered me,
but I know that it was not much more than I was in the habit of
getting in the four round game.
The next installment of the life of the lightweight cham
pion will appear in Saturday s Call.
Griffiith Is Peeved
At Walter Johnson
Clark Griffith does not approve of
his pitchers doing any work in the
winter, such as playing in exhibition
games. The Washington manager
also states that theg reat pitcher
used poor judgment when he went at
full speed against the" New York
Giants. Here is what Griffith has to
say on the subject:
"1 am very much surpriser to hear
that Johnson has been pitching at top
speed in games in the west sine* the
season closed," said Griffith. "It
seems to me that he should appre
ciate the effort I made last season to
keep from overworking him. Ha has
a wonderful arm, no doubt, but there
is a limit to everything, and by
pitching these games he is not treat
ing himself or the club as he should.
"I know from experience that it
does a pitcher no good to work after
the season is over. It shortens his
career, and I shall have an under
standing with my pitchers in the fu
ture on this question.-
Suits and Overcoats
for the Holidays
We are in receipt of new lines for the Holidays.
In Men's Suits—the new Black and White
effects. Hair Line Stripes and new mixtures.
In Overcoats — Shawl Collar, Chinchilla,
Three-Quarter Length, Belted Back Coats, etc.
Prices $15 to $45.
Hastings Clothing Co.
Post and Grant Avenue
Football a Good
Box Office Game
BLOOMINGTON, Ind.,
Dec. 11.—Indiana uni
versity football team made
nearly $14,000 during the last
season, according to the re
port of the treasurer of the
Athletic association, which
was made public today. The
report shows the actual re
ceipts were $13,926, which is
more than has been made in
previous years.
ARMY-NAVY BOYS
AFTER HONORS
ON COURTS
The annual basket ball champion
ships of the army and navy have at
tracted 17 of the best teams from the
various posts around the bay. The
teams have been divided into two" di
visions in order that the series can
be played off as quickly as possible.
The winners of the two divisions
will later come together in the final
game for the championship title. Sec
retary R. E. Wilson of the Presidio
T. M. C. A., who has charge of the
tournament, has announced that the
flrst game* will be played Saturday.
The teams entered as as follows:
DIVISION A
Sixty sixth company. C. A. C—McOrea.
Barnes, Green. N>gan. Smart. (hilders, Mere
dith, Mess. Hobhroff. I.annnin.
Company 1., sixth infantry—Rahn, Howard,
Hall. Cameron. Stetner. Cornwell. Jackson,
Danders. Green, Sullivan.
Company M. Sixteenth infantry— Ridick,
Piatt. Carpenter, Gaplnakl. Harris, Krob, Rob
insoo, Hargraves, Stouffer
Company K. Sixteenth infantry -Hiltrop.
MacMullen, Patrick. Smith, Ohisholm, Saym
koweak, Paris, Robertson, I^embke.
Company K. Sixteenth infantry— O'Steen,
Chase, Vansteenbnrab, Gaffney. Uinglag, Plog
ger. Bhipwaah, Hunsel. Alvares.
Company H, Sixth infantry— Ransch, Beck.
Tomechko, Rankin. Wolde. Hutchinson. Jones,
Bh-klcht. Murray. Howard.
Company C. Sixteenth infantry—Willis. Per
•ottett. Barnes, Markes. Mau, Hoover, Deavers.
Thirty-second company. C. A. C.—Crow
Reever. Worth. Traab, Edlck, Hunter. Hall!
Hogan. Stine. Wylle.
One Hundred and Sixty first company, C. A
C.—Gilbert. McKeown. Smith. Gntterman]
Caldwell, Colem, Hogan. Mitchell, Niemtschk
Strolke.
DIVISION B
Company B. Sixth Infantry—Story. Shcchan,
Barmatys. Cummins, Overbv, Sterratt. Zebar
Reley, Bhrhardt.
Blxty-srst company, C. A. C. McMlnn. Man
son, Kimball. Clayton. Huebner. Hopkins
Nlcholls. Wssbtosk. McKlnney. Tipps.
Company F, Sixteenth Infantrv—Butterfleld,
Hauswlrth, Harrfes, Durham, Kll.ng, Mawk]
Durham.
Company C, Sixth infantry—Trumbel. Mul
len. Cairns, Norton, Llndelof. Barde. Cravens,
Hooch. Geldmacher. Eva In.
Company D, Sixteenth Infantry —Ssnford.
Bchelter, Bfgaouette, rrederlcks,' MoEveny
Smith, Reed. Fisher. Angel. Wlelsma.
Compan O, Sixteenth Infantry—Koch, At
wood, Mechling. Rlean, Springer, Warner. War
wick. Wunderllch, Richtmeyer.
Company U Sixteenth infantry—Eversole,
Gibson. Gill more. Hlatt, Looker. Milllgan,
Myers, Warburtoa. Van Syckle. Driscow
Company F. Sixth infantry—Goodman, Gott
lieb, Wadswortb, Kajtanlka, Hawell, Young,
Bobrorik.
ATHLETIC AGREEMENT
Here la article 2 of the agreement
between the A. A. T.J., claiming to be
the governing body of amateur sports,
and the United States of America
Football association, claiming to be
the governing body of amateur soc
cer in this country:
"The Amateur Athletic union agrees
to recognize the rights of an amateur
association (soccer) football player
to play with or against a profes
sional (soccer) football team without
losing his amateur standing thereby."
Sort of seems In direct contradic
tion to all amateur laws of the A. A.
V., If not hypocrisy.
FORMER LEADERS
PLAN TO AID
OLD ELI
NEW HAVEN, Conn., Dec. 11.—Cap
tain-elect Nelson Talbott of the Yale
football eleven has Invited about a
dozen former Yale football captains
and prominent players to meet him
here next Saturday evening to discuss
the season of 1914.
The list comprises practically the
alumni who formed the coaching staff
of Captain Henry Ketcham the last
fall. Captain Talbott said that he
wished to talk over general matters,
but that nothing will He discussed of
a specific nature and that the coach
ing staff will not be announced after
the meeting.
Yale's policy for next season will be
shaped as a result of the meeting. A
session such as is planned will, it is
thought, point out the mistakes of the
season and make it possible to elimi
nate them next fall.
Yale football officials fully expect
that Howard Jones will return next
fall as head field coach. Although he
has signed no formal contract, he has
an understanding that he can remain
three years to establish a permanent
situation. When he left here at the
end of the season he fully intended to
return, and his name is expected to
head the list of coaches whom Cap
tain Talbott will announce in about
two weeks.
Sacred Heart Lads
Are Awarded Blocks
For Athletic Work
Block emblems of Sacred Heart col
lege were yesterday presented to suc
cessful athletes by the board of ath
letic control, including E. M. Glade.
E. A. Welch, W. H. Crowell and J. J.
Connelly. The following were awarded
the blocks for successful competition
during last year:
San Francisco Intercollegiate basket ball
championship -Joseph Harry. John Lticey, John
Connolly, Harold O'Neill, John A. Dennis, Eu
gene A. Welch.
San Francisco subleague baseball champions
-John F. Connollv. Todd Murray. Hsrry
O'Neill. Ed Rinke, J. Eraradt Gerrity, Tom
Kelly, J. J. O'Donnell. Thomas Price. Clyde
Welch, Paul O'Shaughuessy and Francis Rob
In son.
Have- Gavlgan was the. recipient of
a block for his success in the A. A. L..
cross country run, in which he fin
ished second.
Class numerals were awarded as
follows:
Pan Collins '14. Harold Burke '16. Dave
Gavlgan '14. Matt Brecn '10. George Cresry
'18. Bill Delaney '14. Paul O'Shaughnessy '14,
John Qutnnen 'In. Richard Gorman 10. Harold
O'Nell '10. Thomas Price MR. John Connolly
'16. Al Cummins '16, Charles Gallagher '18.
The relay team of the 100 pound
class were awarded "circle blocks."
Establishing a Right
of Way
IT seems like pretty smooth sailing, when you get
a clear line and have a telephone talk with a party
in another city a thousand miles away.
You see nothing of the wonderful switchboards
where skillful operators handle your call and the
. lines are "hooked up" to give your talk the right of
way over two thousand miles of copper wire, guarded
every inch of the way from all kinds of interference.
You scarcely realize that during every moment
of your thousand-mile telephone talk, telephone ap
paratus and plant valued at from $150,000 to $200,
-000 are at your exclusive service.
In the Bell Telephone System 26,000,000
connections are made daily, giving clear tracks for
the telephone talk of the nation and requiring over
one billion dollars' worth of telephone equipment.
Every Bell Telephone Is a Long
£BJ)tIIE PACIfIC TELEPHONE ([AI
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY 7
ATHLETIC
CHATTER
Archie Cloud, former president of
the Academic league, thinks that the
muchly discussed "blue blanks" in
the league have run themselves to
death. Good boy, Archie. The trouble
is, the average members of the Aca
demic league have grown up on the
"blue blanks*' and have gotten the
thing so rammed into their heads
that they can not see any other way
to overcome spholastic troubles. The
blue blank has been a hindance to
school athletics for the last few years
and has done more to get the sub
leagues and its members Into trouble
than any other form of the league's
policy.
* * #
Duke Kahanamoku is a popular lad
these days. Australia wants him next
month and February for a series of
contests. It is not likely that he will
go to Australia for some time, as he
is scheduled to compete in the Mid-
Pacific carnival sports at Honolulu
during the week of February 18 to
21. If the Olympic club decides to
invite the Illinois athletic club cham
pions out here, Duke will undoubted
ly be. asked to come here and com
pete. it is hardly likely that these
events, however, will be pulled off be
fore March.
* * *
What is the reason for the various
T. M. C. A. swimmers, basket ball
players, etc., forsaking this institu
tion and joining the Olympic club?
There must be a reason.
An athlete is his own boss. If he
wishes to transfer from one club to
another that is his business, and not
even the whole membership of an or
ganization can prevent him, but the
organization he is leaving can put all
sorts of obstacles in his way to pre
vent him from competing for his new
love for a limited period.
* * *
Here is a Marathon runner with a
Marathon name—Nick Gianakopulous.
He is a member of the Yonkers. New
York. Athletic club, and expects
to represent Uncle Sam at the games
at Athens next year. Looks as though
his name is too much of a handicap.
* « »
The genuine original Marathon
course will be used at the games ajt
Athens next year. The course is from
the little town of Marathon into
Athens, a distance of 26 miles 387
yards. «
* * *
The question has been asked. What
does football fit a young man for?
Can any of our readers give us a
hunch? The "nearest we know it fits
him for is the hospital.
* #• »
This lad Robinson, who made a sen
sation last year as a sprinter with
the Mercerburg academy team, will
not compete in any indoor meets in
ehe east this season. He has decided
to rest up until spring to regain his
strength from his recent illness.
* * »
Surh a game would go a long way
toward definitely settling the suprem
acy of the east and the west. Har
vard is the eastern champion and
Chicago the western. It would also
give Walter Camp an opportunity to
make a few more comparisons.
HANDICAP LISTS
OF GOLFERS IN
DEMAND
NEW YORK, Dec. 11— Notice is be
ing served on the 357 golf clubs which
are members of the United States
Golf association to send In at once
their handicap lists. Because of the
large number of plays it has been de
cided to list only those allowed five
strokes based on par figures instead
of six as heretofore.
The United States Golf association
will not be responsible for names of
players omitted from the national
handicap list unless representations
are received on or before December
20. and In the event of such an omis
sion the golfer will not be eligible to
compete In the national amateur
championship, according to the no
tice signed by Robert C. Watson, the
president.
The annual meeting of the associa
tion will be held in this city on Janu
ary 9.
AMUSEMENTS
SYmphMY
ORCHESTRA
Henry Hadley Conductor
CORT—Tomorrow 3 P. M.
ALL WAGNER PROGRAM
"Tannh«u»fr," Overture; "Lohen
grin," Prelude "Parsifal," Good
Friday Spell: "Siegfried," Forest
Murmurs; "TTiatan and laolde,"
Prelude and Isolde's Love Death;
"Siegfried Idyl."
Prices—s2.oo. $1.50, $1.00, 73c. Box
I.oge Seats. $3.00.
Scat" on Bale Now nt Box Offices STier
man. Clay & Co.'s, Kobler A Chase's and
Cort Theater.
V f
» — ■_j LEADING THBATKB
■ *!QEKaP Ellls and Market
Wk m Birm te/m Phone Sutter 2460
«k \#l %*J LAST TIME
SI N. NIGHT
«1 MATINEE DAILY (Except Friday)
ALICE LLOYD
And Her Company of Entertainers. With
FHA.Mi FOGARTY. Nights, 25c to $1.50.
Mon. Mslit—l Week—Seat" Thura.
Wm. Morris Co. In Cosmo Hamilton's
I Blindness of Virtue
A great play nnfoldlng a great truth that
every father, mother and vonng girl should see
Nights, 25c to $1.50. $1 Mats. Wed. and Sat.
Wed. Mat. for Women and Girls Only.
\C*r-P*rort« Gutter 4/-*/
OJ opp Orfx/ieum
MATINEE TODAY
LAST TIME SUNDAY NIGHT
THE CANDY SHOP
WITH
ROCK and FULTON
Tnes., Dec. 16—IRENE KR ANKLIN
SKtTS OX SALE TODAY
MATINEE TODAY AND EVERY DAY.
A WONDERFUL NEW SHOW
TAYLOR GRANVILLE. LAURA PIERPONT
•nd Company of 15 In "The System." by Tay
lor Granville and Junle McCtee-. LYONS and
YOSCO. "the Harpist aftd the Singer'": CLAY
TON KENNEDY and MATT IE ROONBY, In
"Tlie Happy Medium": MARSHALL MONT
GOMERY, the Extraordinary Ventriloquist;
LA TOY BROTHERS. Pantomlmists: BILLY
GOULD and BELLE ABHLYN; JOHN E.
HA/.ZARD: WORLD'S NEWS IN EXCLUSIVE
MOTION VIEWS; Last Week, tbe Twin Night
ingales. MARIE ami MARY McFARLAND.
New Songs.
EVENING PRICES—IOc, 25c. 50c, 75c. Box
seatf4sL Matinee prices, except Sundays and
holidays—loc. 25c. 50c. Phone Douglas 70.
Market
1 JSf The May house Beautifu
ALL THIS AND NEXT WEEK
Immediate Hit: Splendid (ant!
A Dramatization of ROBERT W.
CHAMBERS' Senaational Novel
THE I
COMMON LAW
The Greatest Story ©f New York
Studio Life Ever Written.
j Nights and Sunday Matinees. 25c to $1.
Tad
STILL AFTER RUBE
iiuue marquara, pucner ior the New
York Giants, and Blossom Seeley. Ms
wife, with whom he is playing in a
vaudeville sketch at a local music
hall, were sued for $1,000 in the mu
nicipal court recently by Joseph Co
hen.
Cohen Is Mrs. Marquard's former
husband, according to his attorney,
Fred Lowenthal, who declared that
the present suit arises from a suit
for alienation of his wife's affections
brought by Cohen against Marqu^rd.
"Cohen recovered a Judgment of
$4,000." said Lowenthal. "Marquard
paid him $3,000 in cash and gave his
note for the remainder, which Blos
som Seeley indorsed. He has failed
to pay the note."
FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF
ROOMS READ THE CALL WANT
ADS UNDER ROOMS TO LET.
AMUSEMENTS
The Leading PUyhouse "Geary and Mason
THIS AXD NEXT WEEK
Nightly Except Sun. — Matinees Wed. and Sat.
FSKL
THE HIGH ROAD
Mat. Today—Last 4 Nights
! Evelyn Vaughan, Bert Lytell
And the Alcaxar Company In
"SALOMY JANE"
Panl Armstrong's Play of the Sierras.
PRICES—Night. 23c to $1; Mats.. 25c to 50c.
MATINEES SATURDAY AND SUNDAY.
NEXT WEEK—The" Big Musical Hit.
"GIRL, IN THE TAXI"
Miss Vaughan and Mr. Lvtell Heading Cast.
tmmm
i i iv strwt. .Near Market.
I\ PHOTOPLAYS DE M'XE
Only 3 Days More
George Kleine's
Truly Wonderful Photo Drama.
QUO VADIS
Continuous, 12 m.-l 1 p. ni. Daily.
Matinees. 10c; Nights. 1(V and 15c.
Commencing; Sunday,
"EAST I.YKNE."
WGrSSffii y Mr Wdgt fSm
MARKET ST. OTP. MASON.
I Bothwell Browne's Musical Mixture.
! "INN LAUGHLAND"
With 15 Tantalizing Tango Teasers.
ALEXANDER KAMINSKY
Imperial Russian Violinist Virtuoso.
A True Incident of Mexico Today.
"THE SACRIFICE"
A Gripping Romance With a Big Cast.
5 OTHER PANTAGES FEATURES.
JOE MAXWELL'S PLAYERS IN
LOUIS' CHRISTMAS
Vaudeville's Most Enjoyable Comedy
THE DANCING MARS
In a Terpsii-horenn Plnylet. "All for a Kiss"
ADELYNE LOWE CO.
in "At the Cafe d'la Parisian." an Aerial
6-Orht.K li.C, " Ai'lfeA/ ■j -
PKICL6 . iCc. 80c, 30c
ILURLINE
| BUSH AND L.AHKIN STREETS
Ocean Water Baths
SWIMMING AXD TUB BATHS
i Salt water direct from the ocean. Opea
< every day and evening, including Sunday*
and holidays, from 7 i m. to 10 p. «,
Spectators' gallery free.
The Sanitary Baths
Natatorlnra reserved Tuesday and Friday
I mornings tiom a o'clock to noon for women
"FILTERED OCEAN WATER PLUNGE."
COMFORTABLY HEATED, CONSTANTLY
CIRCULTAING AND FILTERING.
! Hot Air Hair Dryers, Electric Curlinr Irons
I and Shampoo Room for Women Bathers Free
BRANCH TUB BATHS. 8161 GEARY 6T
NEAR DIVISADERO.

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