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Evening bulletin. (Maysville [Ky.]) 1882-1883, March 27, 1882, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069125/1882-03-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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EASTER CARDS AT PHISTER'S.
Omening & BULLETIN. HJJ)
' rfrf77tin1 " HEW TO THE LINE, LET THE CHIPS FALL WHERE THEY MAY."
t a i t ' k
VOLUME 1. MA YSYXLLE, MONDAY EVENING, MARCH 27, 1882. NUMBER 107.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK.
CAPITAL. STOCK $210,000.
JAMES M. MITCHELL, THOMAP "WELLS
TllKSIUKNT. CAS1UKK.
nept2.
MAYSV1LLE.KY
E. F. CLEVELAND,
Architect and Builder,
DOVER, IY.
- ri' H
I ESTIMATES of work nnd building plans
nlshed promptlyund on the most reasonable
terms. mnrl33ra
J. T. CASSIDY.
P. M.YOUNG
CASSIDY & YOUNG,
"Wholesale and Retail
GROCER
Produce and Commission Merchants,19 Market
Street, (B. F. Thomas & Co.'s old stand.)
Ky. )enlers in nil kinds of Field and
Garden Seeds, Flour. Fruits, Potatoes, Bacon
and Lard, pure Liquors of all kind, (J)uiPd
Goods n specialty. Highest market price paid
elthei in cash or trade for all kinds of Country
Pioduce. Consignments solicited. V2Sy
M
r. MA Ii8 HI.
F. L. TRAYSER,
PIANO MANUFACTURER
Front St., 4 doors west of Hill Hounc
Grand, Upright and Square Pianos, also the
best make of Organs at lowest manufacturers'
pricps; Tun In? and Repairing n!7.
KILLS ! MF
IWEilTLr EXECUTED feAL
CRAWFORD HOUSE.
Cor. Sixth and Walnut Sts.
o
Lkwis Vandkn, Proprietor.
I thp T.fiwts mid iMiirnn Conntv TuriinikP
iirxaminer jor Vinson uiumy ami item nstaif Kond Company will beheld on Saturday, April
and Insurance Agent. Special attention given
to collections. Oflice Court street, Maysvllle,
Ky.
ANNUAL MEETING.
'1M1E annual meeting of the stockholders of
1st. at 10 o'clock a. in . at the SherlM's oflice in
the Court House. Maysville, Ky., lor the purpose
ot electing ofllcers for the ensuing year.
miU'Hww u. w. iiLLiij, fiesiuent.
Jt65l35TIZ
UMVUBAM
JOSEPH F. BRODRICK,
MAYSVILLE, KY.
Fire, Life and Marine
U A H T Ij 1 IJ i
Tlie largest and most elegant assortment of all grades of
Carpets, Lace Curtains
and UPHOLSTERING GOODS
Is constantly to be found at our extensive warerooms. Special attention paid
to non-resident buyers.
Geo. F. Otte fc Co.,
3LS3 XTCT. lEoTiarfcfci St., Oiaa.oJLo.aa.ti'j O
i
Life Within tlio Arctic Circle.
The traveler is surprised to meet so
many comfortable farms "with large
dwelling houses, which, with the barn
and cow-house, are the three prominent
buildings. There are several other
houses besides, such as sheds, storehouses,
blacksmith shops, etc. Iu the
yard, which is generally enclosed by the
houses on three sides," is the old-fashioned
well with its sweep, a bucket at
one end and a stone at the other. From
the well a trough communicates with the
building where the cows are kppt. The
structure is peculiar. The ceiling is low,
the windows very small, giving but little
light; the place is entirely floored, and
pens built 'on each side; along these a
gutter gathers all the manure, which is
preserved .with great care. The dittle
do not lie on straw or hay. At one end
of the room is a large piece of masonry,
encasing an iron pot three or four feet in
diameter and three feet deep, used for
cooking food for the cattle. This food is
generally coarse marsh grass, mixed
with the dust coming from the threshing
of the grain. The pot is also used as
the bathing and washing tub. Sheep,
when numerous, have a house to them
selves ; if not, they are penned in a corner.
There is a separate stable for the
horse. The dwelling, with few exceptions,
consist of a single story, usually
containing two rooms, one on each side.
One is used as a bakery and kitchen, and
also as a ; at one corner is
the fireplace, a slrauge structure, six or
eight feet square, made of solid flat
slabs of stone, generally plastered over.
Wood is placed in thcae ovens, and,
when it is consumed and only charcoal
remains, a sliding iron trap-door prevents
the heat from escapiug, warming
the walls. The heat thus produced for
.the first few hours is very great ; often
the room is made unbearable to those
who are not accustomed to such an atmosphere,
which is often retained for
two or three days. In one section of the
structure there is an open fireplace used
for cooking. Beds are placed along the
walls, in number according to the size
of the family. These are a kind of
sliding-box, so that they can be made of
different widths, according to the requirements.
They are filled with hay
or straw, furnished with home-made
blankets or sheepskins, and sometimes
with eider down covers and pillows. In
the morning the box is drawn in, and,
when covered with a board, answers for
a sofa, upon which people rest during
the day. The whole family, including
servants, males and females, sleep in
this room. On the other side is the
guest room, which is also used as a
sleeping apartment; one or two bedsteads,
the beds filled with the down of
the eider duck; the blankets made of the
same material, form the chief port of the
furniture. M. du Chaillu.
I TTT
s
Italics and Punctuation.
Header! when you write an artiole
or any periodical, or a letter to a friend,
never use italics except in some very
unusual emergency, for their employment
implies that the sentence has been
badly constructed and needs artificial
j emphasis before its meaning can be un
I derstood. A clause in italics always
bears testimony to 'the writer's clnmsi
i ness. So of general punctuation
I Punctuate as little as possible. Punct
uation marks can usually be dispensed
with if the reader bo not too ignorant
or too indolent to construct rightly in
the first p'ace the sentence in which
they are employed. If the adverbial
clauses of a sentence be properly distributed
in relation to the chief statements
of which they are modifications
the parenthesis becomes a crooked folly
and the comma a trifling superfluity.
Of course some punctuation marks are
needed : the period, to indicate tlio end
of a sentence ; the semicolon, to indicate
where a sentence came very hear
ending and didn't ; perhaps the exclamation
point to tell the reader wliere to
be astonished, though if he feels so disposed
he may possibly learn to be
shocked on his own hook ; the interrogation
point; now and then even a
comma to prove the imperfection of
language at the point of a mere human
pen. But every comma is an apology
offered by the writer to the reader.
The parenthesis is never to be used ; at
most not more than once a week by a
constant writer. The dash or comma is
an effective substitute. Finally, let it
be borne in mind that much punctuation
is the infallible sign of poor writing.
American Queen.
Books.
England has given to the world four
, books which are immortal. They have
traveled through the world, have been
read by millions, have been translated
in man, different languages, and still
I are mar down the years to enrich
and bless the generations. Their story
is of deepest interest, and around each
, cluster fragrant and pleasant memories,
Bunyan the sturdy non-conformist,
sending from the walls of Bedford jail
, his unique book. Baxter, warmly loved
.. and fiercely hated, also imprisoned for
his religious views, giving us liis "Saint's
Best," which has blessed a multitude of
waiting souls. De Foe. who for his
principles was now in the closet of the
' King, aud then in the dreary dungeons
of Newgate, whose ' 'Bobinson Crusoe" has
stolen the hours of sleep from millions ;
and Issac "Watts, whose hymns will be
sung so long as church walls and cathedral
towers stand. All have a bold
' upon the English-speaking race that can
never be broken. &'. & Brideman. .
I I I L 'T ?
3
s
The most novel and .beautiful designs of Easter Cards, representing the best talent in the country, arc those at Frank E.
. He has them in ...
v '
r , " j. .
s Engraved Cards, Roand Satin Combination Cards, Embroidered Panels,
Fringed Satin, Swan's Down, Painted Satin,
Silk" fringed and Swan's Down, Embossed Cards, new Shapes, Designs, &c.
r ,
C2E fM!i "Maf11 m
ill
K
Wg& 1 JUL ,, jE, JL-H S5

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