OCR Interpretation


Evening bulletin. (Maysville [Ky.]) 1882-1883, May 16, 1882, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069125/1882-05-16/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

DAILY EVENING BULLETIN,
TUESDAY EVENING, MAY 10, 1882.
: TllO LVKN1NO ilULLKTIN is pub
llshed cluily, nd served iree ot postage at 0
cents per week; 25 cents per mouth; 75 cents
per three months : 81.50 per six months, und $3
per year, payable In advance.
esrTllB EVENING BULLETIN HAS A
LARGER CIRCULATION IN THIS CITY,
CHESTER AND ABERDEEN, OHIO, THAN
ANY Ol HER PAPER PUBLISHED IN MAYS-VILLE.
Pardon and Amnesty.
The American Review says : In cases of
rebellion and civil war the highest achievements
of statesmanship have been accomplished
by acts of grace and beneficence in
the form of a pardon and amnesty. Magnanimous,
liberal and generous acts over
come passion, prejudice anu contumacy
when the iron heel of oppression, and
tyranny would only serve to render them
more implacable and obdurate. Such is
human nature, and such it has been in all
ages and nations. The bald eagle may be
chained, but he can'not be tamed by force
and violence. So freemen knowing their
rights, although they may be overcome by
superior power, cannot be made obedient
political slaves. The ancient Greeks and
Romans showed their wisdom and consummate
statesmanship by the use of pardon
and amnesty in the cases of rebellion
and civil war. So also in great and trying
emergencies has this skill in civil government
been displayed in the course of the
English government, and also by Napoleon
Bonaparte in some of his greatest achievements.
Oppression and tyranny have been
the usual instrumentalities of unhallowed
ambition or atrocious pusillanimity.
In July, 1802, congress authorized the
President to issue his proclamation granting
pardon and amnesty to persons who
may have participated in the then existing
rebellion, "at such time and on such
conditions as he may deem expedient for
the public welfare." (see U. S. btat. at
Large, vol. 12, p. 572.) Subsequently the
Supreme Court decided that, by the express
terms qf the Constitution, the power
to grant pardon and 'amnesty was exclusively
vested in the President and, that
congress had nothing to do with it.
On 25th of December, 1868, the President
issued his general and full pardon
and amnesty to all and every person who
had in any way participated directly or indirectly
in the rebellion, together with
restoration of all rights, privileges and
immunities under the Constitution and
the laws.
The ratifications of the fourteenth
amendment of the Constitution was declared
to have been made and to be com-.
plete in July, 1808. And the general and
full pardon came afterward on the 25th of
December, 1SG8. And the the Supreme
Court decided in December, 1SG9, that the
pardon and amnesty removed all penalties
and disabilities of every kind, " purged
every person of whatever offense against
the laws of the United States may have
been committed ;" so that in the eye of
the law the offender was as innocent as if
he had never committed any offense.
(See Wul, It., vol., 9, pp. 542 and 513.)
Under this general and full pardon and
amnesty, thus interpreted and declared to
be the law of the land by the Supreme
Court, the people of the Southern States
were all placed on an equal footing as to
loyalty, and fully entitled to restoration of
all rights, privileges and immunities.
But the Republican party and the Republican
congress not only ignored, but
refused to observe and enforce this act of
Executive clemency which had become
the law of the laud, have refused to allow
a restoration of a harmonious union of the
the States. To subaerve partisans purposes
tho sectional animosities, passions
and prejudices engendered by the war
have been kept alive by tho Republican
party and renewed at every Presidential
election. Tho supremacy of this party has
been maintained at a sacrifice of harmonious
and prosperous union of the States.
Charles Sumner, radical us he was
a bill into the United States Senate,
December 2, 1872, (Forty-second congress,)
as follows :
Whereas, the national unity and good will
among can be assured only
through oblivion of pnst differences, and it Is
contrary to the usage of civilized nations to
perpetuate the memory of civil war ;
Be it enacted, tic. That that the names of
battled with fellow-citizens shall not bo
continued in the Army Register, or placed on
the regimental colors of the United States.
In this proceeding Mr. Sumner was only
following examples of enlightened statesmanship
in other ages and countries, in
cases ot rebellion, directed by- elevated
views and a profound knowledge of human
nature. But the radicals in the
Massachusetts Legislature passed a resolution
of censure upon Senator Sumner for
this attempt at liberal statesmanship.
The spirit of Radical republicanism has
defeated all elevated and enlarged statesmanship,
prevented the restoration of a
hormonious union of the States, and in
its atrocity and rapacity committed crimes
for which a parallel can be found only in
the darkest days of the French Revolution.
NEWS BREVITIES.
Ex-Governor C, C. Washburn is dead,
The French squadron has sailed for
Alexandria.
Lightning rod swindlers are operating
in the vicinity of Wabash, Ind.
Sarah Winne, the "Circassian Girl" in
the JNTew York Museum, has eloped.
A Turkish transport went ashore in the
Bosphorus, and fifty soldiers were drowned.
Heavy shipments of coffee are making
from the Central American coast for San
Francisco.
The Pacific Mail steamer Salvador, coffee
laden, from Costa Rica, sprung a leak
and was lost.
The U. S. Court at Indianapolis has
decided that warehousemen may insure
grain deposited with them.
The American Tract Society issued the
past year 292,000 volumes, received $379,-221,
and expended $374,097.
Specie exports from New York, Saturday,
$200,000 in gold and $250,000 in silver.
Mrs. Garfield Las written a letter to
Senator Sherman acknowledging the pen
sion granted her.
A three-year-old child of John Miller
died at Hagerstown, Ind., from the effects
of impure virus used in vacccination.
Reuben Lucas, for the murder of T. M.
Kinney, in tho Choctaw Nation, has been
sentenced to be shot May 26.
It is estimated that the yield of wheat
and oats in South Carolina and Georgia
will be larger than any year since the war.
Z. E. Simmons, a New York lottery
man, has obtained a judgment for $5S,480
against the estate of the late Cornelius J.
Vanderbilt.
The Cleveland iron mills Saturday paid
off the striking employes, the pay roll
amounting to $100,000. "it is thought the
mills will not resume work.
General Joseph G. Barnard, for many
years at the head of the Department Engineers
U. S. Army, died at Detroit.
Mrs. Phoobe Spruce was murdered near
Rome, Ga. Uer husband, who wanted to
marry another woman, has been arrested
on suspicion of the crime.
Gentlemen personally interested in
knowing all about it, state, after inquiry,
that Sir. Blaine will not accept tho proffered
place on the congressional ticket of
Maine.
An Austrian physician, who visited tho
Jews' hospital at Odessa, states that there
are one hundred and twenty-five horribly
mutilated persons there, the Russians having
poureu petroleum into their wounds.
The scheme of utilizing tho immense
water power of NiagaraFalls isaboutto be
carried into experiment. It is announced
that purchases and contracts have been
made to this end, and that a generator of
electricity will bo ostabliu'ied from which
all tho towns and cities in six hundred
miles may bo lighted,
Don't Be FOOLED
By "CHEAP JACK" Advertisements,
but Come to The Only
! DRY ! GOODS I STBREI
Iii Town, where You can get Everything
yon want and of the Very Best.
GENT'S FURNISHING GOODS
Socks, Shirts,
"Underwear,
Of Every Kind
Handkerchiefs, Teis,
Gloves and Hats.
AN IMMENSE STOCK OF
Dress Goods
Xffi
All New and- Fresh.
Embroideries, Hosiery, Gloves,
Handkerchiefs, Collars, Ties,
Ribbons, Parasols, Fans,
LINEN DUSTERS,
RUBBER COATS,
And very Avtiol9 A. Lady can malsa uso of.
-DON'T FAIL TO SEE OUR STOCK OP-
C" y HF? tTRi ' I
HUNT &
Second Street,
Mi
mi
YLE,
s
i)
-MAYSVILLE, KY;

xml | txt