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The Breckenridge news. (Cloverport, Ky.) 1876-1955, October 30, 1912, Image 1

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THE BRECKENRIDGE NEWS.
ALL THE NEWS THAT'S FIT TO PRINT.
VOL. XXXVII
CLOVERPORT, KENTUCKY, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1912.
8 Pages
No. 17
igures and Facts
For Farmers
I In 1892 Cleveland was elected President on a Free Trade
piai.rorm. 1 Ills yca.1 VV liaun id lummig iui i iwiuur uu a-
atly the same Free Trade platform. Taft is on a platform
which declares for protection to the American Farmer.
Here is what the farmers of Breckinridge County received
for their products from 1893-7 under Cleveland and Free
FTrade and what they are receiving now under Taft.
H DlH. MOORMAN, Cmaimh
LEE WALLS, Sientunr '
J. D. BABBAGE, Puaucirr Cohmittii
ADVISOR COMMITTER
MORRIS H. BEARD
JOHN O'REILLY
Prices 1893-7
.. per bu. .42
..... " " .20
.... 4" " .16 .
.... " ton 7.00
,.. " lb. .2 3-4
" " .2 1-2
" " .2 3-4
Products
Wheat..... -
Corn -
Oats
Hay ....
Hogs
Cattle
Lambs
Sheep " hd. 1.50
Good Mules -J. " " 80.00 '....
Good Horses " " 75.00
Wool "lb. .11
Eggs , "dz. .06
Chickens 44 lb. ..04
Turkeys... 44 44 .04 1-2
Tobacco -.. 3, 2 & 0
Prices 1912
$1.00
80 .
50 ,
20.00
8 3-4
07
07 1 4
6.00
225.00
. 200 00
28 .
20
10
15
9,86c 5
I "(These prices show that the farmer receives under protec
tion on an average more than three timTes the amount he ob
tained under Free Trade. Then why change the policy of
:he government? G,Do not listen to the politicians who
;eek advancement and office. Discuss these, matters with
'our family and then vote f or your OWH pocket book. adv.
ISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE
DWENSBDRO DISTRICT IN SESSION HERE
'resident of the Louisville Conference Honors the Meeting. Miss
DavieS, of Atlanta, will Arrive Tomorrow Mrs. Bettie White
' head and Mrs. Walter J. Piggott, Conference Officers in Attendance.
Whitehead, the rtcordinu socetary.
Mrs. Wilbur Barony, who arrived
IF
The Woman's Missionary Societies fourth vice president, and Mrs. Bettie
If the Owensboro District holds its an
ual meeting at the Methodist church
i thiscity today and tomorrow. Mrs.
R"EMell, district secretary, arrived
evening to complete the arrange-
nts for the program, which begins
J.0:30 o'clock this morning. The meet-
will be opened by Mrs. V. G. Bab-
re, president of the local auxiliary,
hhe Rev, Mr. Walker, pastor of the
mrch, will offer the invocation.
'After reports are heard from the aux-
larles represented and other business
Itapersed with, the session will nd-
irn until the afternoon. The dele
tes will be assigned their homes by
LrsBabbage, the president, assisted
Missvunurea uauoage. inc guests
til be received and taken to their
us by the reception committee:
Istes Susette Sawyer, Martha Miller,
luile DeHaven, Elizabeth SUlllman,
.Misses Smith and Miss Louise Bab-
re.
Unusual Honor.
iti is the first district meeting ev-
wn to be visited by four confer-
i officers. As a rule, the district
Bting is usually attended by a dele
ion from the auxiliaries and one or
of the conference officers. The
iverport women of the Methodist
ta'ch appreciate the opportunity to
c and hear and know Mrs. H. A.
"toi Louisville, the conference
nt, MIh Tula Daniels, the cor
IL ''..I -t L . aL- I J-
onuing sucrwary or me loreign ue
intent, Mrs. Walter J. Piggott, the
from Louisville this morning, will give
a talk on "The Religions of The
World" which will be er joyed by every
man ana woman of Cloverport. Tomor
row evening Miss Daisy Davles, of At
lanta, Ga , who is one of the managers
of the Board of Missions, will make an
address of much importance. Among
the deli-gates expected are Mrs. Crab-
tree and Mrs. Solesburg, of Central
City, Mrs Wegenest and Mrs. Jarboe,
of Htephensport, Mrs. Malln and Mrs.
Moor 0' Owensboro, and Mrs. Taylor
nl Mr from eaver Dam. Those
who have mido dt fin te plans to enter
tain the del tja es and visitors are:
Mrs KanK Fraize, Mrs Forrest Light-
MRS. BF-rrib WHlTI-HbAD
Oilico uai ur of I ho IV iocos"ul Humid, who
will bpeik. nt ilu M.'tbo not ciiui'uli tin evening
j ;.'
Rend livery Line.
Democratic Campaign Headquarters
Hardinsburg, Ky., October 29, 1912.
Notice to Democrats and Committeemen:
A meeting of tbo Breckinridge County Democratic Executive find Campaign Committees is
hereby called for Saturday, November 2, 1912, at the Court House in Hardinsburg, at the hour of one
o'clock p. m. At this hour and place the Democrats of our county will receive a messago from Gov.
Woodrow Wilson, and the Committees will convey same to their respective precincts. All Democrat
arc invited to bo present.
I was in State headquarters this week and saw direct communications from the National Demo
cratic managers. They say that victory i3 ours, without doubt. Therefore, it should bo tho ambition
and purpose of every Committeeman and every Democrat to make our county's showing such as to do
servo its share of tho honors and patronage, if any thero be. Tho Progressives have developed unex
pected and appalling strength in many of the formerly safe Republican States. Money is being bet in
Louisville that Roosevelt will carry Kentucky over Taft. The "Bull Moosers" aro in tho battle to tho
finish, and will control the county organization of many Kentucky counties. Their managers claim they
will break oven or carry Breckinridge. The New York, Ohio and Indiana Republican vote is about
evenly divided between Taft and Roosevelt, thus indicating Wilson's victory in each of theso pivotal
States, and California is practically sure to be carried by Roosevelt. Pennsylvania oven is very doubt
ful, and favors Wilson.
I earnestly urge that the Democratic election officers bo at tho polls promptl'. Let those who
have heretofore served be on hand to give advice and assistance in procuring a full vote and fair count.
Challengers and inspectors will be named by the precinct chairman.
Our friends, the Republicans, have heretofore howled for clean politics. It is a notorious fact
that the' bought each other like cattle in the recent county convention, which was dominated by post
masters and office-holders. I do not know whether or not they will use money or whiskey in this elec
tion. I do know that every cent that I have disbursed is tho voluntary gift of individuals, contributed
as heretofore published; and further, that not one cent of it has been or will bo spent for votes or whis
key, and that my disposition of every cent of it will be shown by written publication. Our campaign
has been and will be conducted as our peerless leader has directed, "by the people and for the people."
If we win, so much greater the victory; if we lose, wo at least can remember that our cause was right
eous, and that our methods and candidate were fair and clean.
I earnestly urio that young Democrats of tho county to become interested in politics and good
government. Although Kentucky is positively safe, our count' is always a battle ground, and next
year is tho time for a struggle. If you hope for the assistance of othors next year, help tho organiza
tion now. What your precinct does usually shows what you have done as individuals. You should have
an interest in politics now, even if you want nothing; and, if you want nothing now, you may some
time. Get out tho vote in your precinct as on this tho result largely depends.
Senator Bradley will arrive Wednesday full of light and pretended confidence. He is an ex
perienced, brilliant and eloquent campaigner. I am informed that tho great trick that will be sprung
at tho last momont is tho announcement "THAT ROOSEVELT IS OUT OF THE RACE AND THAT
ALL OF HIS STRENGTH WILL GO TO TAFT." I believe our people are too smart to be gulled
by this, and I only mention it that all may know how to meet the report.
Having done all that I have been directed to do by tho higher campaign authorities, I trust
that tho five Committeemen in each precinct will see mo on or boforo November 2, and receive final in
structions and do their duty; and that every Democrat will vote himself and see that those around him
do likewise. Lot's all realize our duty, as this is the best chance of our lives to elect our man.
I am yours for success,
HENRY DeIIAVEN MOORMAN,
Chairman Breckinridge County Campaign and Executive Committees.
J
foot, Mrs. John A. Ross, Mrs. James B.
Randall, Mrs. F. T. Sawyer, Mrs
John D. Babbaga, Mrs. Roscoe Laslio,
Mrs. V. G. Babbage, Mrs. Shelby Con
rad. Mrs. Francis Marlon Smith, Mrs.
C. W. Moorman, Mrs. Allen. Kingsbury
and Mrs. Fred Fralze.
Other Arrangements.
Miss Ida White has arranged the
music for the meeting. Miss Margaret
Burn is organist and the church choir
will sing at the evening services. Miss
ess Eva and Eliza May will sing a duet
Wednesday evening and Miss Edith
Plank will sing a solo. The church has
been decorated in potted plants from
the Oel.e green-house and not a stone
has been left unturned to make the
meeting one of decorum and inspiration.
The members of 'the organization are
men who have held responsible ap
pointments with railroad companies
and whose work is the highest grade.
Mr. Severs has recently been inspector
over six hundred miles of track and his
firm now has enormous contracts
booked for the coming year.
-,
League Business Meet.
The monthly business meeting of the
Epworth League will be held next
Tuesday night. All members are re
quested to attend and bring the dues
for membership. President Denton is
exceedingly anxious that the business
mtetings in I9I2 be largely attended.
Council meeting Monday night.
Has Foot Operated On.
Susan Walker had her foot operated
on at Dr. Simons' Infirmary last week.
She hurt It fifteen years ago, but It did
not give her serious trouble until re
cently. She Is a most excel
lent laundress of Cloverport, and her
work has been the delight of many
homes for years. Her friends hope the
operation will be beneficial.
Mr. Severs Has Entered
An Engineers Firm.
Roscoe Severs, a prominent civil en
gineer of West Virginia, has recently
entered a successful Arm of Jenkins,
Ky.,and it is now known as Ballard,
Herring & Severs, railroad contractors.
New Church at English.
The Baptist church at English will
be dedicated the first Sunday In No
vember by Dr. Powell, of Louisville.
Been III Some Time.
Hovie Wardrip has been ill several
weeks at his home on the West Side.
His friends hope to hear soon that he
is convalescing. Mr. Wardrip is one
of the young men clerks at Fraize's
store.
Mr. Love Moves.
Mr. J. S. Love, of Irvington, who
for some time has had the agency for
Hancock, Breckenridge and Meade
counties with the Natbnal Life and
Accident Co., has been succeeded by
Mr. S. L. Hall, of Owensboro, who
will make his headquarters at Irving
ton. Mr. Love left Thursday for New
Iberia, La., where he will locate. He
has made many friends in Hancock
county, who regret to see him go.
Hancock Clarion.
The Market.
The cattle market slow. Hogs lower
tops $3.10; calves choice 7 and 8 cents;
best lambs M and 5)i cents. Shipping
steers $7 and $3; beefsteers$5ana$7.BO;
feeders 55 and $0. Eggs case count 23
cents.
TWENTY-THREE YEARS.
E. H. Monohan Has Pulled
Through Many Experiences
While Working on the Hen
derson Route-Never 'Sued
the Road.
Miss Ray Heyser and Miss Cleona
Weatherholt will spend today and to
morrow In Louisville shopping, assisted
by Misses Ditto and Falrlelgh.
E, II. Monohan has been with the L.t
H. & St. L. Ry. twentythree years..
During that time he has met with three
severe accidents. At Asklns he was
working in a cut and was buried fifteen
feet in sand. Three men pulled him
out of the sand with his eyes and ears
and mouth full of the grains and three
ribs broken.
It seemed like an avalanche of trou
ble had come over him, but he got well.
No sooner had he recovered than he
got knocked in the head with a spike
and he refused to go to a doctor.
The round of trouble he had was in a
wreck west of Rockvale he got his
jaw-bone broken in three places, skull
crushed in three places, left shoulder
broken, feet scalded and a piece of
timber run in his hip. He was laid off
eight months,
All this ill luck came to him on the
railroad and ha never bued the com
pany. They always treated him right
and he saw no reason for a lawsuit, for
the railroad was not responsible for his
misfortune.
Mr. Monohan lives at Irvington and
has been night watchman since April.
He has not lost an hour of time. Thir
teen years he was section foreman and
never had a man hurt, never had &
wheel off his car during the whole
time and never got off & day.
Mr. Monohan knows how to we thk
silver lining to every cloud, and take
life in the best sort of humor.

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