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The Breckenridge news. (Cloverport, Ky.) 1876-1955, November 20, 1912, Image 4

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1HE BRECKENR1DGE NEWS,
JMJ. 1). bAUUAUi , Lditor and Publisher
lasucd Evory
EIGHT
OLOVERPORT, KYM WFDNESDAY, NOV. 20 1912
Subscription price $1.00 n. your in ndvnncp.
BUSINE-S LOCALS 10c cr lino, nndc for ench' additional
"insertion.
CARDS OF THANKS over five lines charged for at tho rato of
40 cent per lino..
OBITUARIES charged for'at tho rato of 5 cents per lino, money
to advance.
Examino tho label on your paper. If it is not correct please
notify us.
Thanksgiving Day just a week from tomonow.
Saving money curly makes Christina shopping easy.
"I like my job," said Daisy Divics We wonder how many
people can eav that it docs one. god to repeat tho four words.
Arbor Day was celebrated with enthusiasm at Irvineton last Fri
day. - Several trees were planted and tho program for tho event was
vrry inspiring and beneficial.
There is one man Clovcrport
I ' ti-Saloon League representative,
and a large audience appreciated
Clovcrport has been busy all this fall entertaining, and no one
has had time to be lonesome. First, there was tho Sunday School
Convention at the Bapti.-t church, second, the Di-tiiet Missionary
meeting at thc'Mcthodist church, and this week we have three eflici
ent workers from the State Agriculture College holding a farm
school.
The hunting season opened Friday and tho sport-men were the
happiest set of men we have &een since tho loaves turned. Every
ono you meet pulls out a little piece of paper. It's the license and
every hunter is required by the State to carry one. Many have been
issued here and all over tho county. Quail is hard to lind and rab
bits are not plentiful.
A - R - K - A -
As seen by Mr. and
Rice Growing
Editor News: On our return from
Arkansas we promised to contribute an
article on the state's resources. In our
opinion Arkansas is a. reat state, rich
in possibilities and just In its infancy
as to furnishing her share of tha Na
tion's commodities. We visited at
Stuttgart wnich is situated in the heart
of the rice section Most Kentuckians
think when you mention rice .'rowing
that it means low wet land, it's all a
mistake, Arkansas rice is grown on
beautiful "Grand prairie'' land The
rice is sown in the spring just as we
sow wheat, after it comes up the wat:
er is turned on it for three months
covering it from 6 to 8 inches supplied
by wells that are drilled from 60 to 150
feet deep. Some of these pumps fur
nish 2000 gallons of water per minute.
They are run day and night. The rice
is cut with binders and threshed just
like wheat. The average yield this
year is 9O bushels per aero and it's
bringing from 85 to ?1. 10 per bushel.
After it leaves the farmer's hands it
goes to rice mills, (Stuttgart having
two line mills) and is prepared for
table uso. Tho land that grows this
rice, ten yonrs ago sold for $3.00 per
acre, now it brings from $75 to $100.
This land Is excellent for natural hay,
cow peas, winter oats, Irish potatoas
(two crops) nd sweet potatoes and a
very good corn country. Further south
cotton is Ihe main product. The lum
ber industry Is large, an unlimited sup
Mrs, Ida Nottingham was visiting
tier cousin, Miss Ida Dutschke, of Holt,
last Sunday.
Mrs. Pollie Dutschko returned home
last week after spending several days
with her sons, James, of Louisville, and
Charlie, of Stephensport.
Jasper Head, pf Louisville, spent the
week end near Lodlburg.
C. C. Grant started to Arkansas last
Tuesday for a hunt and to visit his son,
Claude.
George Adklsson, o'f Lewlsport, was
the guest of his sister, Mrs, C. C.
Grant, last week.
Mrs. Henry Gibson was the guest of
relatives nt Patesvllle last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Hoard, of Garfield, were
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Willie Parr last
Sunday.
Ed. Croush, of Frym're, has rented
the property of Flake Ater, and will go
Into the dry goods business In this place.
Success to Mr. Croush. We are glad to
have such men with us.
FinUhed 1:55
Wcdnoaday.
PAGES.
cm look squire in the eye, the An-
there was one here Sunday night
Mr. Smith's splendid address.
NT - S - A - S
Mrs. J. M. Fitch
Described
ply of oak, hickory, 'gum, pine and cy
press. The country Is full of sawmil s
preparing it for market. One large
mill which is doing a flourishing busl
ness, having gone there from Breck n
ridge County, Kentucky, 8 months ago.
Mowers. Coss & Grand forming the
company.
Wages are good in the shop and on
the farm and a good demand for men.
It's been an old saying "That you will
die If you go to Arkansas." I never
-aw a more healthy nor a more hosnlt-
,ible people than I found there. We in
fact, fell in love with the country and
people, but with all of old Kentucky's
faults, we love her still. We visited
Lottie Rock and found a modern city
situated on the picturesque Arkinsas
river which Is sjnnned by four bridges.
We visited the new Capitol that has
jut been finished at a cost of four
million dollars. It s a handsome build
ing and speaks well for the "Arkan
sawyers". After seeing those things
we wended our way toward home and
was glad to set foot on Kentucky soil,
where the sun shines the brightest and
the birds sing the sweetest and politics
is the ah well, we will drop that right
now.
At the News olllce this week, two
bunches of rice are on display. -They
are beautiful and nre attracting much
curiosity. Yours truly,
Mr. and Mrs. J. M, Fitch.
On Sunday the 1 th Henry Beard, of
Webster, was buried at Walnut Grove
cemetery. On Wednesday, I3 the two
months old child ot Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Brown was buried, and on Thursday, 11
Mr. Dick Cooms was buried at Ray
mond cemetery.
Gabe Taul was in our town one day
last week testing the scales. Found all
In Lodiburgall right.
Child Welfare Conference.
Parents, teachers, public spirited citi
zens of every walk in life are tircl tn
attend the Child Welfare Conference to
be held at tne Louisville Armory begin
ning Thursday, November 21 and con
tinuing for the remainder ofNnvmh
This Is a movement that is engaging
w.u mi cmiuii 01 our nooiest men and
women, women and men who are de
voting their money, time and best ef.
forts to the betterment of child life.
Let every teacher and mother In Ken
tucky make a desperate effort to attend
the conference and brine home in h.
community good that only time can tell.
Subrcrlbe Today! Now!
Thanksgiving Dinner
At Yobinsport School
The ladles of the M. E. church of
Toblnsport will serve dinner in the
basement of the new High School
building Thanksgiving, Thursday, Nov
2.. Everybody Invited. Come nnd en
joy a good country dinner, only 23c
COMEDY IN TJOOKSTORE.
Queer Experience In an Attempt to
Buy a Hare Work.
A rorrrspotidt'iit of tin- (lluxgow Her
ald contribute- tin following iitniixliift
account of an tittempl to buy it rare
tWik:
JH his "Autocrat or the llrcnkfimt
"jBllo" Oliver Wendell Holmes men
tMs rf curioUK book railed "Thinks 1
to Myself" 11 linvlng been written and
published Iri England by n person of
quality nbout the tiepliitiliiR of the hint
century. Some time ngo. ainoiiK n
number of seeotidluind book exposed
for sale outside 11 nlmp In Glasgow. I
noticed one In elegant but faded bind
ing It was --Think I to Myself." In
two thin volumes. The first sentence
took my fancy:-"1 was horn of very
worthy, honest nnd respectable parent
-nt least I think so!"
I went into the shop with the vol
umes nnd nsked the old man of the In
terior. "Whnt Is the value of these?"
lie turned them over carelessly and
said: "These are of no use to me:
they're Just o much waste paper."
This struck tne 11s an original way of
selling books, ntul I grave' responded.
"Very well how much for them, then 7"
"Three ha'pence." lie said. "F'er vol
ume?" I asked. "For the two." he re
plied, whereupon I put the books Into
my pocket and handed him the money.
lie looked nt me wonderlngly and in
quired. "Where did you get thetn?"
"Outside, ut the door." "Why." he
gasped. "I thought you were selling
them!"
ASKED FOR A CRITICISM.
The Lecturer Got a Reply and a Big
Surprise as Well.
Mr. Albon V. Man, the American
scientist who Invented Incandescent
lighting by the use of 11 carbon lilament
In n vacuum, when he was about sev
enty years of age looked more like a
banker than a .scientist apd In the sub
dued light of a lecture room appealed
at a distance like a youug man.
Some years ago he attended a lec
ture In Brooklyn upon tho higher prob
lems of electrical science, delivered by
a "professor" with many titles and de
grees. At the Hose tho speaker, called
for comments and ciitlclsms from the
auditors.
Mr. Man. who was sitting well back
In the hall arose and. quoting a long
statement from the lecture concerning
a dlfllcult process, asked If- he had
heard it correctly.
"With remarkable accuracy, sir." re
plied tho lecturer. "They aro almost
my very words."
The Inventor then clearly but cogent-,
ly tore the lecturer's argument to
pieces, greatly to the latter's astonish
ment and to the amusement of the au
dience. As he sat down the lecturer
said:
"I can hardly reply at present Yow
seem to have some Information on the
subject."
"Yes." replied Mr. ,Mnn. "1 discov
ered the process myself nearly thirty,
years ago." Pearson's Weekly.
Learning His Father's" Business. "
"What?" exclaimed the wealthy
Cleveland pupa who hud put his son to
work In order to teach him u few
things. "What? Fired after working
one week?"
"Yes. dad; I was discharged."
"What was the trouble?"
"They said I was ton green for
'them."
"What was your mistake?"
"I paid 11 bill the (lrst time the col
lector called!"
"Aha! And now you see how foolish
you were,'" -
"Yes. dad I'll never do it again."
"My son. you have served your up
prentlceshlp mid learned your lesson.
Von may now come Into the olllce with
me "-Cleveland IMulu Dealer
Her Secret Sorrow.
"Mrs. Whltlley Impresses mo as one
who had something In her past life to
make her unhappy. I never can look at
her without feeling that she Is tho
bearer of a secret sorrow of some
kind."
"Well, she Is. She told mo onc.o thnt
she could never bo qulto happy again
because slio used to bo tho wlfo of a
man who later married another woman
with whom ho appeared to bo living lu
a stato of bliss." Chicago Record-Herald.
It Would Come.
"I'd llko to go away for the rest of
tho week, sir." said tho tired book
keeper. "There Is no need for you to do
that" replied tho employer. "Stay
here, and the rest of tho week will
come to you."
Earthquakes.
The worst shaken countries of the
world aro Italy, Japan, Greece, South
America, Java, Sicily and Asia Minor.
Tho lands most freo from earthquakes
aro Africa, Australia, Russia, Siberia,
Scandinavia and Canada. As a rule,
wbcro earthquakes are most frequent
they aro also the most severe. But
to this general statement thcro aro ex
ceptions, Indian shocks, though less
numerous, being often very disastrous.
Loss pf life, however, in many cases,
depends on density of population rath
er than on the intensity of tho earth
movement New York American.
WHEN HARMON WAS A BOY
Example of Shrewdnett That the Av
erage Mother Would Meet With
Stern Correction.
Gov. Judeon Harmon of Ohio,
though a fearless speaker on occa
sion, is equally noted for his preg
nant silences. When he was a small
boy In an Ohio village 'his chief play
mate was another small boy named
Dil.
Among tho legitimate objects of
boyish foray tho pair at one time
gave their attention to a supply ot
fruit which Judson's mother had
stored In a cherished recess. When
Mrs. Harmon finally discovered that
tho fruit was diminishing she prompt
ly attributed tho loss, with a mother's
partiality, to her son's playmato,
whose roguish traits wero glaringly
apparent to her.
Dill at his next visit received her
vigorous denunciation without afflrma.
tlvo or denial, though not without
glances ot indignant inquiry at Jud
son, who stood silently by, with a
simulation of surprlso and regret
As soon as tho boys had escaped to
tho yard, Dill, In righteous wrath at
tho supposed treason of his pal, burst
out:
"Look here, Jud! Wero you ornery
enough to lay tho blnmo o that steal
In' on to me?"
"Courso not!" Jud replied. "What do
you tako mo for?"
"Well, it looked mighty llko you had,
when you stood there all tho time
n-sayln' nothln'."
"Yes, Dill," admitted Judson, with a
cautious glanco toward tho house.
"Hut as long as thero's any fruit left,
let 'em suspect you. If they're all tho
time watchln' tho outside I can be
usefuller on the Inside. See?" Judge.
PLAN TO USE OCEAN WATER
Engineers of California City Have
Project Which Does Credit
to Their Ingenuity.
9
This city Is considering a unlquo
plan for solving the serious water
problem which It faces. The supply
Is already Inadequate, and an applica
tion for a part of tho Owens river
from Los Angeles has not been grant
ed. Now it Is proposed to distill
ocean water for domestic purposes,
and the municipality may purchase
the Burning mountain, several miles
up the coast in the Santa Monica
range, for use as a heating plant. It
Is believed the sea water could bo car
ried through a U" pipe deep to tho
hot Interior of the smoking hill and
distilled at practically no cost. Power
might be produced, some engineers
think, that would enable tho muni
cipality to maintain an electric light
ing plant. Santa Monica Correspon
dence San Francisco Chronicle.
Crosses Lake on Water Shoes.
A German cabinet maker has con
structed a pair of water shoes with
tho help of which ho walks upon the
water. He has already crossed Lako
Amner, In Bavaria, 12,000 feet wide,
In two hours.
These water shoes are really two
long, narrow boxes of pine wood,
squared off at the rear end' and shaped
like the bow of a boat in front. To
preserve his balance the traveler
grasps two upright posts. At the outer
edge of each boat or shoe three small
paddles, shaped like rudders, are fast
ened. Theso move on hinges and are
worked by a sliding mechanism that Is
operated by tho traveler pushing his
feet forward alternately, like a boy
learning to skate. He can travel rap
idly and with safety on smooth water,
although tho apparatus Is probably not
fit for uso In stormy weather. Those
who havo tested it assert that It does
not tax tho strength as much as row
ing a moderately sized boat The in
ventor uses his "water shoes almost
every day far crossing tho lake and
transporting his tools and a moderate
amount of luggage.
Woman Bank President.
Mrs. Elizabeth Davidson has tho dls.
tlnctlon of being tho only woman bank
president in the stato of Malno and
the fourth in this country. Tho bank,
was founded 19 years ago and for 13
years continued under tho same man
agement and in tho samo small rented
room. Tho first president dying, tho
directors elected Mrs. Davidson to
tako his place. It was such a small
matter that they wero willing to trust
It to a woman. Mrs. Davidson went
into the business with such vim that
tho deposits increased from hundreds
to thousands and tens of thousands.
From ono rented room the bank quar
ters, increased steadily, and a short
time ago it was moved into a fine new
building erected for it. Mrs. Davidson
attends every meeting of tho directors
arid keeps in close touch with every
detail ot tho business.
When Right 8eemed Wrong.
Drown, a stranger in a Canadian
city, stopped a pert looking newsboy
and asked directions to a well-known
park. He grew wrathy as he repeat
ed the urchin's instructions.
"Take any old street car," Brown
echoed.
"Yea."
"And at the end of the line change
to the first young street car. Is that
what you said?"
"Yes," answered the boy with a
grin. Then he shied off at the gentle
man's gesture toward his cheek.
"You'd better run," Brown called
after him; "you needn't try your
smart tricks on me, or I'll thrash you."
He walked away, stopped at a news
dealer's to buy a city guide, and found
the directions to the park as follows:
"Take any Olde street car to the end
et line, then change to Yonge."
To Remind You
Thip season of tho year i9 tho time Voiir houso needs a
now roof or tho old ono needs icpfliring. It is tho boat time,
to paint, to put up puttering or clean and repair the old dries
to got tho fall rains in your cistern, which .'may also need
patching. To havo you a now homo built to cat Christmas
dinner in. To tuako somo nico concrcto walks' around youH
place. To look after your chimneys nnd flues and seo if they
aro safo for tho winter fires. I do all of tho above, but if
you prefer to do tho work, Jet mo flguro with you on the
material. A full and complcto lino of all kinds of
Lumber, Windows, Doors, Nails
and Building Hardware, Brick,
Lime, Sand, Cement, Shingles,
Laths, Plaster, Galvanized Tin and
Rubber Roofing, Guttering
Paints, Oils, Varnishes and Interior Finishes. All
Kinds Frames and other Planing Mill Work to order.
AURI0N WEATHERH0LT, Cloverport, Ky.
"-i"
5 C
0
Tax Payers Take Notice
Clf you have not paid your State
and County tax by Dec. 1912 there
will be 6 per cent added and then
it must be paid immediately for the
reason that the State must be set
tled with. CDo not let this extra
cost go on your taxes and then
blame someone else for your own
negligence. dCome in, office
next door to Post Office.
R. O. PERKINS, D. S.
Clovjerporf, Ky.
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EH? Kxiravagnnce Is. one of those Insidious habits that creep upon us and
tnkts nwi our money, wastes our time and rob.s us of a comfortable old
ane. Those snvill sums that we fritter away fmm week to week, would
look very handsome a few yeais from now In the bank. After you have
started a bank account, you will filnd that it Is no sacrifice to deny your
self many 'f the useless pleasures that really eat up so vast an amount of
money.
Let Our Bank be Your Bank
"Total Resources, Including Trust Investments S600.0COOO''
THE BNK OF MaRDINSBURG & TMhT CO. Ilardinsbur, Ky.
J. C. PAYNE INSURANCE AGENCY
1RVINOTON, KENTUCKY
Represents the Leading Companies in the Country
FIRE, LIGHTNING, TORNADO AND CYCLONE '
Insures Baggage and Personal Effects of Travelers. Household Good
and Merchandise in .transit. Your business solicited.
If it's your ambition to
place of any kind get full information of all avail-, f
able property by making use of The Br e eke uridyl
News Real Estate Ads.
3 C
HOE
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HOE
own a farm or a country
HOE
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