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Crittenden record-press. (Marion, Ky.) 1909-191?, November 28, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069460/1912-11-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XXXV MARION. CRITTENDEN COUNTY. KY.. THURSDAY MORNING. NOV 28. 1912. NO. 22.
BIG" FIRE SWEEPS ? OE ao e aOl BEAUTIFUL WEB-
SEVERAL RIDINGS VCt?C9. "' iff DING WEDNESDAY
MX. 'OC. I iM1 TMIOHKU
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Fire of Unknown Origin Burns Out
Two Business Houses and Two
Residences on N. Main St.
GAME NEAR BEING LARGER.
Last Friday night, just before
midnight, the fire alarm whistle
called the fire fighters from their
downy beds of ease, to fight a
stubborn blaze which had broken
out in the Pierce produce brick
building on north Main street.
The building was occupied by C.
R. Njwcom, Grocery and Produce
dealer on the ground floor
andSValentine Threlkeld's colored
barber shop up stairs, also the
colored Lodge and sleeping
rooms. Opinions differ as to
where the fire started, some say
it originated up stairs, others
downsians. The produce building
was scon a mass of flames
and quickly gutted and the
flames leaped to the large frame
stable owned by Pierce & Son and
occupied by Eskew Bros, and
extended the entire length of the
block on the south and to John
B. Grissom's residence on the
north, both of which were quickly
devoured. The fire then
seized for its prey McConnell'd
frame building on the south and
Seldon Hughes' house on the
north occupied by S. S. Woodson
and both were soon reduced to
ashes. Tins grocery stock of C.
R. Newcorn and, in fact, all the
contents of the brick produce
house were lost, but all the live
stock and harness, and most of
the feed and vehicles in the stable
were saved. The people
turned out well and helped the
poor sufferers save their household
goods, and but little furniture
was lost. A telephone pole
which burned down came near
striking City Marshal Loyd and
had it done so he would have
been instantly killed. He dodged
sufficiently to miss the pole
but the cross arm hit his leg, almost
breaking breaking the bone
and he wa3 scratched considerably
by the wires. He was assisted
to an empty buggy standing
near and two townsmen grasped
the shafts and drew him to his
home where he has since been
confined to his bed and where his
physicians say he must remain
for ten days longer. Thos.
McConnell, the merchant, received
a severe cut over his eye and
there were several others who
narrowly escaped injury. Fred
Hughes, colored, came near being
roasted alive in his bed.
Before the carnival of the fire
was checked the money loss was
heavy; Pierce & Son, stable,
$4000, insurance, $1000. J. P.
Pierce, producequse, $4000, insurance,
$2000. J. B. Grissom,
residence, $1500, insurance $900.
Seldon Hughes, residence, $900,
insurance, $500. W. T. McConnell
store room, no insurance.
C. R. Newcorn, loss on stock and
fixtures, $2000, insurance $1500.
The Marion Electric Light &
Ice Co., suffered the loss of much
service wire, several poles and
other item. As soon- as- the Li
wires burned into, the plant was
closed down until the section in
volved could be cut out, after
which service was resumed in all
other parts of the city, with an
intermission of only one hour.
As, soon a3 material could bej
hauled op from the company's
depot the repairs were rushed
and completed in 12 hours from
t? Continued,
0i 'Page 8. '
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Copyright!
Men! The Maker's Guaranty
Goes With the Clothes We Sell
NKING mn no long r buy thir c : : h s in a. haphazard way.
They consider not only th price and ths rtailr 's claim of quality
and service but the maker as well.
It means a lot of difference, in the quality you get in your Fall suit
or overcoat, whether the maker is actually known to be behind his
products or hides identity behind the retailer, thus escaping public responsibility. In offering these
KIRSCHBAUM CLOTHES
we s.tand ready to meet every claim we make. The maker's
"All Wool" guaranty is iron-clad. We know there is not
a thread of cotton in any KIRSCHBAUM garment we sell.
The fact that every KIRSCHBAUM suit and overcoat
is hand-tailored from fabrics shrunk and reshrunk, was a
clinching factor in our choosing the KIRSCHBAUM line.
We know absolutely that our customers will be satisfied,
Kirschbaum Suits
$10 to $18
The. Kirsehbaum Specials iat $10, $12.50
Are the greatest values in America
Main Street
aoc
tgu A. D. KIRSCHBAUM & CO,
McConnell
iocioc
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. mKchbaum Gomes.
A1XOOU MAWT1UMH
That they can walk out of ourstore anv day with garments
that will be as well-shaped and as perfect in style six
months hence under ordinary wear, as on the day of
All our stylps are individual and authoritative. Perfect
in cut, color and weave. The KIRSCHBAUM label means
your money back should you find any imperfection in fit,
cut or fabrics.
Kirschbaum' Overcoats
$10 to $18
&
Nunn
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and $15
Marlon, Ky.
JOE
Grand "Thanksgiving Eve" Event
Was The Marriage of Miss Ina
Price to Mr. Virgil Kcoie
ARE VERY POPULAR COUPLE.
Wednesday morning at the
Presbyterian Church, U. S. A.
the marriage ceremony of Mr.
Virgil Yandell Moore and Miss
Dorothy Ina Price was
in a most impressively beautiful
ceremony. Promptly at 9:30
o'clock, the bridal party arrived
and the sweet tones of L he-grin's
Bridal Chorus pealed forth
in sweetest tones frrm the piano
where Mrs. Marshall Jenkins'
presided, announcing the fact
to the audience which taxed the
capacity of the church. Mr. N.
G. Rochester and Miss Elmor
Carr led the march, followed by
Prof. V. L. Christian ana Miss
Ell sGray. then came Miss AHie
Mae Yates the maid of honor
with the four beautiful little
flower girls, Misses Robeita
Moore, Elizabeth McAdarrs, Vivian
Yates and Gladys Bakr. The
bride was given away by her father
Rev. Jas. F. Price, and they
came down the left aisle and
met the groom and his best man
Mr. W. H. Townsend of Lexing-ten,
Ky., at the altar, thej having
marched down the right
aisle. In front of the altar the
groom accepted the bride fiom
her father and they stood facing
the'pastor, Rev. Wallace . Clift
who united them with the beautiful
ritual of the Presbyterian
Church, It was one of the prettiest
weddings ever seen in Marion.
The bride w ho is one of
Marion's brightest and sweetest
girls wore the bridal veil over
her wedding dress ot white satin
charmeuse entrain and carried
on her arm a boquet of bride roses.
The groom wore the conventional
black. Miss Allie Mae
Yates, the maid of honor was
gowned in white silk marquisette
over white satin and carried a
shower boquet of cream roses.
Miss Ellis Gray, one of the
brides maids wore satin and carried
pink bride roses. Miss Elmer
Carr of Evansville, the other
bridesmaid, wore dev drop
beaded satin and also carried on
her arm a large boquet of pink
bride roses. The jour flower
girls were dressed in pii.K silk
mulle and eacd carried a swinging
basket of white and pink
chrysanthemums. The church
was decorated in pink and white
tne color scheme of the wedding
and the mellow glow of the
white satin electric lights enveloped
in pink added to the entrancing
scene. After the ceremony
I he happy couple drove to
the home of the bride's parents,
where the bride donned her
traveling dress, after which
they proceeded to the 11 o'clock
train and departed for Louisville
Lexington, and other points in
the east on a bridal tour. The
bride who was born and reared
here and is unanimously loved
was the recipient of bridal gifts
innumerable, comprising --the
beautiful' useful and ornamen
tal usually presented on such oc
casions. When they return
from their bridal trip they will
go to house keeping in their lovely
house on Depot street "which
the groom recently purchhed
and whi ch ia'ftuwjlied for ,tliem'
even to the.injnuUrtfieUuy, v ;
The st&rto their )MttvrW ,
voyage, is with ,
Droepects ana.the Mrtswwhfi
.. a aoetef fnendsb .
&X, - v &X:&f: .1$ J6 T? '
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