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The Mt. Sterling advocate. (Mt. Sterling, Ky.) 1890-current, November 11, 1919, Section One, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069675/1919-11-11/ed-1/seq-4/

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IMUMtTlM
MftMrtV VaPE BlH"
RIP
PLE SUITS
7W SMARTEST FROM FIFTH AVENUE
"They've got the little short Ripple Coats"
."And they axe rcore or less high waisted"
"They are real tight fitted"
"And they've got long .narrow slashed skirts"
"They are certainly different from ordinary clothes"-
SALE PRICE
if
$35.00 S4i
All Sizes. You Ccn Be Stylish Too
i
Vkt wtwW 7 take K a
Mtf vt tke erct a4r f ae
H wtre fevrrd U xe jwi a4 j
L4 a$?rQxkBU,y a fcK kac M fearf
yrrlf wit Ittlawte feet!
TS i4a csaae t ere
rattocs wtr frfinrt
Ike caH of sr af a
limtr. TW rid ww bU ;;
KM tota aft tr twa terfwfcea aarf
eaaM'aet iWy a MTti. Tke r
Tara Mk-fcttfe Kill Mi. m K w
cectaia that a kftlf kwor !! w
tke rtrwy' Vc arty
tiaet" crew t reasaia tar a
"kelp tfceaMctTes."
Tal t what hafcaea:
(Me seBor teek a katfe. fark a4
fea f tke User's test t&rer.
An arrfttaat payartw. wfca writes
a 4Srj la ea4 hears. I fear kaa-
of tyyewrHer ffwr.
A petty etacer tke eatfee half
kw trrlB-r to rrt&rrre a haaawwae
I clock la tke cpjr-Jeck atiaiag safes.
bat came away exapty-haB4ed.
A cook took a carving kaf e.
Another cook took as eay chafe.
i A petty officer took an aratfai rf fee
table linen for bis mother.
M&ny sailors took blaaket.
fce Mp" crew were eosteat with
J IfMVBMMfnCCMY jj
"Oar aaotieaaatiaa a ife war -'
''MMf ataaM aWWlMaJ MaC- WaT WI '
uik Jirti m alkr H. It art
mbAbAm f VataSBHI '
1
era.
j eWce tibet it are m
a4 aHT94ta ta a JMacv kdi ka
9tKV wU TJI W&tWK-n Jam aaa"WaM
t ga m, if -we , jajktl. ej
rf laWrtr a4 ml L
"We MMwnif i t ke wA i4y
ta a Tray qwrie, s aHwij -aitfi-
VtS CawPBarw PL VarW
1 ftwM IT iZVsvWC ? CtffcWrBw
t-vartiiT C jilmiratiea m trae
I . j.A . -..
T5tjiefT, f i aaajin. vm. vl h
j Uit-ir oait pc-voz-J kit.
la sadiuua tw csaal crtlclrs la a
Hint's IIain? scions aad caWs. hre
were anumjoblles on board, rlctrola.
plzsos and a porter's safe of tke latert
model. HoKrerer, nobody 5eeiocd to
want them, and tnej went down with
th, ship.
t
CLOAK &SUT
JIALV ST XEAK IIROADWAY
2iV
9 MmJL.
f ataT 5 -X
rfSTOfry
iwAKY CARILLONS WERE SAVED
Farooui Bell cf Belgiam st Alt De
stroyed by Hun Rava-cc of
the Country.
Thinking of pe- re ciemer'aK the
United Stat1 tfiil be the richer for
the ptjf & at catWeai, tiiote ?l
otic brtl-iifame?, cs they might be
clUd. fur which Kelginm ts-aj. aiid
fcapjiliy can ulll le -famous. Many of
bi-r carillon, vrith rom 33 to 52 bells,
randnc from little ones that welsh
onH n few rtounds to hlz ones of &x
' or seven ton. were destroyed by shell
fire or enemy spoliation, but some of
' tli' best hare survived uninjured. jnA
A bells of Ieshein were taken away by
i the Germans and recaptured ao
brought hack by the Brltit-b. The
carillon of Malines survived In a tow
er that was seven times hit by artil
lery; but the keyboard was manlier!
from which Josef Benyn, one of tke
greatest lell-masfers in the wortd.
bravly rang out the national alrf
I-Igiura while the Invaders were ffy
tins ready to enter the town. Afl
now the carillon of Mallnes? can je-
mni Its Interrupted weekly concerts.
ilVIt f-awa.ea . BalM la n aar i
, fewd ta ke caayact f lite firiJaal i
, forces tkat Mst free aaes f ererr
Inattoa fraai every Haverihy aoaaace.
j It is thus thai a new rote sad new
( rcspoTisikiliry kave cesee ta thi great
, nalioB that w hosar anil whfch
would all wish to tiff to yet hiefcer
levels of service asd achievement.
"The stasre is set, the destiny disclosed-
It has come about by bo plan
of oar conceiving, but by the hand
of God who led us into this way. TVe
cannot turn bacn. We caa only go
forward, with lifted eyes and fresh
ened spirit to follow the vision. It
was of this that we dreamed at our J
Art rin Omtrnuj
vZMMfflvJPyMM1"
Dorothy GIsh
ailfil
"I I
in
Get Him Yet"
A Paramount Picture .
a w
A rWte Direetea fcy Saw Cf flaa ry by nrry Carr-JTrtto-graa4ed
by Jab Leeaer Teabwieal Direeter, Leifb K 9mMk -,.
!nt dard M jilrid! She couldn't nwike aim leva
ler Iece s wm a bloated railroad magnat-i-and h
nted railrMd m&gn&tml
On, fTerneBt ownership! Where w thy stiHf for Dor
thv Gk in Til Get Him Yet!" " . .'
Oa Saje Bill
PATHE NEWS
Prices 10 and 20c Plus Tax
3
The Tabb Theatre
birth. America &hall in truth show
the way. The light streams npon the '.
path ahead, and nowhere else."
, (From "Wbodrow Wilson's address to
' the United States Senate, pre-
sentinj the peace treaty of Ver-1
sallies, in the Senate Chamber,!
July 11, 1919.) !
FARM FOR SALE
j ICO acres of land on llaysville'
pike. Will sell tracts of C5 or 95
' acres, or all in one tract. See
(19-2t) BEX HALL.
m
, Manhattan Shirts at The Walsh Co
THE J. P. TAYLOR CO.
The J. P. Tayor Redrying Plant
will open the season here after the
first sale on the tobacco market,
whieb will be on December 3rd. Har
ry L- Stephenson, of this city, will
be in charge as manager ofthe plant.
Roger L. Swain, of North Carolina,
will buy for the Taylor company this
season, succeeding D. W. Hunter,
who will buy for the company on the
Lexington market P. J. Sipes will
again be in" charge of the company's
books. The J. P. Taylor company
bought 35 per cent, of the weed sold
in the Carolinas this season, and it
is expected that this company will
be heavy buyers here.
Since entering the employ of the
J. P. Taylor Company 3Ir. Steplicfl
son has made quite a reputation for
himself and is considered oae of the
most efficient men in its service.
Xew maecaroni and spaghetti at
Vnnarsdell's.
Rev. R. C. Goldsmitn will return
from Bracken county, where he is en
gaged in a meeting, and will fill his
pulpit at the Baptist church Sunday
morning and evening.
Stacy Adams Shoes
R. E. Punch & Co. '
Buy Boys' Shoes here an,d save;
The Walsh Co.
Raincoats. R. E. Punch & Co-
STORY OF LOST BATTALION deal almost exclusively with the
HOST ROMANTIC OF WAR charge and fciege of one of the lost ( one of which, Just before Die war.ilK
companies that faced the Huns along W have had an audience or at
has come than that of the famous
Lofet Battalion, and of the ringing
answer nade to the Germans by the
imerieaa -omnjander when they de
the Argonne and who made that
classic everlasting answer.
"The Girl Who Stayed at Home"
is the new production, which will
be shown at the Tabb Theater for a
ii..t v) ruvi
I
Had Imltstlon Submarine Target.
The fkill With which the American
punner? frustrated the attacks of JJ
boats was due. In a lnrge measure, jto
the uie of an lnsenlous tarcet for mn
mantled hu surrender. It has been J run of Tuesday, November 17. It was i-ractlce during th voyaces assertf a
. . .,-,, m , . writer in Popular Mechaulcs Jla'a-
wntten by to. t,. . layior anu is , ,in. . Thf dpvlce consisted of a frarrie-
told in tor" and in many columns of
aewspaper print. The men of the
battalion have been pictured in the
dailies and in the weekly news reels
of the moving picture theaters, but
itlias remained! for. David Wark Grif
fith to immortalise that story by im
pfefeffing it in the indelible celluloid
of a photodrama.
The new Griffith pifturc Is not a
war play. It has in its plot some
things that have to do with war and
there are home battle scenes shown
that arc said to be the best yet
screened, especially one of a night
attack when the parachute flares
and a box barrage are seen working
aimultaneously. The short chapters
that deal with the actual fighting,
played by Griffith players, headed , work, about 30 feet long and five fjrt
t. t i if t wide, built to be drawn through tire
by Robert Harron, who presents a ' ;. wJth fln nm,ton conn,ng tou
G
DOROTHY
I S
H
IN
"I'll Get Him Yet"
T5T
o
R
O
H
" I'LL
GET
H I M
YET"
PAltAMOUNT
PICT HE
A steaming story
of the rlrl who
thought she could
follow the tracks
of her railroad to
"Lovevllle"
TABB
THUB8DAY
puKni to and aec
character he has never before at
tempted, but winch is said to fchow
a versatility in this actor that even
he himself had never dreamed existed.
THE SICK
ler and periscope mounted on the upper
side. It was drawn behind the ship
by means of two cables attached one
above the other. By pulling on-tpe
upper one, the upper side of the frame
was made to project forward, causlnc
the target to rise to the surface, while,
by pulllnjy on the lower cable the de
vice would quickly submerge. Office
out of slsht of the Ktinners manipu
lated the apparatus, frequently chang
ing the range by paying out or taking
In the cables.
Clyde Wright is able, to be out
after a mild case of diphtheria.
Norman Horton, who underwent
nn operation for appendicitis at the
Good Samaritan Hospital in Lexing
ton last week, is improving nicely.
MICKIE SAYS
w ever'oodn KNCVN HOV
MANN OP TWB It'U WAN? A.OS
ARC NAAKIN' GOOD. VJtX) Be
PfUNTlN' MORE M VMt DO. TMEf
ANf mers to.eo-r JAAIHN1
SOMt OF 'EM ATTRACT MOU ,
k ATTC4TON "THAN A MULt ,
tM A TIN BfcHN
Unpopular Job.
Few persons were desirous of qual
ifying for the task of destroying 24,000
pounijs of dynamite and other high ex
plntlves, stored until recently In nn
abandoned magazine. The unpopular
ity of the Job was Increased by the
fact that a previous attempt to burn
the explosives had resulted In detec
tions so violent that the experiment
ers fled. Finally an expert was em
ployed who carefully opened each box
with a woeden wedge and mallet and
examined the contents. In most cases
he found that the material could be
destroyed by dumping It on the
ground, saturating It with oil, and
then lighting it with a fuse that per:
toltted withdrawal before explosions,
took place.
Asphodel as Source of Alcohol.
Tbtt asphodel, which contains much
starch In Its tubers, grows as a com
mon weed (porrazzo) In many parts
of Italy la fact, It has been called
"the plague of the Mediterranean." At
one time It was cultivated us a source
of Industrial spirit, but owing to diffi
culties In the rectification the culture
whs abandoned. If these difficulties
could bo overcome Italy would be able
to considerably Increase her home buj
ply of spirit.
Motortruck on Farm. '
Investigation bhows Unit the motor
ti-uclc Is making longer IiuuN for th
fui tner at n decreuked cobt us com
pared with liorseH.
California Leads In Beans,
According to government figures,
California last year produced more
ilmn half the beuuw in the Uulted
Stttw.J'Utiurj:h Dispatch,
B
AUCTION SALE OF FOUR FARMS
No. 1 Located on Ford's 31311 turnpike, right up against the city limits of Paris, and has on it a
nice six-acre tobacco barn and stable, well fenced and watered by Houston Creek. Has a beau
tiful building site, containing 3C 90-100 acres. We will sell this farm promptly at 2 P. M., and
immediately after this sale we will go to the Galloway farm, just beyond this one, ond is about
one-half mile from the city limits of Paris, and shall Te known as
No. 2, and is owned now 3h Grant Galloway.' This little farm of 20 acres has on it a splendid two
story eight-room residence, with good cellar and cistern at the door, nice young orchard and -all
kinds of outbuildings, school house in corner of farm. There is barn room for ten acres of
tobacco, also good stock barn and corn crib. We regard this the best 20 acres in Bourbon
county, all bottom land, watered by spring and Houston Creek. Don't forget the day and
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13th
AT 2 P. M., RAIN OR SHINE
: ON FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14th
AT 2 P. M., WE WILL SELL f l
No. 3 This farm lies on the Brentsville turnpike and Is a part of the old Noah Spears farm, -124 acres
inore or less, with 4-room cottage, outbuildings and good stock barn, good well at the "house,
nice orchard, 74 acres of this farm is in blue grass, 50 acres in com stubbje, which is to be
sown to rye. This land all lays well and is ready for tobacco, as there has never been any to
bacco grown on this farm. Don't forget this farm will be sold on Friday, November 14th at 3
P. M., rain or shine.
No. 4 Located on the Bryan Station pike, about 8 miles from Paris, 3 mile from Houston Station, 9
miles from Lexington and contains 103 acres, 40 acres lying on tho east sido of tho piko un
improved, 03 acres lies on the west side of the pike and has on it a good old-fashioned resi
dence with five rooms, with all kinds of outbuildings, good cistern and well, fine orchard
stable and stock barn. This farm is all in blue grass and timothy except 30 acres winch is
sown to wheat and ryo. This farm lays well and is the best watered farm in the county, and
belongs to Mr. William Case, who has livad on the farm all his life, and has taken splendid
care of it. We will first offer the 40 acres unimproved,, then wo will offer tho 03 acres with
improvements, separately, then we will offer the entire farm of 103 acres as a whole, host bid
accepted. Don't forget the day and date, i4!$WVM-rfi,-i'
SATURDAY," NOVEMBER 15th
AT 10 A. M., RAIN OR SHINE
Remember, all of tho nbove farms will be sold on the premises and we ask" you not to get
confused in the date. '
Remember, Neil and No. 2, on the Ford's Mill pike, will be sold Thursday, No
vember 13th, at 2 P. M.; No. 3, oa the Brentsville pike, Friday, November 14th at
2 P. M and No. 4, at 10 A. M., Saturday, November 15th.
Here is a chance for the small home a ceker. Come out to the sale and buy one of
these farms. Apply
PARIS REALTY CO.
C. P. Maim and H. S. Redmon
512-514 Main Street, Paris, Keatucky.
Office with Lee-Kent Oil Cempany. p. M., rain or sWh.
V v
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JK
'JSr.
-.tSUr'
il . ii Mill i V i ji
rffiBiTaTl
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