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The Bourbon news. (Paris, Ky.) 1895-19??, December 21, 1897, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069873/1897-12-21/ed-1/seq-6/

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THE BOURBON NEWS
Seventeenth Year Established 1881
1 I I II 11
Published Every Tuesday and Friday by
WALTER CHAMP
Mt a - ftwri
Im
THE OLD KITCHEN PUMP
my darter In the city
miles away
From the old New England homestead
westof NarragansettBay
And she brought me up one evenin a tall
new fangled drink
With a straw arisin from it and the color
of it pink
It did me good Im sartin for it didnt do
no harm
And I guess twas full of magic for I saw
the dear old farm
As plain as blazin sunshine and the hill we
call The Hump
And a boy a drinkin water from the old
kitchen pump-
That pump was just plain Iron and that
thirsty boy was me
A drinkin and a drinkin and as dry as
dry could be
The pump was always handy and when a
pump Is nigh
And a small boy is contiguous the boy Is
always dry
Twas on my left in goin out my right in
comin in
And to miss a drink I always felt would
kinder be a sin
There was wheezes in its innards and a
gurgle and a thump
So I always drank to music from the old
kitchen pump
Though Im livin In the city with my dar
ter rich and smart
Im still a plain old farmer and a thirsty
boy at heart
But each year as I grow older my thoughts
go tother way
And I see a little sperrit boy at sperrit
work or play
I want to be that little ghost a standin by
the sink
Id like to tiptoe down once more at night
to get a drink
I must see just one more sunset from the
hill we called The Hump
And have one more drink of water from the
old kitchen pump
C B Mathewson in L A W Bulletin
REBELLION 0F
XUCINDA BOWERS
BY JOHH WALKER HARRUfGTOH
Copyright 1897
mimmNmtwmhwwKWtNfNi
BOWERS looked at the
little invitation card and rebellion
arose in her heart
I dont care she said Im going
All the Ohio village of Valley City
knew that afternoon that Lucinda
Bowers was buying a new dress Mar
garet Elton had seen her purchasing
the organdie at Dorchesters that morn
ing Ben Sturgis met Ruth Ames on
his way home to dinner and told her
just what kind of paper pattern he had
sold to Lucinda
Mrs Benson who had issued cards
for a lawn party on the following
Thursday could hardly have been ex
pected to know who composed so
ciety in Valley City and who was
bevond the pale though several well
disposed persons when they heard that
old Sam Bowers daughter had been
invited would have put in a word in
the right direction had the list been
submitted to them
Mrs Benson means well remarked
Widow Simpkins but she judges
more by a pretty face and a lively
tongue than by family
T should be very grateful said
Young Mrs Benson to Lucinda if you
would help me with the ice cream and
cake at the party next week
Wherever Lucinda went it was ex
pected that she should look after the
comestibles which Valley City called
refreshments She dispensed the
layer cake at the strawberry and ice
cream sociable she filled the candy
bags at Christmas time and attended
to the commissary arrangements at the
annual Sunday school picnics Indeed
Lucinda Bowers had been a burden
bearer from her childhood She paid
the rent and clothed her brothers and
sisters from the wages which she
earned as a school teacher She led the
Christian Endeavor meetings when no
body else would do so She fanned the
faint spark which still remained in the
Womens Missionary society and kept
the sewing circle from disintegration
It seemed as though Lucinda Bowers
had always been old As a matter of
fact she was hardly 25 She might
have been pretty if she had given more
time to sleep and less to care and worry
While the whole town was busy dis
cussing the addition to Lucindas ward
robe the young woman was busy at
work upon her first new dress in two
years The organdie was slipped over
an old skirt of blue silk which had be
longed to her grandmother A few bits
of lace a few lines of tucks a girdle
oi blue silk ribbon and the dress was
done
L suppose remarked Lucinda on
the evening of the party as she looked
at herself critically in the cracked mir
ror of the old walnut bureau that its
wicked for me to spend this money on
dress when Johnny may need a new
pair of shoes before long I wish I
wasnt so rebellious but I cant help
it
The Benson lawn party is still fa
mous in the social history of Valley
City The ambitious young matron who
gave the entertainment was not content
with the grass plot which surrounded
her own pink cottage She took the
lawn belonging to her neighbor as well
Showers of wild flowers hung from the
old cherry tree in the center of the
lawn Chinese lanterns shone from the
fir tree and a genuine Rebeccas Well
o ave forth the most wonderful lemon
ade lemonade fortified with the flavor
ni pineapples and oranges
Yes said Mrs Benson in reply to
the gentle inquiry of Widow Simpkins
1 got the receipt at my home in the
cjisf It if very popular there
She did notthink it necessary to say
thai this marvelous sherbet was
by Uicincla Bowers Neither
did ihe consider it oi any use to tell
nnare
w
Ci
s of the unsightly stains
Ler guests that the arrangement- of
tables under the old cherry tree was
suggested by the young woman in the
blue organdie
The fame of those refreshments
which were served on the night on
which Mrs James Jerome Benson
sprang into social prominence still
lives The angel food a species of
sponge cake was really the best which
had ever been served in Valley City
Even to the present day the matrons
of that town are wont to say Id like
to entertain too if I could make such
angel food as Mrs Benson had at ner
lawn party Mrs Benson has never
explained that Lucinda made the am
brosial confection which was served at
her tables on that memorable night
The divinity who brought order out
of the chaos of ice cream freezers and
cake stands was arrayed in blue or
gandie Lucinda Bowers principally
because she was not aware of the fact
was positively pretty that night Her
cheeks were flushed her eye sparkling
She directed the band of white clad
young girls who carried about the ice
cream laden saucers and handed the
tiny coffee cups to the guests
The attention of those who were
there on that evening was divided be
tween the angel food and a literary
lion from New York He had not been
much of a lion when he went away
from Valley City many years before
Widow Simpkins remembered him
as a red headed bare footed boy who
trudged over the hills with his bucket
of blackberries to sell Since those
days however William Dorrance had
traded bags of wool and sides of bacon
fGr a college education Subsequently
he had wandered to strange lands and
in one of his pilgrimages had unearthed
a long buried city
It was not the city which was of so
much importance but a pavement in
a wonderful state of preservation
which showed that civilization was at
least 2000 years older than any previ
ous revealed So William
would be required to arid their small
j3m f
Wit V rftiii i i
-- - to - - -
t
af L anji rtgg
w
JSL 4B
how you used to hunt arrohwrftt
along the creek
Yes he replied and I remember
that it was at your Suggestion thafll
started to explore an Indian moiind5l
was iust t6n yaw old believe that
it was then that I acquired iuy task
for archaeology
I think replied the girl that we
found a sheeps skull and a mussel shell
I am sure that you owe your career W
me
I
man
zr 1L mm
u
AND THE GIRL IN BLUE ASKED THE EXPLORER
ranee returning from the dusty plains
of the remote east had writtan a book
which caused all previous chronologists
to hang their heads Valley City cared
little for antiquity but here was a man
who had not only written a book but
was talked about in the daily papers as
a great assyriologist and explorer
William Dorrance seemed to have no
very definite idea why he had come
back to the little village He had made
himself believe that he wished to
photograph some of the old places
which he had known in his boyhood
He had gone with his camera to the
old mill to the little house where he
was born and to the cabin on the out
skirts of the village which marks the
spot where the first white man made
his home in Bottle county Yet Wil
liam Dorrance was not satisfied It
seemed to him that he had missed
something which he had unconsciousty
come to seek
Mrs Benson he asked who is
that young woman over there in the
blue gown
You seem to have been exploring
among the layer cakes replied Mrs
Benson That is Miss Bowers a young
lady who has kindly consented to as
sist me this evening By the way pro
fessor have you met the Misses Fletch
er Theyre charming giils
And the girls inblue persisted the
explorer
Nobody knew exactly what happened
but a few minutes later another young
woman was dispensing angei iood
and -others directed the ice cream
lingade
Well I never ejaculated Widow
Simpkins
How little taste remarked Mar
garet Elton these men of science
have Still that blue organdie isnt so
bad considering the fact that its
slipped over a blue skirt Of about the
vear one
Lucinda Bowers went home that
night escorted by Prof William Dor
rance EoV the first time in her busy
work-a-day life she had what the vil
lake young people called a beau The
woman and the man who walked along
the low hedge before the Mrs Bowers
yard did not talk of jCngel food nor
yet of buried cities They spoke of a
place way over beyovid Kinneys hill
where the blackberries grew and the
papaws flourished They talked too
of the days when the hand of the frost
King was iaio upon trie persimmon
and a crystal sheen glistened upon corn
and pumpkin of the days when they
trudged over the field with sacks of un
hulled walnuts speculating as they
walked upon the length of time which
have often thought so said tfie
Vallev City was busy talking the next
dav Then the young women beganto
act They liked each other none too
well but all combined against a com
mon foe Here was one not even rec
ognized in the social register of the lit
tle town who had presumed to attract
the attention of a distinguished ex
plorer
This coalition of social powers at once
began an active campaign There were
drives to the Bock house and Lucinda
was carefully excluded from the list of
guests Prof Dorrance as the drives
were arranged especially for his benefit
could not very well refuse the
tions There was a dance at Dr Hy des
and the name of Lucinda Bowers ap
peared on no dancing card The pro
fessor was there for Mrs Benson who
was a remote relative of his by mar-
riage insisted mat ne muatuuicuu
I rather think said Margaret El
ton to her mother one morning that
the professor has forgotten all about
our young friend of her grandmothers
skirt
But the young women of Valley City
who composed what was known as the
set received invitations that after-
noon which caused them to open their
eyes in astonishment Miss Lucinda
Bowers was to give an afternoon tea
If the brass ball had suddenly fallen
from the cupola of the courthouse Val
ley City would not hare been snw as
tonished
1 didnt suppose said Widow
X
Simpkins daughter that the girl had
three silver teaspoons in the house
The young women of the set took
counsel together over the matter and
decided to go to the tea Of course
none of them had ever invited Lucinda
to a tea but feminine curiosity is
mighty even in Valley City
That Friday afternoon found 15
modishly dressed young women in the
little house in which dwelt Mrs Bow
ers and her five children There was
no silver teapot and the silver spoons
were worn yellow in places but the
napkin on the little tea table was of
snowy whiteness the tea gave forth a
grateful fragrance and the angel
food was of marvellous flakiness
Im so glad said Lucinda as she
toyed nervously with the edge of a
hemstitched napkin that you have all
come to day I have known you girls
since we were children I have some
thing to tell which I want to know
first of ail I am to be married next
month to Prof Dorrance
The young women crowded abouther
and congratulated her loudness of tone
making up for lack of sincerity
I suppose said Lucinda to her
mother after the guests had departed
thai jt wasnt Christian for me to ex
ult over them that way but somehow
when things go so far 1 rebel and I
cant help it
Already Rewarded
The last joke at the expense
of the
French Society for the Protection of
Animals is to the following- effect
A countryman armed with an im
mense club presented himself to the
president of the society and clat5ned
the first prize He was asked to describe
the act of humanity on which he
founded his claim
I have saved the life of a wolf re
plied the countryman I might easilj7
have killed him with this bludgeon-
and he swung his weapon in the air to
the intense discomfort of the president
But where was the wolf inquired
the latter What had he done to you
lie had just devoured my wife was
the reply -
The president reflected an instant
and then said
My friend I am ci the opinion that
you have been sufficiently rewarded
Pittsburgh Dispatch
Mme Miolan Carvalhos statue by
lercie has just been placed over her
grave in the cemetery
She is represented as Marguerite in
Gounods Faust her most celebrated
Part -
-A scientific boxer
G
pe
-
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Tin nrt rPTnprril av acl ml V T I sSS
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THE BOUBBOy NEWg ESBAY DECEMBERS 1897
PRINCE KRAPOTK1NE
Romantic of the Famous llu
Hian Klhilist
- Pnince Krapotkine the nihilist agi
tator is a remarkaible
man with
a re
markable history and the nihilists are
fond of asserting that he has a bet
ter title to the throne of Russia than the
present czar He is directly descended
from the ancient house of Rurik which
ruled Russia for centuries before the
present Germanic dynasty of Romanoff
came upon the throne He was educated
at the colleges of the pages in St Peters
burg which only the sons of members
of the imperial court are admitted and
afterward studied atLeipsic Heidelberg
and Zurich piroving Ms superior schol
arship at each university Upon his re
turn to Russia he was assigned to scien
tific work mnder the government and
shortly afterward became secretary otf
the Imperial Geographical society A
few years later he entered the service
of the court as grand chamberlain to
the wuf e of Alexander II
While he was at Zurich Krapotkine
became infected with socialism and
joined the Society of the International
But he concealed his views and Ms re
lationsandservedatcourt for more than
ten years without being discovered
During the latter part of this period he
was in active communication and par
ticipation with the nihilists in St Pet
ersburg and is said to have planned the
unsuccessful plot to assassinate the era
peror in I860 All this time he managed
to preserve his confidential relations at
the palace was actually in charge of the
person of the empress looked after all
her private affairs employed and dis
changed her servants and attendants
had constant access to the apartments
of the -emperor and was in Ms presence
almost daily But this sort of thing
could not last forever A successful
raid was made upon a nihilistic as
sembly and to the consternation of the
court and the amazement of the whole
empirethe notorious Borodin the most
dangerous and influential agitator in all
Russia for whom the police had been
searching for years and who appeared
and disappeared as if by magic when
his disguise was stripped off proved to
be Prince Krapotkine the trusted serv
ant of the czar and the steward of the
czarinas household
Because of his imperial lineage
Krapotkine was not executed with the
rest of the conspirators but was sen
tenced to perpetual imprisonment in the
citadel of Ste Peter and Paul There he
lay in a dungeon until it was thought
he was dying when he was removed to
a hospital in the city from which
friends assisted him to escape It was
the habit to haul wood into the court
yard of the hospital in the fall of the
year when the gates were kept fre
quently opened to admit the wagons
The physicians having ordered that
Krapotkine should have plenty of air
and outdoor exercise he was allowed to
walk in this court attended by a single
nurse his physical weakness being such
that no one thought he would attempt
to escape Butdt appears that oneof his
attendants was bribed Through him
anVarrangement was made to have a
drosky and swift horses outside the
gates and one day when they were
opened to admit a load of wood Kra
potkine and the nurse slipped out en
tered the vehicle- and were driven to a
place of concealment from which they
finally succeeded in escaping to London
Krapotkine has since been foremost
in the councils of the nihilists and his
rank and record have given him great
influence His speeches in this coun
try however have not added to his
reputation I heard him in Xew York
where his audience was small and indif
ferent His address Tead well but was
delivered without any force and in a
tone of voice that was not audible to
many in the hall In his early days he
was famous for his dramatic and in
flammatory speeches but now he is an
old man feeble and almost decrepit
and has entirely lost the fire of his
youth Chicago Record
SURE SIGN OF PROSPERITY
Old
Clothes Cleaner Knows When
Everyliody Else Is Bnsy
Queer isnt it said the clothes
cleaner to his customer but my busi
ness indicates the depression or pros
perity of trade When times are booming-
I do not have the same kind of cus
tom that I do when they are dull Then
people bring their clothes in here and
ask me to make them look as g ood as
How does your business average this
season asked the customer
It is very promising- said the
er as he routed a moth family irom tne
package before him but that does not
indicate a hard winter but that people
have learned a lesson of economy from
past reverses The indications are that
the wearers of those garments are not
hard pressed I have found money
handkerchiefs gloves theater checks
lots of stuff in pockets that last sea
son came to me as empty as a last years
nest Do you want this opera glass
cleaned
Great Scott no said the customer
taking- it back I forgot all about its
being- in my pocket Thanks
Dont mention it Another straw
that snows which way the winds blow
is this Young men who bring their
garments here to be renovated are not
half so particular about the creases
in their trousers as they were last sea
son Why I suppose they have a new
nan at nome vu j uUJw
like those are very important Here
is the check for your goods Chicago
Times HeralcL
A Mean Ulnslclan
Jay Green Lyman Sawyer is the
meanest man in the county Goi fry
him hes a durned sight worse than a
pirate
Josh Medders Is that so Why 1
never knew him to do anything worse
than to be everlastinly fiddlin
Thats it He asked me to give bin
nv honest opinion of his fiddlin an
jriiei I did o he had m arrested foi
lansruago X Y Joni
njiin profane
71-
------ riiiiiailWMMWIMMMIMMMMTTIMIMMIllWIlWTBTTinTTnir III Hi MBIirTnBIITiTTr i i Till II IIMII 1 1
M t
HARPERS MAGAZINE
PROJECTS FOR A MCARAGrAt CASAL
Bg Hon DA VID TURPIB
EASTERN SinERIA AND THE PACIFIC
jublic that which has made it famous for
will enter the coming year prepared e tc the
WiHEffiW such readiDSas
OUR
PACIFIC PROSPER 1
THE COaMERCUL IHPORTAVCE OF AS ISTHMUS CASAL
By irORTHIXGTOX C FORD
THE DEVELOPJIEXT OK OUR PACIFIC DOXAIH
wTr f r rrxrirra
By STFPIIES BONSAL jfj umamo u
RODENS CORNER THE NOVEL OF THE YEAR
by Henry Setos Mbrriman author of The Sowers Striking novelties in short fiction U
be contributed by such authors as W D Howells Richard Hardng Davis Brander Mthew
Frederic Remington Ruth McEnery Stuart and others There will be a series of articles on
THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE EUROPE POLITICAL AND SOCIAL ARTAND THE DRAMA
ARMIES AND NAVIES STUDIES IN AMERICAN SOCIETY AMERICAN CHARACTER SKETCHES
Postage free to all subscribers in the United States Canada and Mexico
Sub S4 a year Address HARPER BROTHERS Pubs N Y City Send for free prospectus
t
Gen Lew Wallace H S Williams W D Howells Oweu Viter C D Warner
S R Crockett
9 Caspar Whitney
v W D
Howellj
Katlmlne Oe Forest
W D Honelli
during 1898 will present to its readers a faithful pictorial repre
sentation of the worlds most interesting and important news
THE NEWS THAT BECOMES HISTORY
National and inter- The Weekly will continue to mrticiDate
national Politics in the great political events of our coun
Social and Economic
Questions
Industrial Enterprise
Art and Literature
Fashions
A Colored Fashion
Supplement
Cut Paper Patterns
A Bi- Weekly Pattern
Sheet
LONG SERIALS
try It will treat of the social and eco
nomic questions and of the development
of the middle west Its special
snondent in thp TClrmrlilr rprrinn will tnr
the story of the great gold discoveries
LONG SERIALS
AND SHORT STORIES
TwolontrserialswillannpHrrlnrinrr tfn THE RED AXE
year contnoutea oy authors ot inter
Annnl C t w n n3 111 l 11 3
uuuuiidi lame auu win ne illustrated
iyaAlWlAWi
-
1H
Owen Wister
Howard Pyle
John Kendrick Bangs
Mary EWilkins
ASSOCIATED HERMITS
By FRAVK RSTOCKTOX
These and a score of equally prominent
writers will contribute short stories to the
Weekly in 189S making the paper espe
cially rich in fiction Other features are the
DEPARTMENTS AND
THIS BUSY WORLD
By ES MARTIN
LETTERS FROM LONDON
By ARNOLD WHITE
SPECIAL ARTICLES
FOREIGN NOTES
By POULTXEY BIGELOTl
AMATEUR SPORT
By CASPAR WHITNEY
A SPORTING PILGRIMAGE AROUND THE WORLD
In the interest of the Weekly Caspar Whitney is on his way around
the vorld He will visit Siam in search of big game making his
principal hunt fiom IJangkok He will visit India and then proceed
to Europe to prepare articles on the sports of Germany and F ranee
10c a copy send for free prospectus Subscription t00 a year
Postage free in the United States Canada and Mexico
Address IIAlllKIt h I1UOTI1EKS Publishers Nott York City
pared drawings of the advance fashions
of Paris and New York Once a month
the Hazar will issue free a colored
fashion supplement Cut paper patterns
of certain gowns in each number will be
made a feature These will be sold in
connection with each issue at a uniform
price The Bazar will also publish bi
weekly free an outline pattern sheet
AND SHORT STORIES
Two famousauthors will contribute long
serial stories to the Bazar in 1898 The
first deals with Scotch and Continental
scenes the second is a story of a young
girl versatile and typically American
Mary E Wilkins
Octave Thanet
H P Spofford
M S Briscoe
WILD EELEN
By WILLTjtiT BLACK
RAGGED LADY
By r D HOirELLB
These and a score of other equally
prominent writers will contribute
short stories to the Bazar in 1898
making the paper especially rich in
fiction
DEPARTMENTS AND SPECIAL ARTICLES
OUR PARIS LETTER THE LONDON LETTER
By KATHARINE DE FOREST By Mrs POULTXEY BIGELOIV
CLUB WOMEN HUMOR
By MARGARFT If WELCH By JOHV KEXDRICK BANGS
There vrill be a series of articles on Etiquette Music the
Voice Art the Play Women and Men Leaders among Women
Gardening Housekeeping Life and Health Indoor Details etc
10c a Copy Send for Free Prospectus Sub S4 a Year
Postage free in the United States Canada and Mexico
Address HARPER BROTHERS Publishers New York City
Carl Schurz
F R Stockton JA
Henry James
1bJW
William Black
Mary E Wilkins
Octave Thanet
5
T W Hiffginsoa
a thoroughly up-to-date periodical for women will enter upon its
thirty first volume in 1898 During the year it will be as heretofore
A MIRROR OF FASHION
ParS and New York I Each issue will contain carefully pre
O fefefefefeVfeV 9
13
SOME OF THE STRIKING FEATURES FOR 1898
THREE SERIAL STORIES
THE ADVENTURERS
By II Blt RRIOTT MA TSOX
is a thrilling story of a fight for
a treasure concealed in an old
castle in the mountains of Wales
FOUR FOR A FORTUNE
By ALBERT LEE
is a stirring narrative of four
companions who have lo
cated a long lost fortune
SHORT FICTION
THE COPPER PRINCESS
By KIRK MCNROE
In addition to the three long serial stories the publication of which will continue during the entire
Cdr mere wui uc suuu siunoui every kiiiuiii minim is umy jnjbbiuieio mention a ieV titles here
Hunt the Owler
By STANLEY J WEYJTAN
The Flunking of Watkins Ghost
By JOHN KENDRICK BANGS
ARTICLES ON
Elephant Hunting- in Africa
By SYDNEY BROOKS
First Lessons in Tiller and Sheet
By DUDLEY D F PARKER
DEPARTMENTS
The Blockaders
By J AXES BARNES
A Great Haul
By SOPHIE SWETT
1 1 is in the bowels of the earth where
the hero has his adventures and
from where he rescues the Princess
A Harbor Mvsterv
By JOHN R SPEARS
A Creature of Circumstance
By MORGAN ROBERTSON
SPORT TRAVEL ETC
An American Explorer in Africa
By CYRUS C ADAMS
Laying Out a Golf Course
By V G VAN TASSEL SGTPHEN
PRIZE COMPETITIONS
Editors Table Stamps and Coins Photography Short Stories Sketching Photography
10 Cents a Number Send for Free Prospectus Subscription SI 00 a Year
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Address HARPER BROTHERS Publishers Franklin Square N T City
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j vj - - t imciow lurk Munre Jt
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