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The Bourbon news. (Paris, Ky.) 1895-19??, August 25, 1922, Image 1

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PUBLISHED EVERY TUESpAY AND FRIDAY IN THE YEAR.
VOLUME XLII
PARIS, BOURBON COUNTY, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1922
-
ftv Bv BilV ' A Hlr v 1 H
PEESBYTEIAN EDUCATIONAL
CAMPAIGN OPENS THIS
WEEK
THE ROOSTER TED?
In this issue will be found the offi
cial schedule of the Booster Trip,
The Presbyterian movement for
Christian education will open up in
Paris this week. Mr. E. R. Pike,
representing: the city section of the
movement, with headquarters in
Louisville, will arrive here Saturday
and confer with the Presbyterian
church leaders on the work to be
done in this city.
The Presbyterians plan to Taise
$1,000,000 in Kentucky among the
35,000 members of that denomina
tion and this fund will be appor
tioned to Centre College, $300,000;
Presbyterian Seminary at Louisville,
$300,000; Kentucky College for Wo-
THE STRIKE SITUATION
Hopes of a settlement of the rail
way shopmen's strike, which were
Which will be given on Wednesday, held out to the American public
August 30, under auspices of the following the big conference of last
Paris Commercial Club and the mer- 'Friday, appears to have been wreck
chants of Paris. The schedule has -fed completely,
been made up so as to allow for de- i The 148 members of the Associa-
laya at aimerent points. , turn uj. xvcni.wa.jr AetuuvcD, 6oiuv
The ladies of the Presbyterian ' ed from all parts of the country at
church will serve dinner on the' the call of T. Dewitt Cuyler, their
campus at the Millersburg Military chairman, announced after hours of
Institute, to the Boosters, at noon, secret deliberation that they stood
on that day. Tickets for the dinner for surrender by the strikers of
are on sale at the Farmers' Bank their seniority rights. It is known
and the Exchange Bank, at Millers- that when their conference opened
burg, at 75 cents. , !at the Yale Club, Forty-fourth
All indications point to a most Street and Venderbilt Avenue, the
enjoyable day for the Boosters. The Western and Southern executives
relaxation from business cares, the and a number of the Eastern men
put-of-doors trip, meeting and mix- favored conciliatory measures,
iner with the neonle of all sections ! All nrosnects of peace, however,
men, Danville, $200,000; Wither
spoon College, Buckhorn, Ky., $50,- 0f the county, and the entertain- were shattered by the "die-hard"
000; Pikeville College, Pikeville, ment features arranged by the group which for the last few days
Ky., $50,000; and the balance to committees m charge, should mate Had been marsnaiing its . iorces iur
"be apportioned to Matthew T. Scott, tne doy one ot unquanned dengnt. tne purpose oi oDsirucung any wnu
o or peace tnat wouia not muau uio-
TOBACCO BEING CUT PEEMA- rupting of the shopmen's union.
. TUEELY I Persons in a position to speak au
I thoritatively for the shopmen de-
Jr., Academy, Phelps, Ky., Lees Col
legiate Institute, Jackson, Ky.,
and Sayre School, at Lexington.
"It will be seen," says a state
ment from, headquarters, "that we
bave covered every branch of edu
cational work in Kentucky. We
"have the endorsement of our church
leaders and the backing of every
one interested in education. The
situation in Kentucky according to
Dr. Frank McVey, president of the
University of Kentucky, is serious
and everything that can be done to
better educational conditions should
"be aided by all interested in Chris
tian education."
Mr. Pike will arrange at once for
the appointment of local committees
to conduct the actual campaign.
During the work here there will be
a number of visiting ministers,
widely known throughout the Pres
byterian church.
ICE CREAM
Smith's cream packed and deliver
ed at:
60c per quart.
$1.00 per half-gallon.
$2.00 per gallon.
Any one having packers, will
please call 494.
SMITH'S CONFECTIONERY,
(july28-tf) 429 Main St.
o '
Tanlac is a scientific triumph.
Results prove it. Tanlac is sold by
all good druggists. (adv)
Premature tobacco cutting is go- clared that there could be no sepa-
ing on in Bourbon county, as well as rate compromise. They said that
in other counties in this section, the strikers would have to go back
owing to the drouth of unusual se- in a body or not at all.
verity that is prevailing over the The gathering was the third the
Bluegrass. Farmers are cutting executives have held this montn ior
their tobacco wherever the plants the purpose of considering proposals
show signs of "burning." The crop, to end the strike. At the first meet
according to local growers, is being ing they unanimously rejected Pres
damaged considerably by the drouth ident" Harding's overtures on the
compelling early cutting. . ground that they could not restore
Some farmers state that although the seniority of the men. At their
the quality of the tobacco would be second they were divided on this
good, the yield will be light, and is same question.
considerably decreased. With the i o
exception of some tobacco where the Members of the "Big Five" broth
tops are still green,, the premature erhood group of rail strike media
cutting is not bad, as the crop is tors met yesterday at an uptown
housing up nicely. hotel, New York, and then left hur-
Reports say that in scattering in- riedly for a secret conference at an
stances the tobacco is really ready ' undisclosed place with representa
to cut, but that in most cases the'tives of the small group of rail ex
growers are cutting simply to pre ecutives who Wednesday were ready
vent greater damage by the heat, to take up as individual roads iur
Crops already in the barn are cur- ther negotiations,
ing in good shape, the weather being The failure of a majority of the
perfect for this stage of handling road to participate in negotiations
the crop. which the so-called minority contin-
Coin crops are reported as suf- ued late Wednesday night was as
fering from the drouth. Early corn cribed to two reasons:
gives promise of a good yield, but 1 Their refusal to recognize the
the late plantings are reported as seniority demands of the strikers as
being anything but promising in ap- a basis of settlement,
pearance and prospects. 2 Their refusal to consider tak-
o ing back all of the strikers, a point
There's no excuse for getting which President Hai ding's last pro-
half sick and run down when Tan- 'posal contained and which the strik
ing will make vou well, sturdy and ers have consistently demanded.
strong. Tanlac is sold by all good , The minor group was understood
druggists. (adv), 'to be willing to take back all of
' 'their old men providing it could be
' done without necessitating a with
S drawal from the stand on seniority
in which they concurred with the
majority.
EUSSELL EESIGNS AS -BLUE
GRASS LEAGUE TTF.AT)
Thomas M. Russell, of Maysville,
president of the Blue Grass League,
who was also president of the Blue
Grass League of a decade ago, ten
dered his. resignation at a meeting
of the club owners at the Phoenix
Hotel in ' Lexington, Wednesday
night. Mr. Russell will continue in
office until his successor is elected.
Club owners present expressed
much regret that Mr. Russell should
give up the presidency, but he ex
plained that the pleasure of holding
the oflice was not enough to com
pensate him for the "enemies" he
had made while trying to do his
duty. It was largely through the
efforts of Mr. Russell that the Blue
Grass circuit, composed of but six
clubs and carrying ,a schedule, of
but two games a week, was able to
weather the storms that threatened
to upset it during the early part of
the season. No mention has been
made as to who may be his suc
cessor. The meeting was hastily arrang
ed, and was not announced by Mr.
Russell until Wednesday. A num
ber of other matters were discussed,
including financial arrangements,
umpires, "meddling with players,"
and contracts. No definite action
was taken, except that it was de
cided that all contracts be forward
ed directly to the president.
The Winchester and Lexington
clubs agreed good-naturedly to fight
it out to the bitter end for the pos
session of John "Rasty" Wright,
who has pitched for both Qlubs,
and who has also been sold to Pitts
burg. Apparently an extensive legal
battle is to result.
President Russell announced that
Devereaux, Winchester first base
man, and Class, Maysville outfield
er, had been fined $25 and $10 re
spectively for a fist fight in which
the two engaged in a recent game.
Every club in the league with the
exception of Mt. Sterling was rep
resented. o
GET BEADY FOE SCHOOL SPECIAL
BUELEY SPEAKERS TO ADDRESS
GEOWEES T0-M0EE0W
Boys' Tom Sawyer blouses and
shirts, guaranteed not to fade, $1.
J. W. DAVIS & CO.
TXIAL OP EEESE EOX.SSTjgfU:
lU'iai. i
x.
4r
The date for the examining trial
of Reese Fox, charged with compile
ity in the murder of Leon Renaktr,
at Winchester, was set for today;
at 10 o'clock.
James G. Denny, of Lexington,
has been employed as counsel by
the defense, it was announced. Th
other attorneys for the defense ar
G. T. Wycoff and James F. Winn.
The defense will try to prove an!
alibi for the accused by Fox's
grandfather, John Rees, with whom
the boy makes his home, it waasMdA
The grandfather is expected, it is
said, to testify that Fox was at home
at 12 o'clock in the night of the
murder. l
o
ITEE DESTEOYS COTTAGE
Geoflrey Morgan, secretary of the
Kentucky Farm Bureaji Federation,
and Judge Denis Dundon, of Paris,
will speak' at points in West Vir
ginia Saturday in the interest of the
Burley Tobacco Growers' Co-operative
Association. J. Sherman Porter,
editor of the Burley Tobacco Grower
and publicity director of the associa
tion, will speak to-day at Vevay and
Saturday at North Vernon, Ind., at
meetings of tobacco growers to be
held in those towns.
Clifton Rodes, who has been in
charge of the West Virginia cam
paign, which included also the coun
ties of Southeastern Ohio, passed
through Lexington Tuesday on his
way to Western Kentucky, where he
will aid in the campaign to sign up
the dark district. Judge Robert W.
Bingham, who has been financing
the dark district campaign, as he did
that of the Burley district, sent Mr.
Rodes to West Virginia to organize
that State and, at the request of
Judge Bingham, the oflicials of the
Burley Association agreed to release
Mr. Rodes for the present to the
dark tobacco growers' association.
H. B. Carpenter, of Anderson
county, who has been with Mr.
Rodes ever since Judge Bingham
sent him to reopen the West Vir
ginia campaign, is his successor as
manaeer m that territorv. He has
been one of the most successful ! BLOWING 01XWEII .SHOT IN MT.
field men in the service of the asso- olriKlilNlx
clatl0n' The Big Four Oil Company, which;
Burley officials have been very recently struck oil on the Hon Pack
well pleased with what has beenjing Company lot in Mt. Sterlingy
accomplished in that territory, is shot the well and the test showed
was stated at the offices, about 3,-; between 15 and 16 barrels of Penn
000 growers having been added to sylvania crude. The well was
the membership since Mr. Rodes re- brought in at a depth of less than
sumed the campaign to sign them 300 feet. Another well was started
up. Mr. Carpenter and those as Wednesday by the same company on
sisting him will press the work un-ltne farm of Mrs- w; R- Tor for
merly tne w. r. i?'itzpaincK prop
erty, where a small well was struck
'several years ago. Experts are san-
' guine of a producing field when they
make their deep well test, which, it
is understood, will be started soon.
on the J. R. Magowan property.
The one-story cottage of Frank
Parker, colored, at North Middle
town, caught fire Tuesday morning'
during the absence of the family
and was destroyed, together with all
its contents, including $50 in cur-,
rency. For a time the entire town?
was in danger. A truck load of la
borers from the Xalapa Farm ren
dered valuable assistance in saving
neighboring property, and prevent
ing spread of the flames.
Fire. Wnd imd Ug bbiif Ibmt
tnce.. ,
THOMAS. WOODFORD & BRYAN
BOURBON GUN CLUB
'THE PRIDE OF PARIS"
FOR HER
WHO WOULD GO AWAY
TO SCHOOL OR COLLEGE
We have selected a collection of Frocks
ksthat would serve many purposes and
yet be in reason.
A simple Dress for School Wear made of
Piquetine or Tricotine with a Flapper
Hat to match.
A Frock of Silk Canton Crepe or Crepe
'Back Satin developed in styles that
bespeak better wear.
And for the Sorority Dance or the
Dinner ofr for Evening Wear we offer
an exquisite array of Black Lace r
Evening Gowns of many colors.
i
'
.jj$-"Vpr J
We welcome inspection whether
buying or just looking.
v$m
DEPARTMENT STORE
PARIS, KENTUCKY
MAKE VALUABLE FIND AT
EUMMAGE SALE
Several months ago a rummage
sale was held in the Northcott
building, on Main street, vacated by
W. T. Talbott as a clothing store.
As usual, all sorts of contributions
were sent to the sale, being mainly
articles that could well be disposed
of as surplus and undesirable stock
around the homes of Paris people.
Among those who attended the
sale was Louis Wollstein, of the
Twin Bros.' store, next door. Mr.
Wollstein had just disposed of
a good dinner, and feeling at peace
with all the world, stood taking in
the sights and sounds at the sale.
Finally, the autioneer placed on sale
a pen-and-ink drawing, nicely
framed. Mr. Wollstein purchased
the outfit for seventy-five cents, be
ing desirous of getting the frame
and glass more than the picture it
enclosed. After the drawing had
been stowed away in an obscure
place about the store for several
weeks Sello Wollstein, son of the
purchaser, happened to be making a
close inspection and discovered the
'drawing, to be a genuine one from
the pen of Charles Dana Gibson,
whose drawings have a high value
in the art world of to-day. There
was the genuine flowing signature of
Gibson in the corner. Art critics
who have examined the drawing
pronounce it a genuine Gibson and a
valuable find. The drawing illus
trates "The Education of Mr. PipP,"
the subject taken fiom one of Dick
ens' novels.
NOTICE TO TAXPAYERS.
THE" TIME LIMIT IS GROWING
' SHORT. CALL AT THE TAX COM
MISSIONER'S OPFICE IN THE
COURT HOUSE, AND LIST YOUR
TAXES
BEN WOODFORD,
TAX COMMISSIONER.
EXAMINATION POR VETERINARY
APPLICANTS
We held our regular shoot Wed
nesday afternoon with twenty-two
shooters taking part in the after
noon's sport. The crowd was small
on account of so many housing to
bacco, and threatening weather,
which finally did develope in hav
ing several nice showers. Now if our
opening the gun club will have any
think to do with getting some badly
needed rains, we will go over there
and stay open day and night. The
trophy, a nice traveling toilet set,
donated by A. J. Winters & Co., was
won by Douglas Thomas, Jr., after
a battle royal, four tying for first
shoo't-off, then two for second shoot
off and the third shoot-off decided
the winner. Don't forget the big
all-day registered shoot, which is
known as the Blue tirass Champion
ship, and will be held at Hill Top,
on the farm gf Alfred Clay. Scores:
Shot At Broke
Doug. Thonias 100
Wm. Ardery 100
H. M. Pvoseberry . . . .100
A. Buckner. . . . . . . . 75
Amos Turney 75
'Alfred Clay 75
J. L. Dodge 75
B. D. Goff 75
N. F. Brent r 75
"Roxie Davis 75
C. Buckner 75
Fred Burgin 50
T. W. Lang 50
J. C. Kenney 50
Sam Clay 50
R. Jones 50
Sam Harding 50
.Walter Kenney 50
Dr. R. R. McMillan. . . 25
Harry Kerslake . . . . 25
Mrs. Harry Kerslake . . 25
Mrs. M. J. Bursrin . . 25
95
92
87
71
71
69
69
69
66
61
60
49
46
44
44
41
35
32
18'
is!
14!
14
til every grower has had an oppor
tunity to sign.
NEW HOUSE POR SALE
NEW 7-R00M HOUSE COM
PLETE, HAS BATH, GAS. ELEC
TRIC LIGHTS. LOCATED ON
NORTH CLIFTON AVENUE.
BOURBON LUMBER CO.
(nov25-tn
WELL DRILLER
W. K. Kearney, welf driller, Ver-r
sailles, Ky. Phone 80. (tf)
ROXIE DAVIS, Secretary.
. o
"THE SHEIK OF ARABY" TO
DAY'S FILM FEATURE
The annual meeting of the State
Board of Veterinary Examiners
'will be held in Frankfort Monday,
August 28, for the purpose of hold
ing, an examination for- applicants
'for veterinary licenses.' - ..
The Sheik a steed a girl
some speed! a tent a kiss a
hug 0 bliss a flash a dash a
clash then smash!
"The Sheik of Araby," a thrilling
romance of the desert with H. B.
Warner as the Sheik. Beautiful
Nautch-girls, .lithe and sinuous in
Oriental attire real Arabians in
death-defying feats of horsemanship
desert battle between British
troops and Bedouin bandits and a
story fast and furious with action
and loaded with thrills.
Get the song! hear the record!
see the magnificent photoplay at
the Alamo and the Paris Grand to
morrow afternoon and night.
LUGGAGE: For the College Girl
' lift' C
-K"
srife.
rnr 'W
villi llliW hBt Ihb
Your College Trousseau
should be properly cared for, so that you will
always "look your best" on or off the campus.
We are now showing a trunk specially designed
"to care for" the college trousseau. It contains
many little conveniences and exclusive features
that will delight the college girl. And the price
fis unusually low for such a fine trunk.
We extend an invitation to come
in and view our showing ' of
"TRUNX FOR COLLEGE USE"
Throw off that tired, rundown
feeling and build up your strength
by eating nourishing food, Tanlac
does it.' Tanlac it sold, .by all good
IdTttMrist. (adv)
FRANK&CO.
LADIES' OUTFITTERS
.3 ,
a
o' 7
.1 9Z&S
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H
t
"Oilier ?

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