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The Bourbon news. (Paris, Ky.) 1895-19??, August 29, 1922, Image 1

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THE
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PUBLISHED EVERY
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VOLUME XLII
PARIS, BOURBON COUNTY, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, AUGUST 29, 1922
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7
BOURBON NEWS'to
TUESDAY ANTI FRJTIAV nv nro vpid vtft-
1
BIG THINGS PBOMISED FOE COM
MUNITY PICNIC
According to present arrange
ments practically every wholesome
amusement imaginable, will be pro
vided for both old and young, at the
Community Picnic, to be given on
Monday, September 4, in the Forrest
Letton woodland, near Paris.
The Maysville Cardinals Band, a
famous musical organization, will
delight with programs of popular
and classical music, and a speaker of
prominence will deliver an address
appropriate to the occasion. The
beautiful woodland will be an
inviting place to spend the day, and
every citizen of the county who can
attend should take a day off and
-visit the picnic. The little folks
will be taken care of, especial fea
tures being provided for their
amusement. A mammoth auction
sale of all kinds of good things will
be one of the day's features. Dona
tions are requested for this sale, and
may be taken to the home of Mrs.
Wm. G. McClintock, on Pleasant
street.
The picnic grounds are situated
on the Paris and Lexington road,
near Paris, easily accessible from
the interurban line, and by autos.
STAfiT SAVING NOW
The first dollar is the foundation
for real thrift. Leave your money
with the old reliable Bourbon Biuld
irig and Loan Association, where it
will not only earn a fair rate of in
terest, but it will be absolutely safe.
.New series opens Saturday, Septem
ber 2.
H. A.-POWER, President.
WILL S. ARNSPARGER, Sect'y.
REAL ESTATE DEALS
Auctioneer M. F. Kenney sold pub
licly at the court house door Satur
day for Master Commissioner O. T.
Hinton, a house and lot on Winches
ter street, belonging to Mrs. Eliza
beth Brown, to Dan Mahaney, . Sr.,
for $5,195. He also sold another
house .belonging to the same parties
to the Brown heirs, for $2,220.
NOTICE TO TAXPAYERS.
THE TIME LIMIT IS GROWING
'SHORT. CALL AT THE TAX COM
MISSIONER'S OFFICE IN THE
COURT HOUSE, AND UST YOUR
TAXES.
BEN WOODFORD,
TAX COMMISSIONER.
ZKKBhtl
"THE PRIDE
THREE BIG DOLLAR DAYS
DOLLAR DAY
FRIDAY
September 1st
4 -
DOLLARjDAY
MONDAY
For Prices See
V r
f C
O J
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DEPARTMENT STORE
PARIS, KENTUCKY
. r. .f
COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION
ERS CHOSEN
Will G. McClintock, Democrat,
and J. S. Taylor, Republican, were . dulged in recently regarding prob
named County Election Commis-able candidates for the Democratic
sioners for Bourbon county in the nomination for Governor. In this
list of Commissioners selected at ' connection, the name of James H.
Frankfort, Friday, by the State Elec- , Thompson, of Bourbon county, has
tion Board. The commissioners es- been given prominent and favorable
lected at this meeting will name the .
county officers to conduct the No
vember regular election and, the pri
mary election in 1923."
In several counties, especially in
the Tenth and Eleventh Congres
sional districts, the two Republi
can members of the commisssion,
Roy Speck, chairman, and J. M. Per
kins, out voted the Democratic
member, Dr. John Stout, of Danville,
and named the Democratic election
commissioners.
Mrs. Annie Shanks Bourne, who
was Democratic commissioner for
Henry county last year, was re-appointed.
She is the only woman
election commissioner in the State
and the only woman ever appointed
to this post in Kentucky.
EIRE DAMAGES TENTH STREET
SHOP
' Damage approvimating $750 was
sustained in a fire at midnight Sat
urday, which partly destroyed a
frame building on Tenth street. The
bouse was occupied by Phil Hop
kins, as a barber shop, and is owned
by Judge H. Clay Howard.
The department was called by an
alarm from Box 26, but by the time
they reached the scene the house
was practically destroyed. The cause
of the fire was undetermined. The
neighboring property, endangered
for a while, was saved without dam-
age. The loss on the building is j
fully covered by insurance.
o
Eire, Wind and Lightning Insur
ance. THOMAS. WOODFORD & BRYAN
THE RIGHT HAT
On the right man of course if it
comes from Davis' it is . right in
'every other way.
J. W. DAVIS & CO.
-ar-
NEW SEED CROPS
NEW CROP MICHIGAN ROSEY
RYE, TIMOTHY SEED.
BRENT & CO., INC.
29-tf)
OF PARIS'
DOLLAR DAY
SATURDAY
Friday's Paper
.7 -
,
M
. s.K
PROBABLE STARTERS IN GUBER
NATORIAL RACE
Much speculation has been in-
mention. Under the head of "The
JAMES H. THOMPSON
Democratic Nomination For Gover
nor' the Mt. Sterling Sentinel
Democrat pays the following com
pliment to Mr. Thompson, and to
Mr. Will E. Simms, of Woodford
county, a former resident of Paris:
"Much has been said in the pa
pers of the State regarding the next
Democratic nominee for Governor
and many splendid men suggested
for this important place. The Sentinel-Democrat
is not pledged or ob
ligated to any man and it shall be
our endeavor to present to our read
ers from time to time what informa
tion we can glean regarding those
who aspire to this high office or who
have been suggested as candidates.
We want to see in the Governor's
chair, a business man of education,
a man interested in good roads and
good schools and lastly a man who
has no further political aspriations,
but who will be satisfied to retire
after his term as Governor has ex
pired. "Among those suggested have
been Congressman A. W. Barkley,
Congressman W. J. Fields, Congress
man J. Campbell Cantrill, Hon.
Charles Marvin, Hon. William E.
Simms. Hon. James H. Thompson,
Hon. J. N. Camden, Editor Desha
j Breckinridge, Editor Harry A. Som-
mers, Judge Charles N. Harding,
I Hon. Thomas A. Combs, Judge W.
R. Shackleford and Judge Charles
C. Thomas,
j "Among those mentioned in the
State press as probable starters for
'the Democratic nomination for Gov
ernor has often been suggested the
name of Hon. Will E. Simms, of
.Woodford county.
' "Mr. Simms, a graduate of Yale, a
:man of means, a successful farmer
and a gentleman of most ,pleasing
'personality, would no doubt make
'a splendid race. For many months
;he has been giving his time toward
perfecting the Tobacco Growers' Co-
operative Association and has made
numerous speeches throughout the
State and it is from the people and
inot the politicians that men such as
Will Simms will receive support.
"One of the outstanding figures of
the last session of the General As
sembly was Hon James H. Thomp-
json, of Bourbon county, Speaker of
'the House of Representatives. As
.Speaker his rulings were always fair
and clean, his conduct above- re
proach, his courtesy unfailing and
one would often hear the expression
,'we need a man like Jim Thompson
'in the Governor's chair.'
"We have heard a number of men
mentioned for the Democratic nom-
ination for Governor and knov of no
one that would fill the office more
acceptably than he. Born on a farm
in Montgomery county, he moved to
Bourbon county when quite a young
man, where he has since resided.
While he has represented his county
twice as a member of the Legisla
ture, he could in no sense be termed
a -politican because on both occa
sions he has been practically drafted
'for service by his party and was
nominated and elected without oppo
sition. "As a business man and farmer he
has been a success and his interest
in the welfare of the farmer was
proven by his labors in behalf of a
fair and just tax law for the own
'ers of real property and we doubt
if there is a better posted man in the
State on matters of taxation than
Mr. Thompson.
"A man of the people, interested in
rendering some real service to the
State, with no selfish interests to
' serve and no further political am
bitions to gratify he would make a
candidate any right-thinking, Kentucky-loving
citizen could fearlessly
and conicientiously support. We do
not know whether Mr. Thompson is
mW'Mmm
PEESBYTEBIANS OPEN CAM
PAIGN IN BOUEBON COUNTY
The Presbyterians of Paris have
opened their campaign for Christian
Education. This is a part of the
Statewide movement for $1,000,000
for' Centre College; the Presbyterian
Theological Seminary; Kentucky
College for Women; Witherspoon
College; Pikeville College; Lees
Collegiate Institute; Matthew T.
Scott, Jr., Academy; Sayre School,
and the Presbyterian Orphanage at
Anchorage.
About forty Presbyterian officers
and their wives, and several guests
atttended the Blue Hue dinner
Monday evening at the First Presby
terian church at six-thirty o'clock,
when Dr. John jC. Acheson, Presi
dent of the Kentucky College for
women, and Dr. John M. Vander
Meulen, President of the Theologi
cal Seminary, spoke on Christian
education. Both are widely known
throughout Kentucky as authorities
'on Christian education. A number
of other prominent . Pjresbyterians
were called during the evening. At
'the Blue Hue dinner the plans of
the campaign in Paris, and just
what the cause means to the Pres
byterian churches here and through
out the State, were explained by
Paul Harris, Jr., of Louisville.
This Blue Hue dinner is a special
feature of the campaign and marks
the actual beginning of the inten
sive work necessary in a cause of
this kind, according to Mr. E. R.
Pike, who is in charge of the work.
The active co-operation of the wo
men of the Presbyterian church has
been secured, and they did much,
tprough Mrs. J. T. Tadlock, chair
man to make the dinner a success.
The musical program was under the
direction of Miss Elizabeth Crutcher.
The active committees have been
appointed by those in charge of the
Presbyterian movement for Christi
an education a woman's commit
tee and a committee in charge of
the four-minute speakers. Serving
under Mrs. J. T. Tadlock, chairman
of the Woman's Committee, are a
number of sub-chairmen, as follows:
Prayer, Mrs. Charles Butler and
Mrs. R. J. Neely; Census, Mrs. J. T.
Vansant; Special Program, Mrs. T.
S. Smylie; Life Enlistment, Mrs. J.
Simms Wilson; Organization, Mrs.
'Owen L. Davis.
The four-minute men will present
the case at all church services. This
committee is headed by Owen L. Da-
Vis, and serving with him are Judge
E. M. Dickson, Claude M. Thomas,
C. B. Mitchell, M. P. Collier and
Robert Meteer.
HUNDEEDS BUY THEIE HOMES
THROUGH PEOPLES BUILDING
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
The Peoples Building and Loan
Association Inc., has helped over
300 people of Paris and Bourbon
county pay for their homes during
its existence. It affords an easy
"system to save, by means of which
hundreds of people have been help
ed to get a start in the business
world.
It is a good organization to boost.
Boost it by becoming a member.
Boost it with your influence.
G. W. WILDER, President.
F. W. GALLOWAY, Secy.
' o
NICE HOME AT AUCTION SALE
FRIDAY
Substantial, well-built five-room
cottage, with bath and pantry, at
public sale on Friday, Sept. 1, at
2:30 p. m. on the premises, No. 16,
Sixteenth street. A bargain for a
home-seeker. Home is well located,
just off Main street, and is a most
desirable piece of property,
o
"HEAD OVEE HEELS" WITH MA
BEL NOEMAND
No actress on the screen to-day
has enjoyed the vicissitudes of her
success more than the ebullient Ma-!
bel Normand, who will be seen in
her newest Goldwyn photoplay,
"Head Over Heels," at the Alamo
and Grand this afternoon and night.
In her latest Goldwin release,
"Head Over Heels," she is cast as a
foreign acrobat with a flaring tem
perament. And never one in the
course of her encounters witli the
representatives of a strange civiliza
tion, does she balk at being the cir
cus performer to the life. However,
there are gentle moments also for
Miss Normand in this photoplay, for
the ignorant acrobat blossoms into a
sweet girlish personality whose love
ly eyes and captivating manner have
much to do with solving the problem
of her career.
As usual, Mabel Mormand is sup
ported by an excellent cast, includ
ing Hugh Thompson, Russ Powell,
Raymond Hatton and Lilyan Tash
man. even considering running or not, but j
if he should-make the race he has a
host of friends here in. old- Mont-,
gomery who would so their- limit
THE STRTKF, SITUATION
Attempts to end the rail shopmen's
strike by separate settlements with
individual roads failed and confer
ences were broken off in New York.
In announcing the breaking off of
negotiations, David Williams, head
of the Eastern strike committee,
said:
"Nothing else could have happen
ed. If they'll quit fussing around
we'll beat these fellows."
A statement by the executives rep
resenting fifty-two main and subsid
iary lines with 85,000 miles of
trackage, who had attended the lat
est conferences, disclaimed any de
sire to take advantage of the strike
situation to curtail the "pension or
privileges" which had been earned
by the strikers before quitting and
expressed a willingness to restore all
strikers with pension privileges un
impaired.
From unofficial sources it was
learned that the breakup came when
labor men rejected a proposal ad
vanced by the roads which was re
garded by executives as representing
a big concession.
At labor headquarters, . where it
was said the unions were prepared
for a fight-to-the-finish, telegrams
were being dispatched all over the
country, .calling upon strikers to re
new the struggle with redoubled
vigor.
"We know where we stand now,"
ICE CEEAM
Smith's cream packed and deliver
ed at:
60c per quart.
$1.00 per half-gallon.
$2.00 per gallon.
Any one having packers,
will
please call 494.
SMITH'S CONFECTIONERY,
(july28-tf) 429 Main St.
PICTUEE PROGRAM AT ALAMO
AND GEAND
To-day, Tuesday, August 28 Ma
bel Normand, in "Head Over
'Heels;" Mutt and Jeff comedy, "Get
ting Ahead;" Comedy, "Snookie's
Home Run."
'Pri-Tn rwvrwvr WTar noelov Aumief
3nuvo0 n nniAin,
Tom Moore, in "Mr. Barnes, of
- .. ' .
New York;" Pathe News; Christie ,
comedy, "Let Me Explain."
Thursday, August 31 Pauline
Frederick, in Roads of Destiny;"
Snub Pollard comedy, "Some Baby;".
Movie Chats.
1
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LU GG AGE: For the College Girl
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Your College Trousseau
should be properly cared for, fo that you will
always "look your best" on or off the campus.
We are now showing a trunk specially designed
"to care for" the college trousseau. It contains
many little conveniences and exclusive features
that will delight the college girl. And the price
is unusually low for such a fine trunk.
We extend an invitation to come
in and view our showing of
"TRUNX FOR COLLEGE USE"
KRANK&CO.
LADIES' OUTFITTERS :
D. A. E. TBIP TO PEAHEFOK
THUESDAY
Have you ever visioned the beau
ties of the Kentucky River from th
deck of a slow-moving steamer, or
from a comfortable seat on a barge,
as they floated tranquilly along?,
Have you ever made one of the
trips? If you have not, then th
chance will be afforded you on
Thursday, when the Jemima John- "
son Chapter, D. A- R., will proMo JfC
a round-trip to Frankfort and a rid
up the river.
The big barge, towed by a river
steamer, will leave Frankfort at ten
o'clock on the morning of Thurs
day, August 31, for the trip. Thos
who have viewed the ever-changing
beauties of the river and its envi
ronments need not be told of it
wonders, but to those who havjt
never been there it will be a revela
tion of beauty. The journey to
Frankfort may be made by the L. &
N., the Interurban, or by motor car
arriving in time to join the party.
The round trip will cost only on
dollar. Those intending to make the
trip should provide themselves with
a box lunch, which can be served on
the upper deck of the barge.
The proceeds will be used by the
local D. A. R. Chapter in purchasing
a marker to mark the grave of
Squire Boone, brother of Kentucky'
noted pioneer, Daniel Boone, which
has been located on a farm on the
Little Rock pike, near Paris. The
Chapter also aims to purchase a
bronze tablet, bearing names of all
the Revolutionary soldiers from
Bourbon county, to be plaved in a
conspicuous place in the Bourbon
county court house, as soon as per
mission can be obtained.
All members of J;he D. A. R., their
friends, and their friends, or any
others can spend a most enjoyable
day by making this trip, which will
be one of great interest to them.
Pack up your old lunch box, lay
aside all your business and social
cares, and go to Frankfort on the
D. A. R. trip Thursday.
o
BUY NON-TAXABLE STOCK THAT
WILL EAEN MONEY.
Peoples Building and Loan As-
sociation, Inc., stock is non-taxable.
t Viae olwave Tvmn nn nvprafre nlvl
x --" -' -;-
dent of 7 Per cent, which is abso-
lute1 net; Make your money get
Jom any time ow 1S a1
Wd,y! ZT " TTT -t, t - '
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F. W. GALLOWAY, Secy.
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