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The Bourbon news. (Paris, Ky.) 1895-19??, September 29, 1922, Image 1

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PUBLLSHED EVERY TUESDAY AND FRIDAY Oi THE YEAR.
VOLUME XLII
PARK, B0UHBON COUNTY, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, W22
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NEWS
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BASEBALL
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Paris 3, Cynthiana 7.
Winchester 2, Lexington 1.
Mt. Sterling-Mays ville (Rain,
game.)
no
The Cinicinnati Reds and Louis
ville Colonels of the American Asso
ciation have been hooked for exhibi
tion games at the local park next
-month. The Reds are scheduled to
appear here on October 11, while
the Colonels will make their appear
ance on October 14. Admirers of
the Reds are not "wanting here in
Paris, and the appearance of the
Cincinnati - aggregation will no
doubt draw a large crowd to League
Park.
The church League team took the
Mammoths by-surprise in a game
played at League Park, Wednesday
afternoon, winning out by the score
of 5 to 4. An outstanding feature
of the game was a sensational one
handed catch of a long high fly by
Mastin, of the Church League team.
.Y. M. C A. NOTES
The Y. M. C. A. Boys Band is the
-first of the Y. M. C. A. activities to
-open up for the fall and winter sea--son,
the band having held its first
regular practice Wednesday even
ing. The Business Men's Gymnasium
and Volley Ball class will begin
Wednesday, Octbber 4, at 5 o'clock.
"The class will meet Mondays, Wed
nesdays and Fridays. An unusually
large number of business and pro
fessional men are expected in this
class.
The members of the Young Men's
gymnasium class will hold a meet
ing at an early date and arrange a
.schedule for their class-
The Younger Boys' gymnasium
class will .begin Monday, October 2.
The class will begin MondaybHN
The class will meet regularly on
Monday and Wednesday after
school, and Saturday morning at 10
o'clock. The outlook is bright for
-a, large enrollment in all of these
classes.
D0DS0N HOME AT AUCTION
Seven-room, two-story frame resi
dence, on Brent street, at public sale
September 27. Read the ad in to
day's NEWS.
HARRIS, SPEAKES & HARRIS.
(22-26)
?
'THE PRIDE
FASHIONS
IN
COATS AND SUITS
Marleen Duvel-Marvello Bolivia
Pandora Velverette Normandy
Panvelaine Poncianna Yalama
Tricotine Piquetine and Twill Cprds
Fur Trimmed and Plain
All
A-
. EXCLUSIVE AGENCY '
BETTY WALES DRESSES
AND , ;";;
SHIRLEY FROCKS
Canton Crepe Spirella French
Boucle Crepe Satin
and
Piquetin Tricotine tand Other.' Nov
elty Materials . '
ALL LEADING SHADES " '? 'r &
"
DEPARTMENT STORE
PARIS,
rv
OFFICERS UNEARTH COMPLETE
-MOONSHINE DISTILLERY
Elza Zimmerman, a tenant on
the farm of J. Hal Woodford, near
Paris, was placed under- arrest and
taken to the county ' jail, Tuesday
afternoon by Sheriff M. Peale Col
lier, Deputy Sheriff R. M. Gilkey and
Patrolman George W. Judy. Zim
merman was charged with having a
moonshine still in his possession
for the purpose of manufacturing
liquor illegally and with transport
ing liquor. After being put through
a course of "sprouts" by the officers,
Zimmerman confessed nis guilt.
The officers discovered at Zim
merman's home ja. .complete copper
still, of ten gallons capacity,, which
they pronounced the most complete
piece of apparatus they had yet
seen. The outfit was brought to
Paris and placed in the vault in the
Sheriff's office, Zimmerman was
not at home at the time of the offi
cers' visit, but a short time after he
was located driving toward Paris
with a horse and buggy. The buggy
when searched, yielded about a gal
lon of freshly made moonshine,
which Zimmerman informed the offi
cers was 120 proof.
In default of $1,000 "bail, Zim
merman was held. in the jail, until
ten o'clock Wednesday morning,
when he was given a hearing before
County Judge George Batterton.
He was fined $100 and given a jail
sentence of sixty days on the charge
of transporting moonshine liquor
and for having same in his posses
sion, and was held to the grand jury
in $500 bond to answer to the
charge of making liquor , illegally.
PRICE'S SAUSAGE
Price's pure fresh sausage now
received every day. Phone us your
order.
LOGAN HOWARD.
CASH CROWE ARRESTED
Officials from the Sheriff's office
arrested Cash Crowe on a warrant
charging him with pointing a revol
ver at Charles Whaley during the
ballooon ascension in this city.
Crowe was held in the sum of $300
bond, for appearance for trial in the
County Court, his bond being signed
by Dr. D. S. Henry.
To
Fire. Wind and Lightning Insur
ance. THOMAS. WOODFORD & BRYAN
OF PARIS'
FAVORITES
Shades
M
,
KENTUCKY
DISCIPLES
Sessions of Nineteenth
Paris Present Many Interesting
Features
VISIT CANE RIDGE TO-DAY
For the second time in the his
tory of Paris the city is host to the
annual convention of the Kentucky
Disciples of Christ, which is the
name by which the "Christian"
church is now officially known.
The other meeting was held here
nineteen years ago. This year the
meeting will go down in church his
tory as being one of the most nota
ble in recent years, due to a num
ber of outstanding features.
Although the opening program
did 'not start until 7:30 Monday
night, scores of the delegates had
reached Paris by noon of that day
and had been assigned to the homes
of Paris people. On account of the
lack of hotel accommodations most
of the delegates have been given
lodging at the homes of Paris citi
zens, members of the congregation
and friends of the local church, and
are to take lunch at the church,
where arrangements have been
made to take care of the five hun
dred or more delegates who are in
attendance. Dinner is being served
for the three days of the meeting at
the Christian church, by the ladies
of the Paris Presbyterian church,
with Miss Frances Butler, in
charge. They made preparations
for ministering to the wants of an
average of three hundred persons
daily.
Dr. W. Hume Logan, of Louis
ville, presided at the opening meet
ing Monday night, and Dr. Vernon
Stauffer, of the College of the Bible,
at Lexington, tookcharge of the de
voational exercises, the scripture
reading being taken from the fifty
fourth chapter of Isaiah. Follow
ing the devotional exercises, Dr.
Logan introduced Harold Harris,
secretary of the Paris Commercial
Club, who welcomed the guests to
the city on. behalf of the city of
! Paris, in a -speech replete with gems
of oratory and showed Mr. Harris
to have' developed an hithertSftm-"
suspected talent for public speak
ing. Mr. Harris stated that the
proximity of Paris to old Cane
Ridge church, "the cradle of the
Christian church," established by
Barton W. Stone, accentuated a
welcome on the part of Paris kin
dred to that of maternal love.
Mr. Harris was followed by Dr.
Logan, who accepted formally the ! Secretary, Mrs. J. A. Stucky; Treas
welcome extended tne delegates, and ! urer, Mrs. O. L. Bradley.; General
then introduced Mrs. Ella Johnson Secretary, Mrs. Louise Campbell;
Montjoy, superintendent of the Fe
male Orphan ScTibol, at Midway.
Mrs. Montjoy gave an interesting
report of the finances of that school.
The report showed that $3,952.61 of
last year's funds had come from do
nations from the churches of Ken
tucky, and $6,546.00 had come 'from
personal gifts. The total gifts from
all sources amounted to $13,341.03,
and the total receipts for the year
amounted to $44,244.78: The
amount of disbursements was $42,
311.76, leaving about $2,000 in the
treasury at the close of the year.
The last address was one on the
subject of education, delivered by
Dr. A. D. Harmon, new president of
Transylvania College. Dr. Harmon
said a Christian education is more
essential to-day than at any other
time during the world's history.
Leaflets were distributed con
taining the report of offerings of
the Christian churches of Kentucky
for the Board of Education of
Transylvania College and the Col
lege of tbBible, July 1, 1921, to
June 30, 1922. This leaflet showed
that the offerings came from sixty
seven churches and amounted to
$11,547.02, and that this amount
does not include gfits from individ
uals. Last year these offerings
from churches were less than $6,
000. Special music was furnished -by
an augmented choir, under the di
rection of Mrs. Edna Dryden. The
closing prayer was offered by, Rev.
Mark Collis, pastor of the Broadway
Christian. church, in Lexington.
Tuesday's session was given up
to proceedings of the Women's
Christian Missionary Society, whose
program was carried through the
day. In the absence of the presi
dent, Mrs. Charles Allen Thompson,
Mrs. John T. Gay, president of the
organization from 1909 to 1921,
presided. The devotional exercises
were conducted by Hayes Farish, of
Lexington. The morning exercises
were carried out in the presence of
a largely increased attendance. Af
ter singing of the. opening hymns,
"Crown Him Lord of All." and' "I
Need Thee Every Hour," the busi
ness session was held.
-Mrs. O. L. Bradley, treasurer,
presented t her report,, which apply
ing exclusively to the State -deyi-upment-Xund,-showed
.receipts mt
OF CHRIST
j The Bourbon County Board of
Annual Convention In'SSSS jTSTSS .SU
$4,943.00; disbursement, $4,030.95;
balance on hand July 1,
1922. j
w.uo. Additional pledges were;ically unable to g0 to the polls,
taken for the Sue Sublett Memorial, JTne polls will be open from six in
the pledges thus far reported the morning to nine at night. The
amounted to $5,308.30, from seven-;fnllnwinfr ,a ih(X 11qt nf nffirfirs.
ty-eight churches, secured since
September 1, without speech-mak-ing.
The interest manifested by the I
young people and their achieve
ments were told by the
secretary,
Mrs. J. T. Sullivan,- The banner .
was awarded to the Russell Cave
Band. Mrs. W. C. Stanley, secre-
tary or Circles and Triangles Clubs,
gave a report full of
a report run 01 encourage-
ment, showing 3,362 young people
receiving missionary instruction in
the organization; that 116 Circles
gave $7,8 2 4, .40, and Triangle
Clubs, $482.50, a total "of $8,306.90,
which .was expended for $400
scholarships in the College of Mis
sions, and for girls sent to Hazel
Green; money sent ta Paraguay;
Winchester girls gave $1,000 for
Frances Waller Gambo, who goes
to India; thirty-three Triangles
are supporting twenty-seven or
phans in Mexico.
Mrs. W. R. Humphrey submitted
a report on the year's work, show
ing an enrollment of 6,372 women,
who last year contributed $30,677.
77; young people have given $10,
316.90 to support missionaries, hos
pitals and homes; the largest offer
ing of the year was made by the So
ciety of the Broadway Christian
church, of Lexington, $1,755, they
also lead in membership, with 225;
the Paris Society gave $961.00;
Louisville, Lexington and Winches
ter over $1,000 each; the women of
Kentucky will build a home in
Porto Rico for Mr. and Mrs. Vera
Carpenter, missionaries.
Mrs. Louise Loos Campbell gave a
charming talk on "The Outlook."
V. C. Carpenter brought a message
concerning the people of .Porto Rico
and the missionary work among
these people being done by the
Americans.
At the afternoon session the fol
lowing officers were elected for next
year: President, Mrs. Charles Allen
Thomas; First Vice-President, Mrs.
John Gay; Second Vice-President,
Mrs. Ida W. Harrison; Recording
Associate Secretary, Mrs. W. R.
Humphrey; Secretary of Circles,
Mrs. Stanley;- Literature for Boys
and Girls, Mrs. Sullivan.
' Mrs. James Ogderi, a native of
Carlisle, gave an interesting re
sume of tne work done in Thibet by
Mr. Ogden and herself in 1905, they
now being in America on their sec
ond furlough. Mrs. V. C. Carpen
ter gave an address on her share in
the work in Porto Rico. Mrs. Gay
read a message received from Miss
Sue Sublett, expressing her appre
ciation of the honor conferred on
her in naming the Porto Rico home
for her. The closing address of the
session was made by Jesse Bader,
U. C. M. S. Superintendent of Evan
gelism, who gave a general survey
of "the work done among missionary
lines in thisvand the foreign fields.
He pleaded earnestly for an in
creased circulation and reading of
religious journals and books, and
gave a comprehensive statement of
conditions.
Refreshed and strengthened by
their night's rest, the 614"delegates
to the convention resumed work at
Wednesday's session, which was ful
ly as interesting as the exercises of
the day before. The morning pro
gram opened with a devotional ex
ercise conducted by E. J. Wills.
The conference on county workers'
problems was led by Neal K.? Mc
Gowan, with M. A. Hart presiding,
and Rev. Bruce Trimble; of Mt.
Sterling, secretary.
H. W. Elliott, secretary and
treasurer of the State Board of Mis
sions, read the annual report, and
an address on "Tne uo-operative
Search For The Best," was delivered
by Rev. M. A. Hart. Discussions on
"The Types of State Mission Work,"
led by Vice-President H. H. Webb,
of Covington, were participated in
by W. J. Clarke and H. C. Bell. The
principal address of the' afternoon
session was delivered by Dr. R. H.
Miller, of Kansas Citjr, who did not
arrive in time to take part in the
morning program. The election of
officers for the State Missionary So
ciety resulted in the following selec
tions;. President, Rev. H. H. Webb,
Covington; vice-president, Rev. W.
E. Ellis, -Paris; second vice-presi-dent
C. () Ewingi Louisville;- re
cordimg secretary? Iter. Bruce Trim
ly... (Cotiud .on 'Page 'Four)--
ELECTION BOARD APPOINTS
ELECTION OFFICERS
! Clerk Pearce Paton, and made ap
pointment of election officers s who
will serve at all registrations and
elections for the next year. Their
first service will be in the ten Paris
precinct next Tuesday, October 3,
which will be registration day. All
persons desiring to vote in any elec
tion held within the next year will
be required to register at this tim&
uniess absent from the city or phys-
. 0 . -
Paris No. 1 W. G. Talbott,
judge; T. H. Butler, clerk; William
Goodloe, judge; W. V. Hutchcraft,
sheriff.
0
Paris No. 2 E. F. Prichard.
illd -. Tnhn Mat.t.nT Hprlr- TC. TT.
0wens judge. G Petree sheriff.
Paris No 3E M Fister judge.
J p Talbottf cierk; M. E. Mc-
Curdy judge; E. H. Gorey, sheriff.
Pftr,R Nn 4 T -r1a -.
" -w. m wf WMwf
F. S. Elder, clerk; John Richard,
judge; J. M. Russell, sheriff.
Paris No. 5 J. T. Tadlock, judge;
O. T. Hinton, clerk; Stamps Moore,
judge; R. P. Dow, sheriff.
Paris No. 6 O. Edwards, judge;
Hofd Mann, clerk; C. P. Mann,
judge; W. C. Bell, sheriff.
Paris No. 7 C. F. Redmon,
judge; Chas. Greene, clerk; H. C.
Whaley, judge; J. L. Horton,
sheriff.
Paris No. 8 Ira Parks, judge;
Bennett Thomas, clerk; W. J. Ken
ton, judge; W. S. Hughes, sheriff.
Paris No. 9 Ray Harris, judge;
H. L. Baldwin, clerk; Clyde Huff
man, judge; Stanley Breeze, sheriff.
Paris No.. 10 M. F. Kenney,
judge; Raymond Connell, clerk; J.
D. Shy, judge; Carlton Williams,
sheriff.
Millersburg No. 1 John Wright,
judge; Mackey Grimes, sheriff; F.
A. Herbert, judge; John S. Ken
nedy, clerk.
Millersburg No. 2 Alex Miller,
judge;. A. J. Thaxton, sheriff; John
B. Vimont, judge; James Howard,
clerk.
Millersburg No. 3 H. W. Purdy,
judge; John Withers, sheriff; J. S.
Shoptaugh, judge; James Cleaver,
clerk.
Millersburg No. 4 Carlton Ball,
judge; Strawther Banta, sheriff; E.
P. Wagoner, judge; J. D. Booth,
cler,k.
Flat Rock No. 1 Clifton Gillis
pie, judge; Ray Burris, sheriff;
Chester Gore, judge; Clay Guthrie,
clerk.
Flat Rock No. 2 Troop Clark,
judge; Clarence Ralls, sheriff W.
P. Thomas, judge; Ed. Thomason,
clerk.
Flat Rock No. 3 T. J. Redmon,
Judge; J. C. Kenney, sheriff; For
rest Day, judge; M. C. Wells, clerk.
North Middletown No. 1 Frank
Sledd, judge; Robert Jones, sheriff;
Davis Patrick, judge; J. M. Mur
phy, clerk.
North Middletown No. 2 Roy
McCray, judge; Bert Rash, sheriff;
J. G. Yocum, judge; Will Shumate,
clerk.
North Middletown No. 3 Ben
Woodford, judge; C. C. Hadden,
sheriff; W. A. Tuttle, judge; U. G.
Fleming, clerk.
Clintonville No. 1 Varden Shipp,
judge; Ij. C. Terrill, sheriff; J. M.
Carter, judge; Sam Weathers, clerk.
Clintonville No. 2 J. A. Liter,
judge; B. J. Clay, sheriff; V. B.
Morton, judge; Harlin Roe, clerk.
Clintonville No. 3 John Wood
ford, judge; J. F. Ingels, sheriff;
George Leeds, judge; Roy Pepper,
clerk.
Hutchison No. 1 Wm. Meteer,
judge; S. W. Spears, sheriff; Clay
brook Jacoby, judge; C. P. Rice,
clerk.
Hutchison No. 2 Matt Lair,
judge; Clarence Wright, sheriff;
Tom Mitchell, judge; Geo. C. Wat
kins, clerk.
Centerville No. 1 V. W. Fergu
son, judge; D. M. Frederickson,
sheriff; John B. Bell, judge; George
McLeod, clerk.
Centerville No. 2 3VI. Hume
Payne, judge; Herbert L. Smith,
sheriff; E. F. Poe, judge; R. L.
Shropshire, clerk.
Centerville No. 3 Calvin Jones,
judge; Arch Gum, sheriff; C. H.
Kuster, judges; Ewaltv Haley, clerk.
Ruddles Mills, No. 1 John Doty,
judge; Al Roberts, sheriff; Arthur
Barnes, judge; Luther Moreland,
clerk.
Ruddles Mills No. 2 Clifton Dal
zell, judge; A. E. Turney, sheriff;
Lindsay Huff, judge; Harve Wago
ner, clerk.
Ruddles Mills No. 3 J. B. Arkle.
judge; Wm. McCann, sheriff; Elmer
Shumate, judge; C. A. Tabor, clerk.
BOY PULL-OVER SWEATERS
All-wool, of course, inNall combi
nations of colors $4.50, $5 and
$6.50.
- v .. . J. . W- DAVIS & CO.-
PAHS HJGB JCVWLVGraiU
COURSE ' ' '
Paris will 'have a Lyceum CovMf
that will excell all preceding oat
in the presentation of the bMt
known artists in the Lyceum leli.
There will be ten numbers, eack o
which promises to be attractive ilT
an entirely original and refreshiiff
way. Every program is so versatile
and varied that it appeals to both,
the critical and popular taste.
This course is brought to Paris by
the City School for. the entertain
ment and instruction of' the f ujfrlf,
Lpatrons and friends of the school. It
win euaum uueui to wurit mure ind
igently, to think more clearly, to
play more joyfully, and consequent
ly to accomplish more during the"
year.
The unanimous support of the Ly
ceum Course now means the steady
mental growth of the whole com
munity. There will be a greater
demand for high-class entertain
ments in the city, and no other
kind will be accepted.
Miss Frances Butler, chairman of
the finance committee, has season,
tickets on sale at $2.50. Buy your
ticlfet now and avoid the rush.
CLOSED MONDAY
On account of Monday, October 2,
being a holiday, my store will be
closed all day,,
DAVID FELD.
B0UEB0N MAN SENTENCED
In the Federal Court at Frank
fort, Wednesday, Judge A. M. J.
Cochran imposed jail sentences on a
number of persons charged with vio
lation of the prohibition laws.
Among the number was Henry Fee
back, of Bourbon county, who waa
given three months in jail for hav
ing mponshine whisky in his poseet
sion.
BEAD THIS CAREFULLY!
If the lost breast pin belonging
to Mrs. John J. McClintock, of
Duncan avenue, is returned to her,
no question will be asked.
(26-29)
r
ECHO OP THE STBIZE
Handbills were strewn around the
streets of Paris, Tuesday, calling at
tention of business men of Paris and
the county farmers to the coal sit
nation, lack of cars, etc., and asking
them to get in touch with different
railroad managements in an effort
to effect an immediate settlement
of the strike.
NEW SEED CROPS
NEW CROPMcilGAN ROSEK
RYE TIMOTHY SEED.
BRENT & CO., INC.
(29-tf)
o
HOW TIMES HAVE CHANGED!
People who are decrying the pres
ent styles, rolled-down stockings,
short skirts, etc., will probably be
interested in the following fashion
note, clipped from a local column
published in THE BOURBON
NEWS of April 12, 1382:
"Several pretty, brown-striped
gingham dresses were noticed on
our streets Sunday. They were cut
short, .and draped In artistic 'folds
on ttie rear of the skirts, and the
tasty wearers wore plain broad brim
black hats plainly trimmed in
brown striped satin ribbon, almost
matching the dresses."
o
NOW IS THE EST TIME
Now is the best time to select
Christmas and greeting cards while
all the lines are complete. We hare
the finest line of samples to be had
and will be glad to show them to
you. Come in now.
THE BOURBON NEWS JOB DE
PARTMENT. o
BOURBON BRED COLT WINS
BREEDERS FUTURITY
Carrying the colors of J. S. Ward,
Louisville turfman, the chestunt
colt, NDonges, by Celt, won the
twelfth renewal of the Breeders Fu
turity, at the closing day of the Lex
ington meet, Wednesday. The race,
which had an added value, of $5,
000, was worth $15,018.50 to the
winner.
Donges was bred at the Claiborne
Farm of Arthur B. Hancock, near
Paris. Besides the $15,018.50'
which Mr. Ward, his owner, re
ceived as the winning share of the
purse, Mr. Hancock received '$500
for nominating the colt. u
o
BURNS PROPERTY AT AUCTIOM.
Harris, Speakes & Harris will sell
publicly, Saturday, September 3t, .
at two o'clock p. m., the Bums m
galow, on Vine street. A fine caaae
to get a home. Read the ad in THB.
NEWS. I
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