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The Bourbon news. (Paris, Ky.) 1895-19??, October 10, 1922, Image 1

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PUBLISHED EVERY TUESDAY XAND FRIDAY EN THE YEAR.
m i.
VOLUME XLII
PARIS, BOURBON COUNTY, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1922
' .r v -i .i. irtu i ;VMn.A
PRISONERS MAKE ESCAPE FROM
PARIS JAIL
Will Rankin and Frank Hanks,
colored prisoners, who were serving
sentences in the Paris jail on boot
legging charges, made their escape
from the bastile ty the now' familiar
trick of heating the limestone par
tition until it crumbled and then
removing the bars from the outside
-windows.
It was rumored Saturday that the
men had an automobile in waiting
in which they were taken to Ohio,
where Rankin, it was alleged, had
planned to take a position as camp
cook on a big construction job, just
before he was arrested a short time
ago. A white man, suspected of be
ing implicated in the escape of the
men, could not be located, and his
automobile was missing.
Rankin and Hanks had been lodg
ed in the older part of the jail.
There are now four steel cells
which that night contained two
prisoners. Jailer Taylor stated that
lie was under the impression that a
State law would have prohibited
him from incarcerating the two col
ored men in the same portion of the
jail which Js used for white pris
oners. FOOTBALL NOTES
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
University of Kentucky, 15;
Uni-
versity of Cincinnati, O.
Transylvania College, 0; Marshall
College, 58.
Center College, 55; University of
Mississippi, 0.
The Freshman football team of
the University of Kentucky, took
the Paris High School team into
camp on Hancock Field Friday af
ternoon, by the score of 27 to 0.
The Paris team put up a strong
fight, but the University team had
come prepared to do or die, and
rather than die, they did in a truly
gridiron field style. The members
of the Paris team are not one whit
cast down by their defeat, but are
ready to tackle the next bunch of
warriors for the honor of old P. H.
S. A meeting was held in the audi-,
torium of the High School previous
to the game, in which words of en
couragement were handed out to the
Paris players as a sort of mental
stimulant to them. But Paris will
come through again with ihe turn
of the tide.
No matter what others say, the
clothier will strive his best to suit
you.
BE SURE
TO SEE
"Smart
i
or
Particular
"f
IN THE
f&L
DEPARTMENT STORE
PARIS, KENTUCKY
AT
COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
AGRICULTURAL PAIR
'
cTWILLERSBURG
FRIDAY OCTOBER 13th
An Exhibition of New Fall'
Goats Suits and Dresses
Well Worth- Seeing
COMMERCIAL CLUB TO RESUME
MONTHLY DJNNERS
The first of the monthly dinners
of the Paris Commercial Club, after
the summer vacation, will be held
in the Y. M. C. A., Thursday even
ing, at 6:30 p. m.
Much of the entertainment which
was a feature of last year's dinners
will be curtailed in the interest of
a round-table discussion of ideas
and plans immediately urgent. This
first dinner, in other words,4will be
almost entirely "eats and business."
. Everyone who is sincerely Inter
ested in the Commercial Club doing
something worth "while in the way
of stimulating fall business, .is urg
ed to be present and contribute to
the general discusssion.
W. S. Dale has been secured as
caterer for the dinner, and Billy
assures us that eats will be plenti
ful.
Representatives of all .. organiza
tions, The American Red Cross,
Farm Bureau, Health and Welfare
League, Y. M. C. A., Knights of Co
lumbus, Bourbon .County Woman's
Club, Bourbon County Garden Club,
D. A. R.f U. D. C, Bourbon County
Medical Association, American Le
gion, War Mothers, .Community Ser
vice, Board of Education, County
and City, Board of Council, are re
quested to be present to voice the
sentiments of their respective bod
ies. Ladies are especially" invited.
' Let us mobolize the thought of
our county and express it co-operatively
through our Commercial Club
to further the interests of our city
and county.
Tickets will be one sale at the
office of the Commercial Club, W. S.
"Dale's restaurant, Worick Brothers,
and by the Ticket Committee.
PARCEL SALE UCESSFUL
The Sunshine Circle of the Pres
byterian church, composed of the
young members, with Miss Lucy
Colville in charge, cleared a hand
some sum at their parcel sale held
Saturday morning. Within one
hour -a total of $46 had been real
ized on the packages disposed of,
with a like proportion throughout
the sale.
The rummage sale held by the
Woman's Auxiliary of the same
church, in the Wilson building,, at
the corner of Main and Third
streets, was also a notable success
in the two days sale, realizing a
goodly sum, which will be devoted
to church purposes.
4
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It.
&
Clothes
Women"
-
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BOOTH OF
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THE FACTS IN THJJ BLUE GRASS
LEAGUE
The 1922 season of the Blue
Grass League is a thing of the past.
At its start, numbers of baseball
enthusiasts threw eold water upon
the proposition, and were heard to
remark that the Blue Grass League
would not last' as much as ten
days. However, the season has clos
ed with the League playing out its
entire schedule of games.
The first half of the season was
won by Maysville, with the Paris
team in second place. The second
half, judging from the papers of the
various towns, seems to be some
what in doubt. However, at 1he
close of the beason, the Paris team
had won twenty-four game and had
lost eighteen games. The Cynthia na
I team had also won twenty-four
games and had lost eighteen games,
thus leaving the Paris team and the
Cynthiana team tied for first place.
The Mt. Sterling team,' under the
management of Preacher Hill and
Hod Eller, an ex-snine ball artidt of
the Cincinnati Reds, who was act
ing as manager for the Mt. Sterling
team, claimed that they wQra wfn
ners of the peunant. Eller strived
to secure that position for his club
through techn;cahties and alleged
irregularities of both the Paris and
Cynthiana tearr.b, out upon investi
gation the records showed that tho
irregularities were not in the Cynthi
ana and Paris managmiu, but in
the management of the Mt. Sterling
team, who had failed to iile con
tracts 'ipon any player until the 29
day of Augast, of this year. Also
Potts t;ie iirs laseman ,f the Mt.
SterlUj team. w:ls by M;. r.irre'.l,
declarpi an cv.:.w. and nil of tln-
games won by J&t. Scrims, in
which Potts nla-.ed, were tfcrewn
out and not courted in the final
standing of the clubs. This elimin
ated Mt. Sterling from any claims
she had unon the nennanr ttTlpr
also declared that Noble Ballou was
an outlaw and not eligible to play
upon iiie Paris team. However,' Mr.
Farrell, the Chairman and Secretary
of the National Board of Arbitra
tion, disagreed with Eller, and said
that the standing of Noble Ballou
was O. K., and that Pari- was en
titled to the games in which he par
ticipated, thus leaving Cyathiana
and Paris tied for first place.
Then in order to settle the matter
as to who was the winner of the
second, half of the series, Jesse Mor
ton, the manager and owntr of the
Lexington club, volunteered the in
formation that he had .defeated
Cynthiana one game in which he
used a pitcher without sisrninfr thP
pitcher to a contract. This being
contrary to the rules of organized
baseball, this game was taken from
Cynthiana's losing column, leaving
Cynthiana as winning twenty-fojr
games and losing seventeen, thereby
finishing the season one-half a -game
ahead of Paris. Mr. Morton, the
manager and owner of the Lexing
ton team, voluteered this informa
tion, and for which confessed irreg
ularity he is liable to a severe fine.
In addition to the fine. Manaser
Morton failed to complete the season
with his club and forfeited several
games to Winchester and Mt. Ster
ling. It, is reported on reliable au
thority that his failure to complete
the season and also his confessed
irregularities in running his team
will be the cause of Mr. Morton los
ing the franchise of the Lexington
club. No action has been taken
upon this matter at the present, but
the Directors of the Blue Grass
League expect to act upon the same
at some future, date.
At the final winding up of the
season, Cynthiana was declared the
winner of the second half by one
tialf a game over the Paris club, and
is now playing off a series with
Maysville.
TAXPAYERS NOTICE
TO AVOID ERRORS AND
UNDERSTANDINGS WE
MIS-
WILL
NOT PAY TAXES POR OUR CUS
TOMERS UNLESS SPECIALLY IN
STRUCTED TO DO SO.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK,
FARMERS & TRADERS BANK.
PEOPLES - DEPOSIT BANK AND
TRUST CO.,
BOURBON -AGRICULTURAL BANK
& TRUST CO.
oct 6-to dec 1)
BIRTHS
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Isgrigg are
receiving congratulations upon the
advent of a ten-pound son at their
home in East Paris. The new heir
has been named David Isgrigg.
HEN'S OVERCOATS AT $25
Splendid values in
the' popular
belted ulater styles.
BASE BEL
In the game played under protest
at League Park, in " Paris, Friday
afternoon, the Mt. Sterling team
came from behind in the ninth in
ning and defeated the Mammoths by
a score 13 to 12. Paris entered a
protest at the beginning of the
game on account of Deveraux, for
merly of the Winchester team, play
ing with Mt. Sterling. It was stat
ed that Deveraux's contract with
the Winchester club did not expire
until next Thursday, October 12.
As the score indicated the contest
was a free-for-all in the hittins- or
der, Paris using four pitchers dur-
ing the nine 'innings. Nippert, Ci-
cona, Winger. Eller and Rittpr fig
ured in the hit column, Cicona get
ting two three-base hits. Cicona
was slightly injured in sliding
headlong into home plate.
The batteries were: For Paris
Wills, Cotter, Mueller, Woods and
Macke; for Mt. Sterling Ferrell.
Harrison and Lackev. TTmniroa
Broekman and Klnnn
According to published schedule
the Louisville Colonels will play
the Paris Mammoths at League Park
next Saturday, October 14. The
Colonels had, to travel ten innings
to defeat the Winchester team of
the Bluegrass League at Winchester,
Sunday. Hod, Eller,' former world
series star and present manager for
the. Mt. Sterling team, pitched for
Winchester, and was in splendid
form. The final score was 5 to 4.
Tincup 'started pitching for Louis
ville, but was relieved in the fifth
by Deberry, who was touched up
for ten hits, and four runs. Win
chester tied the score in the ninth,
Louisville putting over the winning
run in the tenth.
I The agony is at last over, and the
official seal has been placed on Cyn
thiana as winner of the second se
ries of the Blue Grass League race.
Paris fondly hoped to be the abiding
place of the pennant, and for a
while even the proverbial Philadel
phia lawyer would have been puz
zled to ascertain which team was to
be dubbed the champions. Mt. Ster
ling claimed it. Cynthiana was sure
it belonged there, and Paris thought
It was cinch, while Winchester and
Lexington were officially out of the
running. We are all gladAt is over,
but sorry Paris was euchered out
of the honor, which few of us doubt
belonged here the championship of
the Blue Grass League.
A proposal has been made at
Lwrencebur to' start a baseball
league next year with Lawrence
burg, Frankfort, Shelbyville, Har
rodsburg, Bloomfield and Bardstown
as members. And already there is
talk here of organizing a base ball
league in Bourbon county, composed I
or iNorin lviiaaietown, jacKsonvme,
Millersburg, Austerlitz, Escondida,
Hutchison, Ruddles Mills', Spears
Mill and Paris. Some league, that!
The first game of the Elue Grass
League championship series between
the Maysville and Cynthiana teams
was staged on the Cynthiana
grounds Sunday afternoon, resulting
after an uphill fight in the score be
ing tied in the eighth inning, and
the game called on account of dark
ness. The score then stood 6 to 6,
and no prospects of either team be
ing able to pull another run across
the plate before darkness settled
down over the conflict. Boskin
pitched a good game for Maysville
until the eighth inning when he
weakened, and this, coupled with
errors, netted the Cynthiana team
four runs. Monhollen, on the pitch
ing mound for Cynthiana strength
ened as the game progressed. Cyn
thiana's first run came in the fourth
inning, when Barker after hitting
for two bases, scored on a deep- sin
gle by Farley, The batteries were:
For Cynthiana, Monhollan and Bar
ker; for Maysville, Boskin and Con-'
nolly. The third and fourth games
in the series will be played at Mays- t
ville on next Thursday and Friday, '
the fifth at Cynthiana Saturday, and
the sixth contest at Maysville Sun
day. J
The Louisville Colonels, who" are
on a barn-storming tour through
Kentucky, will play the Cynthiana
team at Cynthiana to-morrow. j
o
EXPLAIN EXTENSION COURES j
The Bourbon County Teachers
Association met at the court house
Saturday morning, where they list
ened to addresses by Prof. Welling
ton Patrick and Dr. P. K. Holmes,
of the University of Kentucky -on
modern educational topics of special
interest to progressive teachers.
The program of . the extension
courses of the University to be given
in Paris this fall, winter and spring,
were outlined by the speakers, and
no speakers ever had a more 'atten
tive and interested audience.
L-o ':'
: WELL DRILLER
WrK.' Kearney, well driller, 'Ver-'
ITSCAL COURT PROCEEDINGS
The Bourbon Fiscal Court met in
regular session with County Judge
George Batterton, presiding, and the
following Magistrates present: F.
P. Lowry, Thomason, Burris, Tal
bott, Stephenson, Bell, Shropshire
and Turner.
The report of the Bourbon County
Road Commission was read, and fil
ed. The accounts for the past
month were allowed and ordered
paid.
A warrant for the sum of $36,
672.73 was ordered drawn in favor
of the Road Commissioner for re
pairs on the county pikes.
Magistrates Lowry and Thoma-
son were aPPinted a committee to
confer with the city authorities of
Paris in regard to purchasing an au
tomobile for use of the Visiting
Nurse for the Bourbon County
Health and Welfare League, Mrs.
Harriet B. Minaker.
County Attorney D. D. Cline was
appointed a special commission to
execute a deed from Bourbon county
to the Independent Tobacco Ware
house Company.
Magistrates Burris and Turner
were appointed a committee to in
vestigate and report on the advisa
bility, of trading lands with the
Catholic Cemetery, Co.
The Daughters of the American
Revolution were granted permission
to place a bronze tablet in the court
house.
Jos. Godman was elected keeper of
the County Infirmary for another
year at the same salary as is now
fixed, $100 per month.
Dr. A. B. Plummer was elected
Livestock Inspector of Bourbon
county for the ensuing year at the
same salary as is now fixed, $25 per
month.
NEW SEED CROPS '
NEW CROP MICHIGAN ROSEN
RYE TIMOTHY SEED.
BRENT & CO., INC.
(29-tf)
STATE MEETING U.D. C.
October 18 and 19 have
oeen
i
chosen as dates for the State Con-iJcmn Shropshire. '.. .' .'l00
vention of the United Daughters of j L Dodge . 100
the Confederacy, which will be held -r L T,rpnt 7r
at Louisville. Headquarters will be C '
at the Seelbach Hotel, and many'W- W' Kenney 50
plans are being made by the Louis- W M Ardery 50
ville chapter for the entertainment Amos Turney 50
of guests. iW. S. Haggard 50
FRANK & CO.
LADIES' OUTFITTERS
y
'HE right hat, the
j
right neck-piece, N
gives the cadiet of
distinction to the simplest
costume. Choose yours
here and you can not help
but choose aright!
i.
KRANK&CO.
LADIES' 'OUTFITTERS
y
HRE DESTROYS BAJtH AMI? AH? ' ' '
CONTENTS , Rf
One of the. most disastrous fire '
in Bourbon county for many years "
Friday night resulted in the de6- "
truction of the large barn belong
ing to Wm. M. Jones, near North, 4
Middletown, together with ten i
highbred saddle horses, a large 4
quantity of hay and feed, four
mules, three wagons, and farming - "
implements.
The barn is about 175 feet in'
length and was a mass of flames
when discovered. An explosion be
fore the fire was discovered blew th
roof off the biulding. The loft of
the barn had recently been filled
with soy bean fodder. It is thought
the fire and explosion resulted from
spontaneous combustion from the "-
fodder.
The ten horses were pedigreed
animals in various stages of train-
ing. The totaloss is approximately
$20,000, partly covered by insur
ance. The fire was seen for several T
miles around.
Fire. Wind aid Iigibuaf
tnce.
THOMAS. WOODFORD & BRYAN
BOURBON GUN CLUB
On account of the unavoidable
absence of Secretary Rudolph Davis,
who was called to Carlisle by the
death of his mother-in-law, Mrs.
Elizabeth Howse, the regular report
of the Bourbon Gun Club's shoot of
Wednesday was handed in too lat
for publication in Friday's issue.
The trophy, $10.00 in trade, donat
ed by Grinnell Bros., was won by
Alfred Clay, who 'rnade a scdre of
100 straight hits. There will be
but three more shoots, as the traps-
will be closed on November 1. The
following scores were made Wednes-r
dayr
Shot at
Broke
117,
100,
93
88
68
49
48
46.
44
A. B. Perkins 125
Alf. Clay 100
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