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The Bourbon news. (Paris, Ky.) 1895-19??, November 07, 1922, Image 2

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PAGE TWO
T-l ' !'" IP) '
THE BOURBON NEWS, PARIS, KENTUCKY
V; -l r-
M ' " ' 'II '
- TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1M1
m
- -
4 y
THE BOURBON NEWS
pttetttiked 18ri-41 Years of Con
tinnous Publication
Niliihed Every Tuesday and Friday
ftt Year $2.006 Months $1.00
Payable Cash in Advance.
PWIET dDLMP, Editor and Owner.
Entered at the Paris, Kentucky,
pMtoffie as Mail Matter of the
Second Class.)
OUi FOREIGN EEPEESENTA
x TIVES.
New York American Press Asso
tiatioiL Chicago Lord & Thomas.
Phikdelphia N. W. Ayers & Son.
Atlanta Massengale Adv. Agency
Cincinnati--Blaine Thompson Co
Lenisville Lowman-lliillican Co.
ADVERTISING RATES
Display Advertisements, $1.00 per
nch for first time; 50 cents per inch
each' subsequent insertion.
Reading Notices,, 10 cents per line
bach, issue; reading notices in black
type, 20 cents per line, each issue.
Cards of thanks, calls on candi
dates, obituaries and resolutions and
Similar matter, 10 cents per line.
"Special rates for large advertise
ments and yearly contracts.
The right of publisher is reserved
to decline any "advertisement or
other matter for publication.
Announcements for political offices
faiust invariably, be accompanied by
the cash.
Any erroneous reflection upon the
Character, standing or reputation of
any person, firm or corporation
.which may appear in the columns
of 'THE BOURBON NEWS will be
gladly corrected if brought to the
attention of the editor. "
EDITORIAL FLINGS
Kaiser Wilhelm is going to get
married again this month. Right
out of one war into another, it
seems.
Many a man's sense of humor
permits his wife to imagine herself
the boss of Jihe establishment. It
might just as well be that way, as
the "easiest' way out."
Our modern realistic novelists
are' giving us some very truthful
photographs of sewers and gutters.
Meanwhile Nature gives us dawns
and sunsets which, if not artistic,
are very satisfying and soliciting.
0
The hoot owl is a mournful bird
And wierd to hear at night.
He perches on the tree limb
And awakens you, in frights
But he is like a lot of men
For all his ghastly cries
His voice is all he has
And he is only pocket size.
Dr. Frank Crane, the eminent
specialist, says: "God forbid that
I should ever own a newspaper or
attempt to manage one. It takes
vaster quantities of both courage
and tact than I possess." Strange,
indeed that so many others have
had the courage (or the foolhardi
ness) to attempt it!
The wholesale optical association
-has declared against the return of
long skirts for women. This is as
mean a thing as when the under
takers association in convention at
Atlantic City after the war passed
a, resolution asking the government
to bring back all the soldiers who
irere killed in Europe.
The prospect of having turkey
for Thanksgiving in the average
home isnot very flattering at this
time, as prices are high and still
raising, with a reported shortage
in the Southern crop. The Ken
tucky crop is about normal, but
-with the shortage elsewhere we
shall have to be thankful for a nice
fat little hen. with some oysters on.
the site.
We see in the daily papers that
women are more than holding their
own just at this time. We note
that there are fifteen women being
tried in different parts of the coun-
ry foe the murder of men, while
only seven men are being tried for
the murder of women. Compared
-with the same week last year it
geems the women are gaining "at the
ratio of two to one.
It has been said by an expert
that mt one American in fifty can
name all the" Presidents of the
United States in their order. And
yet there are hundreds of people
right here in Paris who can give
the batting averages of all the base
"ball teams, and call the roll of the
moviag picture stars and staresses.
Nothimg is more needed right now
than a little honest-to-goodness
l.tea&hiag of American history and
traditioa.
o
Alut tiie only time the average
mam aa his wife agree is when they
afre U get married
PARIS HIGH
THE EYES AND THE MOVIES
Do the movies hurt the eyes?
"If they do it is usually due to
J
the fact that the eyes themselves
are defective.
Years ago, in the days of the ,nic
kelodeon, most moving pictures
were mechanically imperfect, many
of the films giving a sort of a rain
storm effect. The machines were
not firmly anchored and there was
much vibration. Such pictures
could easily cause serious eye strain,
The modern moving picture can-
not be considered a cause of eye
strain. Of course, it should be
viewed under favorable conditions.
UUC &UUU1U UUL OIL Uil ct 1CVC1 IUWC1
than the picture, nor too close to
lH M V .! 3 4- -.5- X A 1 -.! 1 J. -...SIM
the screen, nor outside of an angle appreciate tneSe items, taken at herd was of the celebrated Duchess
of thirty degrees to the plane of the random from a copy of THE BOUR- of Goodness family. He also re
screen. If one sits well back in the BON NEWS, of Wednesday, March ceived at the same ime other cups
house' on a level or above the screen 23, 1881: and pitchers from the Warren coun
and directly in front of the picture fv nhiM nniiv
tliere can be no eye-strain if one's
eyes are free from defect.
It is safe to say, if your eyes are
not comfortable at the movies, your
eyes are at fault anil not the picture.
The moving picture is a sort of an
eye device. If one's eyes are defec
tive, the moving picture- discloses
that fact.
When we consider that seven peo
ple out of every ten have defective
eyes we realize the importance of
modern optometric work in the con
servation of vision.
Better Vision Week is to be ob-
served throughout Kentucky Novem-;
ber 6th to 11th. Addresses will be
made in the principal cities by lead-
ing optometrists.
Dr. R. C. Augustine, Past Presi-
dent of the American Optometric As-
sociation, will deliver a series of ad- A Paris wag says, "Off-utt it
dresses in a number of cities during . don't take hard work to climb that
this week. Dr. Augustine is the legislative Hill, I don't know what
leading exponent of a square deal it do take."
for the school child and has spoken ' If you want to vote for the rail
in more than one hundred and fifty road, do so; and if you don't. A
Canadian and American cities. i great many people expect to don'tx
The Kentucky Optometric Associ-j Charlton Alexander purchased the
ation is sponsoring this great cam- Ben stipp farm in tne ciintonville
paign which has for its object the precinct, at $68 per acre, for 140
education of our people to the value ' acres
vl visiou auu me miyui iim;e ui
proper eye-care.
o-
NATI0NAL HOME TOR CHAMBER
OF COMMERCE
American business is soon to
-.---., . .,
liovu o now $9. Rftft OHO homo m trio
National Capital, 'word has just
reached the Paris Commercial Club
. , .. . .... . citement instead of the quiet elec-
the construction of the building to .. ... x ,
, , , . jtion which was expected,
be occupied as headquarters in , . T . . .
. . J Frank Harper, of Midway, has
as ing on y i priced Ten Broeck, nine years old,
Commerce of tihe United States. . ' - '
-err , u v i n v .JDy ImP- Phaeton, at $75,000. It fs
Work on the building will begin , ' ;
, TA i .. 'thought some Kentucky editor will
immediately. It is hoped to com-! ... .. . r
, , .. . f... . -soon gobble the roadster up.
xl.u . ui... uvm-iw ,,...... .w.
Iwelve months time. Already
buildings which occupied the site,
including the old home of Daniel
Webster, have been razed to make
room for the new' headquarters.
The corner-stone for the new
building was laid recently during
the tenth annual meeting held un-
der the auspices of the National
Chamber.
Present and former Sec-.
retaries of the Department of Com -
r
merce and leading business men!,
from all over the country partici
pated in the ceremonies. The
speakers were Secretary of Com
merce and Labor Charles Nagel, L.
S. Gillette, chairman of the build-
jng committee, Harry A. Wheeler
and Joseph H. Defrees, former pres
ident of the Chamber.
BOY SWALLOWED ELECTEIC
LIGHT BULB
Harry JLee Waterfield, 10-year-old
son of Mrs. Lois Waterfield, of Mur -
ray. Ky., who swallowed an electric
light bulb, while repairing-a flash
light, has felti no inconvenience
from it, alhough it has been in his
stomach several days. The boy
placed the bulb in his mouth for
safekeeping and swallowed it when
his mind became centered on the
work of repairing the light.
o
The Unattainable.
Jud Tunkins says a circus poster
illustrates some folks' Idea of a beau
tiful world and a happy existence.
Washington Star.
SCHOOL FOOT BALL TEAM, 1922
D'YE MIND THE TIME
YXTTiA'M TVincn Tli i-n rea TTnTinanorl T-m
nMW- -p ., m ,,, mwr?
NEWS- Files?
1
DA.yg DF ATJLD LANG- SYNE
-
There's no denying that to most
0f us there is a certain satisfaction
in reviewing' the events of long ago, '
as they are presented to us, either
casually or by force of some remin-
iscent strain of the moment. And
to those who lived here in the long
f the recalling of events in the
s f Par affords a peculiar
- w - w - V.. . " JC -
haps, more than we who have
P-rrvwm liRPri in thp nlri nlan.P. will
Dr. .0. H. Buck, of Ohio, is
here
I
nn n visit-
diary made the second and success
or. Barnes has been very ill for ful- attempt at burning the large
several days. .'livery stable rented by James S.
Mrs. Gus Pollock has gone on a
vit lu uwiuumci, at majrnciu, xvy.
Capt. James M. Thomas left yes-
terday morning for New York, on
railroad business.
Dr. Cox, of Lexington, will
'preach in the Christian church, this
city, next Sunday.
Rev. S. F. Taylor, of the Baptist
church; preached on "Man's Chief
End," on Sunday morning last,
Mrs. John Moreland's farm was
bid to $3.50 per acre, at a public
renting Saturday, and was taken
down.
a ua aiViof -Qc
marching
around, the band begins to play-
thus it is with Hill and the other
candidates.
. Arthur Keller, recent graduate at'((he wife of T R Roche of Paris a
J a Louisville law school, has located' firgt t,orn
n Rhnwhnn Station fnr fho r-ran-
.. ... .
itice of his profession.
1
The legislative canvas is betting
I u here and the boys are
loolrinf forwnrrl to oomo littlo o-v
. ml, ,,,, n.An1An,n y l.r.,1,1
j.uc JUUU& 5CUUCUICU ui uuiui-
ana, will give a fashionable, -hop at
Aolian Hall, on Friday night. April
1st, for benefit of Cynthiana Or
chestra. Admission $1.50.
Kelly Brent, Emmett Dickson,
Major John B. Holladay. Frank'
Armstrong and the other candidates!
are following the show around at
the different precincts.
j Dan Dailey, a brakeman on Dick
' .... , . .. . ,
RstAn's frpiernt wninn -mTrrnorl V10
, ... .
track near Maysville, on Monday,
fell under the train and got his leg
so mashed that amputation was
necessary. j
Henry Singer has sold his farm
of 41 acres, to Matt Howard for $4,-' T mi,A . a u . . i i
AnA , ' . .. ' i Judge Clarke held thauthe clerk
000, and will move to Scott county.!. , ,,,. .. . . ..
,-. e. .. . . ihad no authority to place the name
Mr. Singer, it will be remembered,! . MA.An1. .-. - . -
- , . . . ,, . ., . i of candidates on the ballot for the
had to pay big money for striking . , . ,. x
, r . , x- . - &i November election and that the
a. muiciLtu gin ol Lnis city.
Senator John S. .Williams passed
through here Monday with a scrap
- "e. "-r r n eye, the present incumbent who wag
!havinf wePfc hls eyes almost out.;elected fQr twQ &nd
' oyer the crownmg .sheep-killing act successor shaU have been elected
I C 1J X 1 J 1 !-
OI"lu ranone.
! Th& vetera edlfr lol ; Craddock.
has kept his bead to Millersburg
I unusually hot the past few days.)
I Tf- llOO TrtrtT n nnnnKAn -k? 3A11.
AU "BO "cc" rt i"" " uuuut,
whether it was his sours-sal vaion,
or his heart's pactification, in which
he has been so deeply interested.
John C. Young, of Danville, 'will
lecture at the court house to-night
and to-morrow night,
from "The
Lost Arts," and "The Rocks Ahead." : up fKe street he ran gleefully
He charges fifty cents for the same into the house, exclaiming, "Ohmoth
leciure here that he charges twen- er, mother, here comes my auntie me,"
ty-five cents for at North Middle
tow - 7
George Martm, tne popular young
l-.-i.olr am on rt-rt riaTf .TnVlTITI io "HTni-
tin's passenger train, is acting con-
ctor prollemf .'" ?ick fte?'
place on the freight train, during
Dicl's absence while he is off a few
days, in consequence of some severe
biuises, from the jumping train on
Monday.
G. M. Bedford received- last Sat-
urday from the Agricultural State
Board i Columbus. O., the cup he
won last fall on tne best nerd 0f
catUe bred and owned by Exhibitor,
This .g tfae firgt ingtance we know of
of
family bred and owned by one man,
ever WOn SUCh UOnorS. Mr. JU. S
J
On Saturday night last, an mcen-
Offutt. About 12 o'clock the fire
was discovered, but the fire 'engine
bl()ke somethingf of COUrse, and the
flames soon lapped out the inflama-
ble stable, together with the resi-
dence adjoining, belonging to Mrs.
Kelley. There were seven head of
horses consumed in the flames;
among them two horses belonging
to Henry Turney, one valued at $1,
000, one valued at $300, together
with his new $300 buggy, $50,
sleigh, sulky and several sets of
harness; W. B. Smith, three fine
horses; Mr. Tipton, of New York,
one horse that he gave$200 for a
few days ago; Ed. S. Ford, one
horse, and Mrs. Kelley, who loses
her comfortable two-story brick
residence. None of the property
was insured. Mr. Offutt lost a large
lot of feed, harness and other arti
cles. H. C. Sharp has been appointed
gauger for Clay Bowen's distillery,
at Ruddles Mills, and will go on
duty this week.
James Haslip, a brakeman on
Captain James Winston's freight
train had both feet cut off by the
cars Thursday last.
"Rom. on Fridav nie-ht last, to
Douglas Thomas, ' North Middle-
town, Ky., has sold to G. N. Brag-
eWf chicag0) Jll8f the cnestnut
&elding See Saw, by Darlbay, dam
by American Clay. Record 2:27,
and price $3,000.
SCHOOL COMMISSIONERS HOLD
- 0FEICE TO 1923.
The 1922 act relating to the
election of school trustees repeals
the 1920 act and school commis
sioners now in office will hold until
the provisions of the 1922 act be
come operative in 1923 the Court
i of Appeals held in overruling the
motion to dissolve the tempo
rary injunction granted Nick Reid
in theBath Circuit Court enjoining
County Clerk Cole Barnes placing
i the names of- candidates on he
. ballot. -
The order was written by Judge
Ernest Clarke and was concurred
in by Chief Justice Rollin Hurt
and Judges Gus Thomas and Chas.
ATnnrmnn.
Circuit Judge of Bafah county did
right in issuing the restraining or
der.
.TiifJp-A ninrtia nlcn Violrl fh
, w. 0 ,.o vj "1U fciitn.
and Qualified" under the act of
1920 j! remaill ,n Qfflce
of diyideg. tne
ftllTlf. B . . ow ,. . . .
lK3 WCUiUCD
operative.
"MeV Arrival.
Barbara had been named for. her
' "iamotner an aunt in Wisconsin.
I Cn nna rnaenn yitViIIa vfatflnnr In V&
-m u " s "
!UB
GRADES? 1CH00
001
fi
The following is the honor roll
for the months of October of the
Little Rock; Graded School:
Primary Department Elaine
Brierly, 94 1-3; Woodrow Hinkle,
94; Juanita Lowry, 92 2-3.
Intermediate Department Ju
lian Reid, 93 3-4; Rachel Banister,
929; Christine McKenzie, 98 718;
J. T. Hinkle, 92 7-8.
Grammar and High School De
partment Elizabeth Sue Thomas,
96 5-7; Nancy B. McClure, 93 3-7;
Boyd Caywood. 92 2-3.
LOST
At Paris High School, or on the
streets of Paris, a diamond ring,
with small set. Finder please leave
at THE NEWS office and receive re
ward. PLANT BULBS NOW
Just received direct from Holland,
Tulips, Hayacinths. Narcissus, Jon-
jquils and Crocus. Come and get
yours to-day.
J. SMITH,
Cumb. Phone 915 Second Street.
(nov3-3t)
FOR SALE.
One-ton Ford truck, in good con-
dition. Call either phone 221.
(3-2t)
CAHAL BROS.
BABBEB SHOP
4r-WHITE BABBEBS-4
Modern Equipment.
Expert and Polite Service
HOT AND COLD BATHS
n
PARIS, KY,
Btgan Business Jan. 3, 1916
Capital
$60,000.00
SURPLUS.
$26,000.00
'I.
JL"
OFFICERS
Frank' P. Kiser, PrMldeat
B. I. Wttthers, Vlc PrwHhat
17. Tfl. "Mitchell. Caskler
Jbo. W. TtrkM, AjwH'CMhUr
Dab pMd( Jr., BookhMptr. . .
june 3t, isa
JIUJIUJIr JMJlilrr I4-U! JWUJL
FARMERS
ii
Try Us With That Next Job!
We Print :
Anything
Any Time
PRINTING
THE NEWS JOB
"WffvfwIWttv
i
We Handle
I Electrical
Electric Washing Machines, Irons, Toasters,
Broilers, Chafing Dishes, Electroliers, All
Kinds of Bulbs, Etc.
Gas Heaters
All Sizes and Prices. Gas .Logs and Grates
That are Very Practical and Ornamental.
t
T. W,
MAIN STREET
FOR SALE
Good gas heating stove.
WM. S. DALE,
At Dale Restaurant. Main St.
(nov3-2t)
Administrator's Notice!
All persons having claims against
the estate, of Richard Strother, de
ceasedr are hereby requested to pre
sent same, properly proven, as re
quired by law, to the undersfgned
Administrator, for adjustment and
payment.
All persons knowing themselves
indebted in any way to the estate of
the said Richard Strother, are
hereby notified to call on the under
signed Administrator and make full
and prompt settlement of such in
debtedness. NEWTON STROTHER,
Administrator of Richard Strother.
(10-lmo)
5
INTERURBAN TIME
TABLE
Paris to
Lexington
7:05 a. m.
8:05 a. m.
9:05 a. m.
10:05 a. m.
Lexhigfon
To Paris
6:00 a. m.
7:00 a. m.
8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
10:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
12:00 m.
1:00 p. m.
2:00 p. m.
3:00 p. m.
4:00 p. m.
5:00 p. mm
6:00 p. m!
7:00 p. m.
9:10 p. m.
:2j! a- m
12:05 p. m.
1:05 p. m.
2:05 p. m.
3:05 a. m.
4:05 p. m.
5:05 p. m.
6:05 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:15 p. m J
10:05 p. m.
11:55 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Cash Fare, 60c; Ticket Fare, 54c.
Commutation 52 trip monthly book,
$12.00. Tickets, single trip, or in
quantities, date unlimited, sold be
tween all points at reduced rates.
KENTUCKY TBACTI0N & TEE
MINAL CO.
(dec6-tf)
BRIGHTBILi
- a
JVVJVmir?
Just History
In 76 t
The Colonial Dame
Spnn her cloth
By Candle flame.
In 1860 ;
In Crinoline bright,
She greeted her guesti
By Coal Oil light
And later on,
How time doei put
Her home was lit
By flickering Gas.
But' tit' girl of to-day
Who wants her hone bright,
Jmst presses a bittern
Aad has Eleetrio light
Paris Ga$& Eke trk Co.
All Work
Deliyered
On Time
DEPARTMENT
iAit AiTi flit 4 A fifl f"
All Kinds of
Novelties !
SPICER
orr. court house j
fmm
SCL -
"" mum""" mini
f--
-5
O-
s -t
'I.

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