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The Bourbon news. (Paris, Ky.) 1895-19??, November 10, 1922, Image 1

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THE
"1
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PUBLISHED EVERY TUESDAY AND FRIDAY IN THE YEAR.
S
VOLUME. XLI I
X if
PARIS, BOURBON COUNTY, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1922
NEWS
BOURBON
"PROHIBITION OFFICIALS STAGE
INVESTIGATIONS HEBE
Elections, rumors of war, the sit
uation in the Far East, foot ball,
and all other absorbing topics had
to take a back seat in" the city yes
terday, when it became known
that prohibition officers had visited
a number of Paris business houses
and made two arrests as a result
of their investigations. Such news
creates more excitement in Paris
than would the resumption of the
great world war.
F. G. Fields, B. F. Unthank and
W. C. White, prohibition enforce
ment officials from the Lexington
office, accompanied by Hayes Green,
of Barbourville, came to Paris yes
terday morning, and equipped with
search warrants, visited a number
of places on Main stret, searching
the premises thoroughly and inspect
ing soft drinks at several places.
Their search was unrewarded and
fruitless, as all the places visited
showed clean bills and free from
suspicion.
Extending their field of opera
tions the officials under authority
of their warrants, arrested Edward
Herrin, of Paris, as he was enter
ing the First National Bank build
ing, and, it was alleged, after a
search, found a half-pint of moon
shine on his person. Going to
Herrin's room in the Dow building,
they instituted a search, and fin
ally found a copper still, with a
capacity of thirty gallons, in opera
tion, with about a gallon of moon
shine newly-made. The still was
warm when found. The officials
destroyed the still and confiscated
the liquor. Shortly after this
they placed Joe Frakes, of Paris,
under arrest, on a charge of inter
ferring with officers in the dis
charge of their duty, alleging that
he had attempted to "tip off" their
visit to Herrin and others.
TURKEYS
WE WILL OPEN TO RECEIVE
TURKEYS FOR THE THANKSGIV
ING MARKET COMMENCING ON
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13.
BRENT & CO., (Inc.)
(nov7-tf) Both Phones 14.
GOOD OYSTERS
We have a shipment every day
stewing size and New York Counts.
C. P. COOK & CO.
"THE PRIDE
TO LOOK ELSEWHERE
MEANS QUICK SALES HERE
Our styles look expensive but our
prices are unusually reasonable
And to those who have made
comparisons elsewhere selections
here are quickly made
LOVELY
WINTER
COATS
In an unending variety of soft
fabrics that have all the richness
and lustre that only fine coats could
have
Fashiona Lustrosa Omdura
Verona Velverette Veldyne and , K
Panvelaine ,
Navy Sorrento Reindeer Brown .
WITH
SELF COLLARS
or with bright luxurious collars of
Platinum Wolf Fox Squirrel and
Beaver
DEPARTMENT STORE
PARIS, KENTUCKY
PARIS CITY SCHOOL NOTES,
Misses Zerelda Nolan and Lula
Blakey, English teachers in the
Paris High School, will attend the
conference of English teachers in
Chattanooga, November 30. Decem
ber 1 and 2. This is the National
Council of Teachers of English,
and it is the Qrsfc time jit, has met
in the South. ""
Miss Ellen Blanding, supervisor
of Music in the Paris City Schools,
was notified this week that she had
been apponted a member of the
State Advisory Committee of Ken
tucky for the National Music As
sociation of America. The next
meeting will be held in April, 1923,
in Cleveland, Ohio, and wll be one
of the most important musical
meetings held in America next
year. Miss Blanding's chief du
ties as a member of, the committee
will be to bring before the meet
ing some of the musical conditions
and needs of Kentucky.
One of the most important and
attractive evening classes to be or
ganized in Paris this winter will be
a class started Monday night, No
vember 13. Ths class will be
taught by Mr. Horace Miller Clay,
of the University of Kentucky,
Last year Mr. Clay conducted an
evening class in Paris in shop
mathematics and mechanical
drawing. This year his subject
will be vocational mathematics
and applied electricity. The courses
are planned for men who have not
had the advantage of college cours
es in electrical engineering, but
who wish to obtain some practical
knowledge of electrical engineering.
The mathematics is taught in con
nection with electricity, so that the
student may better grasp the sub
ject. The courses in applied electric
ity comprises the fundamental laws
of electricity and magnetism a. c.
and d. c. dynamos and motor
power transportation, lightning,
wiring transformers and storage
batteries. The above is presented
in such a way as to be understood
by the average practical mind. They
will be both enjoyable and benefi
cial and larger enrollment is ex
pected. The Extension Courses in Hy-
giene and Shakespeare will not
will
meet to-morrow, Saturday, Novem-
ber 11, on account of the Armistice
Day celebration, but will meet on
Saturday, November 18, as usual.
o
And yet, there may be days whenior By-The-Wayside-Historical Club,
en a skunk can't lay up a scent. representing the signing of the New
even
OF PARIS
u
fc-
ARMISTICE DAY CELEBRATION
HERE TO-MORROW
Armistice Day, that day of sor-
'row, and yet of joys and tender
memories marking the close of a
great world war, and the roll call
of thousands of heroes who gave up
their lives in defense of the world's
freedom, will be appropriately cele
brated in this city to-morrow, as it
will be in thousands of other places,
fwith appropriate ceremonies.
One of the chief features of the
program will be the dedication of
the Memorial Building, at the cor
ner of High street and Broadway,
and the unveiling of a bronze tab
let, on which is inscribed the names
;Of those patriotic Bourbon county
tboys who died in defense of "lib
'erty, justice and peace." This tab
let was placed in position on the
wall on the Broadway side of the
building Tuesday by Mr. F. S. Ha
'gan, a world-war veteran, and Mr.
T'rank Thomas, of the Murphy &
Thomas Monument Co., of Paris. It
is a beautiful specimen of the
bronze founders art, of a neat and
chaste design, surmounted by a
bronze eagle, holding a scroll in his
talons.
Judge George Batterton chair
man of the Committee on Arrange-
I'ments, and composed of Miss Lucy
Blythe Simms, Mrs. Wm. O. Hinton
and Prof. Lee Kirkpatrick, assisted
by representatives from the various
patriotic and civil organizations of
the county, will assist in the cere
monies. The principal address will
be delivered by Attorney W. C. G.
Hobbs, of Lexington, an orator of
great eloquence.
Representatives from the Ameri
can Legion Posts of neighboring
towns will be present and take part
in the ceremonies. At the close of
the program a lunch of sandwiches,
coffee and pie will be served to the
Legion boys, in the Memorial Build
ing, by the members of the D. A.
R., the U. D. of C. and the Bourbon
County War Mothers.
The line of march to-morrow
will form at the Seventh street en
trance of the Paris High School, at
10:30 o'clock, and will be as fol
lows: Police Department; Fire Depart
ment; City Officials; County Offlci-
als; Boy Scouts, with their band,
leading a chorus of Paris City
School children, Floats, Senior
'class, By-The-Wayside History
Club, representing the "Big Four"
in France, with "Peace" towering
over their seats: Float, bv the Jun-
Declaration of Independence in
1919; Cincinnati Band; Bourbon
Post, American Legion, and delega
tions from Legion Posts from other
towns.
The parade will proceed down
'Seventh street to Main, to Broad-
iway, to the Memorial Building,
',where the following program will
! be carried out: Prayer, Rev. O. B.
Crockett; Raising of the colors over
the Memorial Building by Bourbon
Post, American Legion, with mili
tary honors; music; address by W.
C. G. Hobbs, of Lexington; unveil
ing of .bronze tablet to the memory
of the Bourbon county boys who
gave their lives in the world war,
by Commander T. S. Smylie, of
Bourbon Post, American Legion,
who will place a laurel wreath at
Its base; benediction by Rt. Wal
ter S. Cain.'
n In 1 utherance of the alms and
objects- of Armistice Day Mayor B.
B. January has issued the following
proclamation, calling on the people
of Paris to join in observance oC
the day in the proper spirit:
To the Citizens of Paris, Ky.
Greetings: Armistice Day is and
should be to all who love their
country, who honor valor, who
cherish noble deeds and purifying
sacrifices a holy, sacred day.
I therefore call upon every citi
zen of this city to observe this day;
to join with the ex-service men and
women of this city, with
the
American Legion and the society of
foreign wars and to assist in any
way in the ceremonies commemo
rating the services of Bourbon
county soldiers and sailors and to
vow allegiances and fealty to the
great principles that gave our coun
try birth; that has preserved it,
and with the support of its patri
otic sons and daughters will assure
the future greatness of the coun
try and will bring glory to the re
public. E. B. JANUARY,
Mayor.
Kentuckians are called upon to
join with the men and women who
served in the World War to com
memorate the services of Ken
tucky's soldiers and sailors in a
proclamation issued by Governor
MJorrow. The proclamation fol
lows: ' "To the People of Kentucky,
Greeting:
"Armistice Day is, and should be
to all who love their country, who
honor valor, who cherish noble
deeds and purifying' sacrifices, a
holy, sacred day. "This day marked
COURT NEWS
Rev. William Dunson, m colored,
former TJastor of t.hp rnlrvrprl "RnTitiat
church, of Millersburg, has filed
, , v.t,w.w.
suit in the Bourbon Circuit Court,
thrrmp-h h Qfv t?,, n
through hs attorney, Raymond Con-
neii, against the Trustees of thel
church, for the unpaid portion of
his salary, amounting to $250, and
for breach of contract. In his peti
tion he claims he was dismissed
from the pastorate without just
cause, and that he has been unable
to secure another position, all of
Whinh WS riflTnnp-inP'' tn "hia finan-
cial prospects and his pride in thedles Mi"s Precinct No. 3 not a vote
sum of $250, as asked for. !was. eB' Jor memDers of the
I TUT-nc Tl O tt A e T3 i.
.. v..u . .LW II U,. I., J. UUU1UUU
county, filed suit in the Circuit
Court against Frederick A. Wallis,
of New York, who owns two large
bluegrass farms in Bourbon county,
for the sum of $338.58, alleged to
be due her as share of a crop of to- i
bacco raised on the shares. She
alleged that she had a verbal
agreement with Mr. Wallis to raise
the crop on a fifty-fifty basis; that
Mr. Wallis sold the tobacco to the I
Burley Tobacco Association for $1,
117.16, making Mr. Wallis' indebt
edness to her $558.58, subject to
credit amounting to $170.00, leav
ing the balance, $338.58.
( In the Fayette Circuit Court at
"Lexington, Joseph and Sam Hous
ton, former Bourbon county farm
ers, defendants in a $500 damage
feuit filed by Clarence Lebus, were
given a verdict for $717.97, by the
jury. In his suit Lebus claimed
the defendants unlawfully detained
three hundred sacks of wheat dur
ing the 1920 threshing season.
The judgment carries interest on
tlie total amount from 1920 until
it is paid and directs that the de
fendants' costs be paid by the plain
tiff.
TO TURKEY RAISERS
WE WILL BE BUYERS
TURKEYS THIS SEASON AND
WILL BEGIN RECEIVING AT OUR
FLOUR MILL AND HEMP HOUSE
ON SOUTH MAIN STREET ALSO
AT OUR OFFICE BUILDING ON
THIRD AND PLEASANT, MON
DAY. THE 13 OF NOVEMBER.
WE WILL PAY THE HIGHEST
MARKET PRICE.
E. F. SPEARS & SONS.
(nov7-tf)
DECLARES ARMISTICE DAY LE
GAL HOLIDAY
Armistice Day, Saturday, t No- '
vember 11, has been declared a-
State holiday by Governor Edwin
P. Morrow, in a statement issued
at Somerset, where he had gone to
vote.
"The purpose of the Armistice '
Day proclamation," Governor Mor
row said, "was to set apart the day
as a legal holiday and I call upon
all Kentuckians to observe the day
as such."
Bankers throughout the State
raised the question as to whether
Armistice Day was to be observed;
as a legal holiday.
. o
DILL PICKLE
Just . received a"' barrel of iill
picmes. finest quality anai appe
tizing. ' LOGAN HOWARD.
! RAGLAN SLEEVE OVERCOATS
Welted models in many new fab-
'rics some as low at $25.
J. W. DAVIS & CO.
for the world the close" of its most
titantic struggle and brough
us as a nation peace with
a glorious victory. To heroes
dead and our heroes living,
and to those who sacrificed
. the very heart, the soul of their
soul, and the core of their great
love, this day is dedicated.
"It is a day of remembering, a
day of recalling services rendered
and sacrifices made, a day of re
solving that the dead shall never
be forgotten and the living shall
ever be honored. It is a day to re
kindle the fires of patriotism, to
trim the torch of our national con
science and to highly resolve that
what was won for us in blood and
tears shall not be lost to us
through sloth and easy living.
"I, therefore, call upon every cit
izen of the commonwealth to ob
serve this day, to join with the ex
service men and women of the
country with the American Legion
and the Society of Foreign, Wars,
and to assist in every way in the
ceremonies commemorating the ser
vices of . Kentucky's soldiers and
tailors, and to vow allegience and
fealty to the great principles that
gave our country birth, that has"
preserved it, and with the support
'of its patriotic sons and daughters,
will assure the future greatness of
the w country and 'bTingnew glory to
I the-"republic." ,
TUESDAYS ELECTION
The election in Bourbon county
Tuesday was one of the least inter
esting held in many years, due to
ihe apathy of voters. There was no
a!"w""uii lu j. oampoeu uanuriii,
... A T . ., .!!
reTauc canamaie lor re-eiection
ias Congressman from the Seventh
Democratic candidate for re-election
I f!rmrrnaainnil T"Hof vin
No inter
est was taken in the election, and
no effort was made to get voters
to the polls. Out of a total vote of
5,000 in the county, with three
'precincts missing out of the thirty
five, only 532 votes were cast.
The three missing precincts
will add but a few votes. In Rud-
JTrtilH .DUttl u vl .uaucauon, a. a.
Hancock received 302 votes, S. S.
Ardery, Jr., 300, and Dr. Raymond
R. McMillan, 302.
Miss Eleanor Lytle, .daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Omar G. Lytle, has
the distinction of being the first
woman election officer in Bourbon
county, she serving in that capac
ity Tuesday at the Court House
voting booth.
o
MASS MEETING FOR MEN AND
BOYS.
TO WHOM IT CONCERNS:
AND THAT MEANS EVERY
BOY IN THIS COMMUNITY.
THERE WILL BE A MASS MEET
ING FOR YOU SUNDAY AFTER
NOON AT THREE O'CLOCK IN
;THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
THE SPEAKER IS DR. J. ERN
EST THACKER AND THE SUB
JECT IS "WHAT CONSTITUTES
A FOOL?"
WILL IT BE WORTHWHILE?
YOU DECIDE IT.
LOSES VALUABLE DOG
"Jeanne VanGronigan," ar valua -
ble police dog, belonging to James
Clay Ward, of this city, and regis-
0Fftered in the American Kennel Club,
was run over by an automobile at
the corner of Fifteenth and High
streets, sustaining injuries that
caused death. At the time of
the accident the dog was accom
panying Mrs. Ward. The identity
of the person driving the auto was
not learned. The animal was the piTE, HAS BATH, GAS, ELEC
dam of a fine dog, "Laddie," now TKIC LIGHTS, LOCATED ON
owned by A. B. Hancock, in this mVm CLIFTON AVENUE.
for $265 PUPS I BOURBON LUMBER CO.
' ' (aoT25-tf
litis Bf "-iPT y iB
Special Sale
Sport Hose
Mxtra
50c
75c
$1.00
THE PAIR
Silk Clocks and Fancy Mixtures
See North Window
KRANK&CO
SADIES' OUTFITTERS
-V:
THE GRIDIRON FIELD
Full of confidence, inspired' by
their recent victory over- tlie- New
port team in last Friday's gridirom
battle, the Paris High. School war
riors will leave ths morning' for
Somerset, where they hope to take
the scalp of the Pulaski' boys. Pari
Hi will take with them, a bunck pf
Tooters, who will help to bolster
the huskies up to the winning poimt.
Somerset, though the- home of the
redoubtable "Red" Roberts, of the
Center College team, still boasts of
several other good' players- and Paris
Hi realizes that a hard! struggle .Si
ahead of their for the afternoon,
but "Carry on" is to be' the word.
G-
HUNTING SEASON OPENS NEXT
WEDNESDA3T
The hunting season opens nex
Wednesday, and every son-of-a-gun
who can get hold of a dog, a gun
and a hunting license, will be out
in, the fields bombarding quail and
rabbits, with more or less good
luck.
Those who intend to hunt should
not fail to provide themselves with
a hunting license,, and: have- it witli
them at all times in the field. They
must also remember that the bag
limit is twelve quail per day, in
stead of fifteen, as erroneously
published recently. The limit on
rabbits is fifteen per day, and mo
more, to each hunter.
Many lands have been "posted"
and the consent of the landowner,
or the farmer who is occupying the
.land must be secured, before hunt
ing. Game Warden A. W. Bullock, with
the earnest co-operation and as
sistance of the Bourbon County
Game and Fish' Cub, will be on the
job at all times, and it would he .
;well for everyone to know that
these conscientious sportsmen will
use everv effort to annrehend and
' convict all violators of- the game
laws, irrespective .of their station,
jn iife.
0
NEW HOUSE FOR SALE
NEW 7-ROOM HOUSE COM-
Values
at
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if
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