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The Bourbon news. (Paris, Ky.) 1895-19??, November 14, 1922, Image 1

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THE
A
PUBLISHED EVERY TUESDAY AND FRIDAY IN THE YEAR.
; , ,fc,K
VOLUME. XLI I
PARIS, BOURBON COUNTY, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1922
BOURBON
NEWS
1 ,. ' -4 Wi
30UEB0N mSTOBY ATTRACTING
GREAT INTEREST
The History of Bourbon County's
Part in the Word War, in four vol
umes, as compiled by Mrs. Fannie
fcelle Sutherland and Mrs. Allie
Dickson, recently on display in the
window of Shire & Fithian, is at
tracting widespread interest, especi
ally with the parents and friends
of our 6oldier boys, whose war rec
octs are here given as complete as
it was possible to be obtained.
Biese records are for the most part
in manuscript and when it is under
stood that this is the only complete
record to be had, their value in a
measure may be estimated.
On Saturday, November 11, these
volumes were removed to the Sol
flier's Memorial Building, after
which they were officially placed in
a fire-proof vault in the Bourbon
County Court House, where they
will be accessible to the public.
The committee is especially desirous
that the boys look over the volumes
and see their Tecords, all of which
will entitle Bourbon county an envi
able chapter in History of the
Word War.
To the compilers of these vol
umes, not only the Kentucky Coun
cil of Defense, but the people of
Bourbon county to a man, feel a
tteep sense of gratitude to these ex
cellent women for the magnanimous
gift they have contributed in behalf
of Bourbon's boys.
BOURBON MAN MAKES BIG CAT
TLE DEAL
(Danyille Advocate)
One of the largest deals that has
been consummated in Boyle county
for several months was the sale by
Mr. Jere C. Caldwell of this city,
to Mr. W. A. Thomason, of Bour
bon county, one hundred and fifty
seven heavy, fat cattle, which were
delivered recently. The price paid
for this splendid bunch of classy
beeves was 10 cents per pound. The
bunch averaged a little the rise of
one thousand and five pounds and
is said to be one of the finest lot
of Boyle County for the past sev
eral years. The cattle brought up
wards of $23,000.
GOOD OYSTERS
We have a shipment every day
stewing size and New York Counts.
C. P. COOK & CO.
"THE PRIDE OF PARIS"
A SPECIAL GROUPING
FOR
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
DRESSES
IN SILK AND WOOL
GROUPED IN THREE LOTS
AT
$25.00 - $29.50 - $35.00
SPECIAL REDUCTIONS
TUESDAY "WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
ON
FINE
MILLINERY
SPECIAL GROUPING
$7.50 - $10.00 - $12.50
?g
Bcopp
li
DEPARTMENT STORE
PARIS,
I
CAPT. WM. COLLINS APPOINTED
CHIEF
Wm. Collins, eon of the late
John T. Collins, of Paris, has been
chosen head of the field service di
vision of the Burley Tobacco Grow
ers' Co-operative Association, ac
cording to announcement made by
the Burley Tobacco Association offi
cers coincidentally with the state
ment that since Mr. Collins took
charge of the field service more than
21,000 members has been added to
the association.
The total membership, so far as
reported, with a number of counties
out, is 76,531, and Chief Collins
said it was likely that when all the
contracts are in the membership
will be more than 77,000.
James A. Kehoe, of Maysville, and
his staff of workers reported 574
contracts and Mr. Kehoe wrote that
he knew of at least 20 more not
yet in and that he had set the mark
at 600 additional for his territory,
which includes Eastern Kentucky
and Southwestern Ohio. The West
Virginia and Eastern Ohio territory
reported 60 additions, Laurel coun
ty 100, Washington 25, Hardin 50,
Boyle 10, Anderson 30, Indiana
200, Marion county 50, Rockcas
tle 20, Adair county 75 and Nel
son 50.
Mr. Collins' appointment is a rec
ognition of his effective work as
head of the field service division
since Joseph Passonneau gave up
the office to direct the organization
of the dark tobacco growers' asso
ciation. Reports from Glasgow, where the
auction market opened last week,
were that 21,423 pounds of burley
were sold at an average of $28.10 a
hundred. Compared with 100,000
pounds at the opening sale last
year at an average of $36 a hun
dred, or $7.90 a hundred lower than
last year. The quality of the to
bacco sold was said to be high.
TO TURKEY RAISERS
WE WILL BE BUYERS OF
TURKEYS THIS SEASON AND
WILL BEGIN RECEIVING AT OUR
FLOUR MILL AND HEMP HOUSE
ON SOUTH MAIN STREET ALSO
AT OUR OFFICE BUILDING ON
THIRD AND PLEASANT, MON
DAY. THE 13 OF NOVEMBER.
WE WILL PAY THE HIGHEST
MARKET PRICE.
E. F. SPEARS & SONS.
(nov7-tf)
-
KENTUCKY
BOURBON COUNTY CELEBATES
ARMISTICE DAY
The most elaborate Armistice Day
exercises since the close of the
great world war were held in Paris
Saturday morning on the occasion
of the dedication of the Bourbon
County Memorial Building, and he
unveiling of the bronze tablet in
honor of those who lost their lives
in their country's service during
the war.
The hundreds of persons who wit
nessed the services began to arrive
from every section of the county
early Saturday morning. Clear
skies, a smiling sun and almost
summer weather combined to make
the day an ideal one. The business
houses and a large number of resi
dences were decorated with bunt
ing and flags.
The parade, which started from
Seventh street entrance of the Paris
High School building and marched
to the open area provided between
the court house and the Memorial
Building, was composed of the fol
lowing: Detachment of Paris po
lice in new uniforms; fire depart
ment motor apparatus; Pageant of
Paris High School pupils, under
supervision of Miss Reba Lockhart;
Erschberger's Band of Cincinnati;
Bourbon County War Mothers, in
autos; Millersburg Military Insti
tute Cadets, forty-six, in uniform;
By-The-Wayside History Club of P.
H. S., garbed in historical cos
tumes; Bourbon Post and visiting
members of American Legion posts,
four hundred children from Junior
Department of Paris City Schools;
Bourbon County Boy Scouts, under
Scoutmaster F. A. Scott; two floats,
representing "The New Declaration
of Independence." and the "Com
munity Service Playgrounds;" City
'officials in autos.
At the beginning of the program
Chairman James M. Caldwell intro
duced Rev. O. B. Crockett, pastor of
the Paris Methodist church, who
delivered the invocation. Led by
Erschberger's Band the hundreds
of school children sang the national
'anthem, during which the colors
were raised on the flag pole over
the Memorial Building, with appro
priate military ceremonies.
Chairman Caldwell instroudced
Rev. Father "William O'Hare, pastor
of the Church of The Annunciation,
who, in a short and eloquent ad
dress, intrqduced the speaker of
the day, W. C. G. Hobbs, of Lex
ington, who he called "an eminent
American citizen." Mr. Hobbs .de
livered an eloquent and forceful ad
dress, paying a high compliment to
the Bourbon county boys and the
women of Bourbon county who
served during the war. and especi
ally to those twenty-two boys whose
places were vacant in their homes
when the war closed.
At the close of Mr. Hobbs' ad
dress, and during the singing of
the national anthem by the school
children, the bronze tablet set in
'the Broadway side of the Memo
rial Building, containing the names
of the Bourbon county heroes, who
made the supreme sacrifice, was
-Unveiled, little Miss Nancy Crock
ett, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. O.
B. Crockett, drawing aside the
large American flag which had cov
ered it. Underneath the tablet had
been placed a large laurel wreath,
tied with a large red, white and
blue bow, placed there by Rev. T. S.
Smylie Commandant of the Ameri
can Legion, as a tribute from the
living to the dead. The tablet, des
igned and executed by Tiffany Com
pany, of New York, bore the fol
lowing inscription:
"This Building is Dedicated to
The Men of Bourbon Countuy
Who Served Their Country
During The World War
1917-1918
Sacred To The Memory
Of Those Who Died For
Liberty, Justice and Peace.
Charles Adair,
Joseph H. Holt,
Bishop Batterton,
William A. Huddleston,
John Blythe.
Reuben Brent Hutchchraft, Jr.
Charles C. Butler,
Raymond Leslie Link,
James E. Cain,
James Mahorney,
Miller Casey,
James Weaver Neal,
Harry H. Chinn,
Keller B. Ssborne,
r Harry H . Cunningham,
Strother Pruitt,
Elgin Dalzell,
Rqbert M. Rice,
Clemmie Dunnigen.
Luther Carl Shanks,
James Fuller,
William Vice.
Greater Love Hath No Man
Than This: That a Man Lay Down
His Life For His Friends."
The exercises closed with the
benediction pronounced by Rev.
Walter S. Cain, rector of St. Peter's
Episcopal church.
At noon lunch was served to
members of the American "Legion
in the dinner room of the Memorial
BOURBON CIRCUIT COURT
The November term of the Bour
bon Circuit Court was called at ten
o'clock yesterday morning, " with
Special Judge James C. Dedman, of
(Cynthiana, presiding in place of
Judge Robert L. Stout, who is in
California for the winter. The
(Commonwealt was represented by
Commonwealth's Attorney Victor
Bradley and County Attorney D. D.
unne.
Through a misunderstanding
Judge J. E. Childers, of Pikeville,
arrived in Paris yesterday morning
prepared to preside at the Novem
ber term of Bourbon Circuit Court.
Judge Childers returned to Pike
ville, after being advised that Gov
ernor Morrow had assigned Judge
Dedman to preside here.
I After swearing in the Sheriff, M.
Peale Collier, and his deputies, the
Grand Jury was empaneled and
sworn in, as follows: B. M. Ren
ick, foreman; A. L. Burley, L. M.
Vanhook, James Shea. H. W. Purdy,
John K. Cahal, J. T. Jefferson, I. F.
McPheeters, D. P. Jones, W T. Lin-
ville, Houston Crouch and C. P.
Cook.
Judge Dedman delivered his
charge to the Grand Jury in a short
statement. He said that in these
times it wes getting to the point
where a grand jury was almost su
perfluous. He stated that like all
other counties in the State, Bourbon
had its percentage of law violations
and that the grand jury knew what
they were, and should take proper
action on all cases presented for
their consderation. He compli
mented the court officials, the coun
ty and city oilieials in their manner
of upholding the law dnd stated
that he had always heard Bourbon
county had the best set of officials
of any in the State. Referring to
the illicit liquor traffic he urged
the grand jury to promptly investi
gate all such infractions of the
.law, and do their duty in that par
ticular respect. He stafed that
moonshining, once thought to be
the especial privilege and occupa
tion in the mountain secens. had
I now invade 1 the B'.niass and
seemed to be flourishing, in hpt3 or
(all efforts te radicate it. He com
plimented the officials on what they
had done, and arged them to use
i every effort to suppress the traffic
and convict those engaged in it. He
gave the usual charge rfl?ardiiur In
vestigation cf all forms of lav vio
lation, and told ' the jurv that as
they were men of fire intelligence
they would know jus whar to do
without being :nld.
j After the charge to the grand
jury and disposing of some minor
t business the Court adjourned until
! this morning at nine o'clock, the
grand jury remaining in session.
o
CHILDREN'S COATS
CHILDREN'S COATS
LEADER. PARIS, KY.
AT THE
WOMAN SHOOTS MAN NEAR
SHAWHAN
Near Shawhan, Sunday after
noon, during an altercation between
j two men, named Wigglesworth and
Barnett, Wm. Farmer, section boss
on the Louisville and Nashville, en
deavored to act as peacemaker, and
got between the men endeavoring
to separate them.
While thus engaged a woman ran
to Mrs. Farmer, who resided near
by, and tol'1 '"r that the men were
fighting her husband. Mrs. Farmer
secured her revolver, and going to
the scene, fired one shot, taking ef
fect in Wiggleworth's left arm,
passing through into his left side.
Mrs. Farmer stated that she became
excited, and under the impression
that her husband was being
roughly treated, was taking his
part.
Mrs. Farmer was placed under
arrest by Sheriff M. Peale Collier j
ajid Deputy Sheriff James Gibson, j
and brought to Paris, where she!
was placed under a nominal bond, ,
signed by Jos. Farmer, of Paris, and
released from custody. It was al
leged that the men were intoxi
cated.
A bottle of moonshine was al
leged to have been found hidden in
a chicken house at the Farmer
home. Farmer was recognized for
his appearance before County Judge
George Batterton in the County
Court.
There is a big and vital differ
ence between the man who can't get
mad, and the man who won't.
Building, which was beautifully
decorated. The dinner was served
by a committee of Bourbon County
War Mothers. Nicely arranged in
a show case in the front hall of the
.Memorial Building was a collection
'gathered overseas by Dr. E. M. Orr.
All the clubs embraced in the
Bourbon County Federation of Wo
men's Clubs took a prominent part
in the proceedings, and were among
those whose services were useful in
the serving of the lunch at the
Memorial Building.
WAR MOTHERS PLAN AID FOR
EX-SOLDIERS
Mrs. James Douglas, Bourbon
County War Mother, Mrs. Louis
Wollstein, Bourbon County Chapter
Secretary, . and Mrs. Lojuis Rogers,
chairman of the Finance Commit
tee, attended the meeting of the
Kentucky War Mothers, held in
Lexington, at which representatives
from all Chapters of the State were
present. The meetings were held
in the Phoenix Hotel parlors, with
Mrs. John Graham Johns, of Win
chester, State War Mother, presid
ing. Those present far the meet
ing were: Mrs. James Douglas,
Bourbon county war mother; Mrs.
L. Wollstein. Bourbon county chap
ter secretary; Mrs. Virgil McClure,
State chapter secretary; Mrs. Peter
Campbell, Louisville, State chapter
corresponding secretary; Mrs. John
Herring, Georgetown, State second
vice war mother; Mrs. J. C. Dary,
Clark county war mother; Mrs.
John Arnold, Winchester, Clark
county "chapter secretary; Mrs. Wm.
Dowell Oldham, State recording sec
retary. Reports from various chapters
showed especially active work. The
Jefferson county chapter raised $3,
111.81; Clark county, $70, and
Montgomery county, ?90.
Mrs. Gus L. Heyman was elected
chairman of the Ways and Means
Committee, and Mrs. William
Dowell Oldham, national legislative
chairman, was elected State legisla
tive chairman and publicity mana
ger; Mrs. Alice Walcutt, of Frank
fort, was elected chairman of fu
ture work; Mrs. John Herring,
chairman of history and research,
and Mrs. Louis Rogers, of Paris,
chairman of finance.
Each chairman will select her own
committee, and other chairmen will
be elected at the meeting to be held
the first Monday in December.
Mrs. Reuben Hutchcraft, advisory
war mother, is chairman of the flag
committee, the, State Executive
Board as a body being the commit
tee members.
Regrets were expressed because
of the continued illness of Mrs. ,
Hutchcraft. 1
The hospitalization of men in-!
jured in service, endorsement of ad
justed compensation for former ser
vice, men, just compensation board, '
release of prisoners convicted for all
except heinous offenses committed
during service in the world war,
army and navy be put on same basis
S
?
-SN-
Krr'-SM &'-? -H-jVr?---i"t3
f ami I v "vv
i. iiwK SI
At $8 Xjcivfeiwr" i" j -
1 ta - 7h
25 REDUCTION
ON
ANY HAT IN OUR STOCK
INCLUDING TRIMMED, STREET
AND SPORT HATS
EXTRA SPECIAL SALE
OF
Fleur de Lis and
$5.00 $7.50 $9.75
KRANK&CO.
LADIES' OUTFITTERS
MRS. OFFUTT'S WILL PROBAH
In the County Court Friday, tkp
last will and testament of the lata VN
Mrs. Jasper Offutt, who died at kr
home on the Lexington road, near
near Paris, last week, was probate
by County Judge George Battertom.
By the terms of the document, Mrs.
Offutt left the sum of $3,000 to tie
Paris Presbyterian church, and, 1
000 to its pastor, Rev. T. S. Smylie,
and $1,000 to James Wheeler, a
colored servant, who had bee a
faithful member of her household
for many years.
Other beneficiaries are her heirs,
who will get the rest of her prop
erty when all bequests are paI4.
They are Miss Julia A. Wilson, of
Dallas, Texas; Julian C. Wasson, oC
Watsonville, Cali.; Mrs. Margaret
C. Madera, Varsailles; Mrs. Gea.
Dunlap. Lexington; Mrs. Addie H.
Childers, Versailles; Mrs. James
Wilmott, Lexington; Miss Margaret
Wilson McLeod, Bourbon county;
Miss Louise Warford, and Mrs. I."
B. Conway, Calif.; Miss Sue John
son, Paris; Miss -, Jennie Whitting
ton and Mrs. Dr. Posey, Frankfort.
Mrs. Offutt diActed that Miss
Julia A. Wilson. Mrs. Madera and
Mrs. Dunlap shall share equally in
the residue of the estate with her
heirs, and that her personal ef
fects be divided by Mrs Jacob
Jacoby, Mrs. Dunlap and Mrs. Ma
dera. The Bourbon-Agricultural Bank
& Trust Company, of Paris, wa
appointed executor of the estate, the
trust being accepted and bond fur
nished in the sum of $60,000.
o
DON'T PUT IT OFF
Our line of Christmas Greeting
cards is complete. You can make
your selection now and not be dis
appointed. If you wait until later
the one you want may be sold out.
Come in, we will be glad to show
them. See window display.
THE BOURBON NEWS JOB DE
PARTMENT. as to retirement, United States
army men placed on same basis as
to position of warrant officers as
that conferred on -the drafted army,
establishment of memorials and co
operation with world war veterans
in every possible manner, are the
main features of the work planned-,
by the War Mqthers of Kentucky
and stated in resolutions adopted.
-
Hand Made Blouses
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