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The mountain sentinel. (Ebensburg, Pa.) 1844-1853, November 04, 1852, Image 2

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MDMTAil SENTINEL.
" Andrew J. Rhey, Editor.
EBENSBURG, PA.
Thursday, November a, 1C58.
The Result of the Election.
The success of our party in the Union is in
deed gratifying. Frank. Pierce and William
R. King are elected by immense majorities.
The result needs no comment. The figures
speak in thunder tones against the whig party.
We have carried the camp of the enemy by
storm, from Maine to California, and the judg
ment of the people is strongly in favor of the
men and measures of the Democratic Party.
The Democracy of the entire country have nobly
fought and nobly won a great victory. The gal
lant Democracy of Cambria did their duty like
true and faithful soldiers in the democratic
ranks. The result here is a glorious one and
is deserving of the highest praise. Once more
we have a Democratic President a man who
will discharge the duties of his office with credit
to himself and honor to his country.
CAMBRIA COIXTY ELECTIOX.
Pierce.
Allegheny,
Blacklick,
Cambria,
Conemaugfi,
Clearfield,
Carroll,
Conemaugfi bor.
Ebensburg,
Jackson,
Johnstown
Loretto.
Richland,
Summerhill,
Susquehanna,
Washington,
White,
40 maj.
70
33
75
43
0
180
35
34U
it
Scott.
12 maj.
90
33
32
12
58
21
DEMOCRATIC SONG.
Aib "Old Folks at Home."
Way down upon the old Salt River,
Far far away, - ,
There's where the whigs are fixed forever,
There's where they're doomed to stay.
All up and down its whole extension
Sadly they roam,
Still groaning that the late election
Sent them from the White House at home.
Chorcs All the whigs are sad and dreary,
Every where they roam, I weary,
Singing Brothers, how my heart grows
Far from the White House at nome.
All round the White House we have wandered
(Thus do they rave,)
Many a dollar for votes have we sqandered,
Many an office we gave.
Then when we were a cheerful giver,"
Fillmore was their cry,
Now they've rowed us up Salt River,
There to politically die.
Chorus All the whigs, &c.
One little spot is all that's left us,
Where we now stay !
Of all our pickings they bereft us,
Then seut us far away.
When shall we have again our places,
Live on the public comb,
When shall we dare to show our faces
Down at the White House at home.
Chorcs All the whigs, &c.
851
264
264
587 maj. for Pierce.
That will do quite well we think, for
the county which was to vote for Scott,
according to the following letter written to
the Chambersburg Charger, a whig pa
per Ebexsbcbg, (Pa.,)July, 22, 1852.
Stover $ XlcClurc: Just no certain as fate will
Cambria vote for Gen. Scott, and Locofoco
Armstrong wid go with us. Look out for Western
Pennsylvania next fall. The campfires are bright
and the 44 copies of The Charger which we get
here, are helping gloriously to roll on the ball.
P.
A few more copies of the Charger and Cam
bria would have given 1000! !
PIERCE LEADS THE COLUMN!
DEMOCRACY TRIUMPHANT ! !
FRANK. PIERCE and WILLIAM E. KING,
Elected President and Vice President of
the United States, by an overwhel
ms ming majority, receiving the Elec
toral Vote of nearly all the
States ! ! The Whig par
ty routed, Horse, Foot,
and Dragoons ! ! !
The returns of the election indicate that the
following States have gone for PIERCE and
KING by large majorities.
PENNSYLVANIA BY 2-5,000.
.EW TOKK 15 Y 15,COO.
OHIO BY 15,000.
MAINE.
NEW HAMPSHIRE.
RHODE ISLAND.
CONNECTICUT.
NEW JERSEY.
DELAWARE.
MARYLAND.
VIRGINIA.
INDIANA.
ILLINOIS.
MICHIGAN.
MISSOURI.
ALABAMA:
GEORGIA.
"WISCONSIN.
Gen. SCOTT has the vote of VERMONT,
MASSACHUSETTS, KENTUCKY and TEN
NESSEE, and probably North Carolina.
ONE THOUSAND CHEERS.
"Bring lu tUe Apples !"
The apple may be called the "staple fruit" of
New England. It ranks among fruits as the po
tato among vegetables. A writer iu the last
number of the Knickerbocker, says : "The ap
ple is the companion of the winter evenings,
associated with a cheerful room, a bright fire,
a pleasing tale, Scott's novels or the Arabian
Nights. Perhaps it is nearly bedtime. Your
eyes grow dim," You aro ; fatigued with 6tudy,
with chess, with checkers, with books ; you
sigh, you yawn, you stretch your arms abov
your head. All of a sudden a thought strikes
you. Bnnq in th nppl's'. It is UKe tnagic. !
TliH foot light go up and the scene
A Miser' Legacy.
The Queen of England recently received a be
quest of a half a million sterling from one of her
deceased subjects, a Mr. Nield. The New York
Post thus condenses the story :
Nield was a barrister at law, and died in
Chelse, aged 72 years. He was possessed of an
immense fortune, but was of very eccentric and
penurious habits. At the death of his father,
thirty years since, he came into possession of
about 250,000, which sum had not been touch
ed up to the period of his death. The deceased
was never known to wear a great coat. He u
sually dressed in a blue coat, with metal but
tons, which he prohibited being brushed, as it
would take off the nap and deteriorate its value.
He held considerable landed property in Kent
and Bucks, and was always happy to receive an
invitation from his tenantry to visit them, which
he occasionally did, often remaining a month at
a time, and he was thus enabled to add to his
avinis. His appearance and manners led
strangers to imagine that he was in the lowest
verge of penury, and their compassion was ex
cited in his behalf, an instance of which may be
mentioned.
Just before the introduction of the railway
system of travelling, the deceased had been on a
visit to some of his estates, and was returning
to London, when the coach stopped at Farning
ham. With the exception of our miser the pas
sengers all retired to the Inn. Missing their
coach companion and recollecting his decayed
appearance, they conceived he was in distressed
circumstances, and accordingly a sum of money
was subscribed, and a bumping glass of brandy
and water was kindly sent out to the 'poor'
gentleman, which he thankfully accepted. Ma
ny instances of a similar character might be re
lated. A few days before his death the deceas
ed told one of his executors that he had made a
most singular will, but as the property was his
own be had done as he pleased with it. The
executors are the Keeper of the Privy Purse for
the time being, (Dr. Tatten,) and Mr. J. Ste
vens, of Willesborough.
After bequeathing a few trifling legacies, the
deceased has left the whole of his immense for
tune to "Her Most Gracious Majesty Queen
Victoria, begging Her Majesty's most gracious
acceptance of the same, for her sole use and
benefit, of her heirs, &c." The property is es
timated at upwards 01 Jtouu.uuu. tor some
years before his death, Mr. Nield scarcely al
lowed himself the common necessaries and com
forts of life, and has left a poor old housekeep
er, who was with him more than twenty six
years, without the smallest provision or ack
nowledgement for her protracted and far from
agreeable or remunerative services.
The Queen has refused to accept the gift.
Tribute to Gen. Washington at Dublin
1 heatre.
Mr Hacket, the actor, gave the following ac
count of an occurrence at the Dublin Theatre:
"The first night of ltip Van Winkle, when in
the midst of the scene where he finds himself
lost in an amazement at the change of his native
village, as well as himself, and everybody he
meets, a person of whom he is making inquiry
mentions the name of Washington. Rip asks
'Who is he ?' The other replies, 'What ! did
you never hear of the name of the immortal
Geo. Washington, the father of his country ?'-
The whole audience from pit to gallery, seemed
to rise, and shouting, huzzaing, clapping of
hands, and stamping of feet, made the very
building shake. The deafning plaudits contin
ued some time, and wound up with three dis
tinct rounds. To attempt to describe to you my
feelings during such an unexpected thundergust
of national enthusiasm is utterly impossible. I
choked the tears gushed from my eyes, and I
can assure you, it was by a great effort that I
restrained myself from destroying all the allu
sion of the scene, by breaking the fetters with
which the age and character of Hip had invest
ed me, and exclaiming in the fullness of my
heart, 'God bless old Ireland!'
Important ArrestClay Medal Probably
Found.
A despatch from . Baltimore states that the
Hanoverian Consul at that place has received in
formation of the arrest in Hanover of a man
named Frederick Nolecke, reeently returned
from this country, and having in his possession
2000 in American gold, a large gold medal,
and a quantity of valuable jewelry, the manner
of acquiring which he would give no satisfacto
ry account of. He was an old convict in Hano
ver, and whilst in this country was arrested
several times. He resided principally in Phila
delphia and Baltimore.
It is thought he may have been concerned in
the Portsmouth (Va.) Bank robbery, and that
. . j-thc medal in his possession may be the cclebra-
j t'd Clov medal stolen iu New York.
Interesting Letter.
In the Shasta, (California) Courier, of Sep
tember 18, a copy of which paper has been sent
to us by a friend, we find the following letter
addressed to His Excellency, John Bigler, Gov
ernor of California. The many friend of Lieut.
McDermit will be pleased to learn that he is dis
charging his duties as Sheriff of Siskiyou coun
ty in that State, with remarkable ability and fi
delity. Ybf.ka, Sept. 7th, 1852.
To Ifis Excellency, John JJiyler, Governor of the
Stale of California :
Dear Sin : A few weeks since a party of
about fifteen men under command of Charles
McDermit, the Sheriff of this county, started out
for the purpose of affording aid and succor to
the immigration, and to protect them against the
attacks of the Indians in the Northeastern sec
tion of this county. On their way to the foot of
the Sierra Nevada, about 110 miles from this
place they fell in with a pack train consisting of
nine men, eight of whom were armetTand who
they thought would come through with safety,
as there was a large wagon train in charge of
two of McDermit's party a day or two ahead of
them. They continued their journey;jfor the
purpose of affording assistance to a number of
families who were said to be in the rear. Not
long after leaving these men, they were attack
ed by the Indians, and eight out of the nine
were killed. The man who escaped succeeded
in joining the wagon train ahead of him, one
night before they arrived at this place. McDer
mit left two or three men witb. each train he
passed to serve as guides, and to afford such
protection as lay within their power.
As soon as we were informed of the murder
of the eight men alluded to, the citizens fitted
out an expedition consisting of thirty-two men
including eight Shasta Indians, under the com.
mand of Captain Ben. Wright.
Yesterday McDermit returned and brought us
intelligence of a sad and alarming character.
Thos. H. Coates, Esq., late of the assembly of
Paliffimift- Tfr. Tnntr nml Afr. Oironshv tarn
our citizens, who had been left by McDermit in
charge of a train of wagons, and an immigrant
bolonging to the train named Felix Martin, were
all murdered while about a mile in advance of
the train. The first intimation the main body
of emigrants had of their death was a shower
of arrows from the Indians just as they arrived
at the scene of murder. They immediately cor
ralled their stock, placed themselves in a defen
sive attitude,and succeeded in beating off the In
dians for a day and a half, during which time
they were without water. At this juncture
Capt. Wright and his party made their appear
ance, and after reconnoitering, made a vigorous
charge upon a body of 200 Indians, and drove
them into a lake, killing about thirty. They
fought in water over waist deep. Whenever
they fired into a canoe the Indians, men, women
and children jumped into the lake, and they
think a number must have been drowned. In
this engagement Capt. Wright and his Ptxty in
cluding his Indians, acted with distinguished
courage and are entitled to the highest praise.
He made a requisition upon us for provisions,
ammunition and men, which was promptly re
sponded to. A wagon load of provisions left
here yesterday fifteen or twenty men will leave
here to-day,
Up to this time we have contributed 837 in
money, besides furnishing provisions and mules,
and not including the outfit of McDermit and
his party. i
Eleven men, whose names are unknown, have
been buried by McDermit and Wright and from
the quantity of apparel belenging to females and
children found in possession of the Indians, we
are seriously apprehensive that manyother per
sons have been killed.
The Indians living on the head waters of the
Sacramento River, and those living between
Goose Lake and the Dalles, on the Columbia Ri
ver, seem to be concentrating about Goose Lake,
in this county, on the emigrant trail, for the
purpose of murder and plunder.
Can you do nothing for the innocent victims
of Indian barbarity ? Is our country a "a terra
incognita," entitled to no consideration no pro
tection w hatever from either State or General
Government?
You will see that our citizens, in public meet
ing assembled, have resolved not to pay the
State Taxes, nor to permit the County Treasurer
to pay over what he now has in his possession,
until they receive some protection. I depreci
ate any kind of opposition to the laws of our
State, but I really cannot blame them for this
determination. It is not the first instance in
the history of Government, where the people
have refused to be taxed because they did not
receive some corresponding benefit and they in
this case not only say they will not pay Jhe State
Taxes, but they possess the ability and courage
to enforce what they say. Cannot a conflict be
tween our people and our officers be avoided
in some way ?
I wrote to your Excellency for arms an d am
munition. I am informed that yon requested
Gen. Hitchcock to send them up. This is al
that I have heard of either my letter or the
arms. .
We are informed here that not less than three
hundred stand of superior . Mississippi Rifles,
belonging to the State, are now in the posses
sion of the volunteer companies of San Francis
co and Sacramento, doubtless doing the State
much service in instructing the young gentlemen
of our cities in the mysteries of the manual ex
ercise. Painted sticks would answer them as
good a purpose, and by sending us the arms they
would be devoted to a eood practical use. If
we can't get troops, give us arms and ammuni
tion.
Do not think that the numbers, strength, or
bravery of these Indians are overrated. They
are indeed, very, very numerous.
Yours, with respectful consideration,
Speech ofP. C. Shannon Esq.
In the Pittsburg Daily Union, of Monday
November 1st, we find the following concluding
remarks of the speech of P. C. Shannon, Esq.,
made at Ebensburg, on Thursday last. The
language is eloquent and beautiful beyond des
cription, and we commend it to the careful per
usal of every citizen in Cambria.
"Men of Cambria ! what though you live nn
der a chilling sky and a severe climate ? What
though your sun is oftentimes obscured by robes
of mountain mist? In some respects, you are
far better and happier than the dwellers in the
valleys. The very air you breathe invigorates,
refreshes and strengthens.
There is a beautiful flower, which, refusing
to open'under the genial light and warmth of
the sun, blooms only in the shades and dark
ness of night the glorious night-blooming Cer-
eus. And so, as the history of mankind attests,
the precious flower of freedom blooms the brigh
test and the best beneath the frowning skies and
amidst the snow-drifts of the mountain regions
Look at the past and let it answer. Look at the
deeds of valor that occurred in the mountain
passes of the Tyrol, and in brave old Switzer-
land. What spirit was it that nerved the stout
arm of William Tell to break down the tyranny
which yoked the liberties of his country to the
bloody car of despotism ? That manly and free
born couraee still animates his descendants. It
survives, out of the shock of revolutions and the
crash of empires, to guard and preserve the na
tionality of Switzerland, whilst the sunny plains
and fertile valleys watered by the Po and the
Arno are fast locked in the iron fetters of sla
very.
Glancing across the broad page of history,
let us pause under the shadows of lofty Ben
Lomond, or upon the wild crags of Ben Nevis,
and call to recollection the heroic deeds and
chivalrous actions of Wallace and Bruce, in at
testation of the fact, that, in the ages gone by,
Freedom always found her surest and truest
abiding-place in a mountain home, by the fount
of the rock and amid the noise of the misty
stream. This truth is also beautifully and ap
propriately recognized by the emblem on our
flag for where has- the Eagle his home?
"The eagle and the stork
On cliffs and cedar tops their eyries build."
Around me I see many whose fathers, flying
from the banks of the Severn and the Conway,
to avoid the stranger's harsh rule, came at an
early day to the pine forests and awful soli
tudes of the Allegheniesr in pursuit of the free
dom denied to them at home. They brought
with them the old language and the ancient tra
ditions of their country, which are still preser
ved around your firesides and in your temples.
Yon deserted village, Beula, with its lonely and
mouldering grave-yard, forms a touching and
melancholy episode in the history of this Coun
ty. The hawthorn still flourishes by the bank
of the stream, and trees are growing by the old
hearth-stone. The seats of your fathers are de
serted; the roofs have all fallen in. But tell me
vreisnnien, -what spirit was it, that, on5nowdon
and Cader Idris, in times long gone by, urged
your fathers, the descendants of the ancient
Britons, to resist the destroying sword of the
Saxon, until the mountain streams ran red with
blood?
The love of liberty and sturdy independence
are the great characteristics of the mountain
eer. "An iron race the mountain cliffs maintain ;
For where unwearied sinews must be found,
With side-long plough to quell the flinty ground;
To turn the torrent's swift descending flood ;
To tame the savage rushing from the wood,
What wonder if, to patient valor train'd,
They guard with spirit what by strength they
gain'd.
And so their rocky ramparts round they see.
The rough abode of toil and liberty."
Bravery and Democracy here, indeed, sit en
throned on the hearts of the people a bravery
that yields not to the bravado of foreign foes,
and a Democracy which swerves not from the
line of principles. When recently the rights of
our country were invaded by an insulting foe,
and the trumpet of war sounded throughout the
land, the men of Cambria answered to the call
as quickly and cheerfully as the followers of
Roderick Dhu, in Clan-Alpine's glen, responded
to the shrill whistle of their chieftain. j
And in the last political contest, although low
and insulting appeals were made to induce you
to desert the candidates of your party, and
those principles of governmental policy for
which you have so often battled, yet you prompt
ly rejected the sophistical allurements of whig
gery, and most nobly sustained the cause of
Democracy. All honor to Cambria county !
All praise to her well-tried and generous Dem-
The Colony ot KorwegUni.
The following extracts describing Old Bull s
reception at his colony of Norwegians, in Potter
Co., Pa., are taken from a letter to the New
York Courier, written by a gentleman who ac
companied 01 e Bull from New York.
"The immigrants had arrived before us, aud
supposing that was the end of their journey,
had prepared to pitch their tents, and had rais
ed their flag, which they made before leaving
New York. It was a beautiful device. The
Cross of Xorvcau in the centre, surrounded by the
Stars and Stripes of t he United States. As soon
as Ole Bull appeared in Bight, the immigrants
commenced the most enthusiastic cheering,
which we answered by standing up in our wag
ons, waiving our handkerchiefs and swinging
our hats. Ole Bull ceuld not wait for the slow
motion of the horses, but leaped from the wag
on, and ran to embrace them. Such enthusiasm
and manifestations of delight are seldom wit
nessed. After the first greetings were over,
Mr. Bull addressed them, saying that after hav
ing spent many months in examining different
sections of the United States, he had at length
found a place where his loved Norwegians could
have a home, where the climate was as health
ful as their own Norway, the soil capable of
supplying all their wants, and where they could
enjoy perfect liberty, protected by wise and
wholesome laws, which would guarantee to them
every right and privilege, so long as they re
mained good citizens. With tears in their eyes' Huntingdon,
muiana,
Jefferson,
OFFICIAL VOTE maj.
At last, have we been able to cbt;n .L
plete official vote of the State.
Sup. Judge.
COVNTlEf.
Adams,
Allegheny,
Armstrong,
Beaver,
Bedford,
Berks,
Blair,
Bradford,
Bucks,
Butler,
Cambria,
Carbon,
Centre,
Cheater,
Clarion,
Clearfield,
Clinton,
Columbia,
Crawford,
Cumberland,
Dauphin,
Delaware,
Elk,
Erie,
Fayette,
Franklin,
Fulton,
Greene,
W. A. Robertson.
cfL A laboring man, who worked on the Sec.
of McKiernan & Given, Central Railroad, na
med Helsel, while walking down Piane No. 2.
A. P. R. R. on Tuesday evening, was runover
by the cars and killed.
ocracv
But another contest approaches. A still
greater effort must be made. Let the victory
of the 12th of October be considered merely as
the prelude to the grand, national tragedy of
next Tuesday, in which Whiggery must again
act the p . t of the vanquished. Let every Dem
ocrat consider it an act of solemn duty to be
present at the polls upon that day. And in
conclusion, let us all remember the words of the
immortal Jackson (Let us fct ocb. shoulders
TO THE WHEEL, Pit AY TO GoD FOB STBEKGTH, AND
PUSH ON THE COLl'MN.)
A Lucky Presentiment.
A correspondent of the Alexandria Gazette,
speaking of a late visit to England says :
"I had gone to Gravesend with the view of ta
king passage, but an incident prevented. A
white swan, worthy to perform his flight through
the Milky way, came near the vessel in which it
was my design to sail, and her commander took
his gun. The sequel we need not . mention.
The blood of the dead bird stained the river.
We had just been fresh from reading the Ancient
Mariner, in which the vessel encountered heavy
calamities after the killing of an albatross, and.
the circumstance determined me not to go with
such a barbarian. You will smile at my super
stition, you may even go through Lausanne and
tell the incident, but don't forget to add that
the vessel from whose deck the bird was shot
has been missing from that time. She perished
with all on board."
they answered him with shouts and embracings.
As a flag staff was needed, a beautiful straight
evergreen was cut down, which the Norweigians
trimmed, leaving the topmost branches as an or
nament to the flag 6taff. This they raised from
the top of the Hotel ; as soon as it was elevated
and fastened, a large flock of birds came and
perched upon it, and commenced singing in the
gayest and most delightful manner. It appear
ed as though they were inspired by the scene,
and welcome to the great Norwegian and his
followers. Regarding it as a good omen, we all
united in giving the birds a hearty round of ap
plause. It had been arranged that the new name by
which the town was hereafter to be known,
should be pronounced as soon as the flag had
reached its proper elevation. The cords for
raising the flag were now adjusted, and all wai
ted to hear the chosen home. The flag ascended
slowlj- and gracefully to its place, a gentle
breeze floated it proudly in midair; and the
name of Oleoxa was given to the new home of
the Norwegians. Thirty -one cheers (one for
each state) were given, and three more for Ole
Bull.
In the evening, there was a grand celebration
in honor of the foundling of the town. Bonfires
were lighted in every direction. Ole Bull made
a speech to his countrymen, in which, after al
luding, in eloquent terms to the original discov
ery of this countrymen not to disappoint the
confidence of the Americans ; "but by lives of
industry and honesty, to show to their new
brothers that they have not misplaced their
friendship. TLc writer adds:
"Hie emotion with which this speech was re
ceived (of which the above is but a faint outline)
cannot be described ; the Norwegains, with bare
eads and hands raised to heaven, swore they
would obey the laws of the country, and do their
utmost to be worthy of their protection. After
silence was restored, Old Bull then took his vio
lin and commenced an anthem suitable to the oc
casion. No lanjniace can describe this music
the audience the attendant circumstances, and
the occasion, appeared to have given a new and
unearthly inspiration to the great artist ; he
touched every chord of every heart in his audi
ence. At times the Norwegains wept like chil
dren, as the strains reminded them of kindred
and friends far beyond the ocean, and then the
strains of liberty would pour forth from the en
chanted instrument. In a moment, understan
ding the language of the music, they would
shout loud huzzas and chant in unison the war
songs and hymns of liberty of old Norway.
"And the sounding aisles of the dim wood rang,
To the ANTHEM OF THE FREE."
"At last the music ceased, and when the em
otion had subsided, a gentleman of Pennsylvan
ia went forward and welcomed 01 e Bull and the
Norwegians to the ancient Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania and to the United States of Amer
ica, and in a few eloquent and well-timed re
marks, promised to them the protection of our
Republican Government and the peaceful enjoy
ment of our free institutions."
Juniata,
Lancaster,
Lawrence,
Lebanon,
Lehigh,
Luzerne,
Lycoming,
McKean,
Mercer,
Mifflin,
Monroe,
Montgomery,
Montour,
Northampton,
Northumberland,
Perry,
Philadelphia city,
" county,
Pike,
Potter,
Schuylkill,
Somerset,
Susquehanna,
Sullivan,
Tioga,
Union,
Venango,
Warren,
Washington,
Wayne,
Westmoreland,
Wyoming,
York,
W
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Woodward,
Buihiigtou,
BECAPITl'LATIOS.
172928
153715
Majority,
Hopkins,
Hoffman,
17154'.)
151951
Majority,
19205
Later from California.
ARRIVAL OF THE GEORGIA'
19593
Eloptmcut and Detertlon.
About a month ago, a young man of prepos
sessing appearance and fortified with strong let
ters of recommendation to respectable parties in
this city, arrived here from the East, and made
arrangements with a view of engaging in mer
cantile pursuits. He formed a number of ac
quaintances, and soon became intimate at the
house of a worthy citizen, whose residence is in
one of the upper Wards. The latter has been
married only a few months previous to a beau
tiful girl of 17, with whom he seemed to live
happily. The stranger, by his insinuating ad
dress, succeeded in corrupting her, and gained
her consent to elope with him. The party took
passage on the steamer Herald, on the 6th inst.,
and proceeded on that boat to Cincinnati. Up
on arriving at that place, the faithless woman
discovered that Mr. Gibson (the name of her
deceiver,) was a worthless character, and only
known in the Queen City to the police and the
keeper of the minor gambling dens in that lo
cality. Finding that she had been victimized,
and ruined in a double sense, 6he had the
scoundrel arrested for vagrancy, and on the tri
al was the principal witness against him. The
evidence was clear that he was a gambler and
an associate of thieves, but from some unac
countable cause, the ordinance did not embrace
a case like his, and he was discharged. The
woman became repentant and telegraphed her
husband to come and take her home. Gibson at
once left the city, and for several days had not
been heard of by any of the officers. St. Louis
Ti'!.
The U. S. Mail Steamshp Georgia, Lieut. Wm.
Mitchell, Commander, arrived at New York, last
evening, with the California mails to October 1.
Three hundred passengers, and $2,000,000 of
gold on freight, and $300,000 in the hands of pas
sengers. The Georgia left Aspinwall at 4 o'clock
on the morning of the 20th.
The steampship Tennessee arrived at ranam
Oct. 10, with the mails and specie, and was the
only steamer at Panama.
The Winfield Scott was at Tobago, waiting for
engineers before she could proceed on Ler voj
nge. The health on the Isthmus is good ; verj few
cases of fever, and no cholera.
A military force has been organized unJer the
direction of Gen. Paez, which is of great benefit
to passengers crossing the Isthmus. The natives
are not allowed to carry arms of any description.
Gen. Paez aud his officers deserve great ere Jit for
their vigilance and promptness in 6upppresiing
murders and robberies.
The Panama Railroad ij in good order, aaJtL
cars run twice a day to Barbacoa.
Kingston is quite healthy, no epidemic prevail
ing. Oct 24, at 8 A. M., passed steamship Illinois
off the Caicos Islands, at 12 M. passed steamship
Star of the West.
Died on the passage and buried at sea, James
Blakely, aged 49, passenger ; Francis Hunt, 4th
Assistant Engineer, aged 37.
In speaking of the conclusion of the sale of the
city lots advertised by the Commissions of the
funded debt of San Francisco, the JferaM sajs:
"This property has realised to the city $204,000
and the proceeds will suffice, not only to redeem
all the outstanding three percent scrip, but will
be amply sufficient to pay the November interest
on the funded debt, and possibly leave something
to be appropriated to the sinking fund.
The mail steamship Tennessee left San Fran
cisco on the 1st of October, with 435 passengers,
and $2,373,560 in gold dust the largest ship
ment by any one steamer this year.
The news from California possesses but little
general interest.
The papers are freely discussing the subject of
tha Collectorship of San Francisco, trusting that
a citizen of California will now be appointed.
The mining intelligence from every quarter
is of the most cheering character.
The citizens of Marysville are about construc
ting a Railroad from that city to Benicia.
The subject of Col. Fremont's claim in Mari
posa county was argued before the Land Com
missioners on the 16th September.
Serious disturbances continue among
Spanish American population of Calaveros.
Horse thieves have been arrested and summarily
uiecuted.
Dr. McGregor, a native of Scotland, aged 65,
was murdered at Sonora on the 21st September.
He was stabbed by a Spaniard.
The Shasta Cooricrh&s accounts of the renew
al of the Indian outrageg in that section.
Business generally had been dull, and th
markets show little change.
en.
)

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