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Virginian-pilot. (Norfolk, Va.) 1898-1911, January 01, 1899, Image 3

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PORTSMOUTH ADVERTISEMENTS.
Continued.
HOSIERY!
HOSIERY!
The Best 12^3 c, Hosiery in the city. Also a
full line of 2?c, 3?c. and $Qc. qualities.
320 High Street,
In Men's Winter Suits and Overcoats
Wo have.th? largest and choicest stock the market affords, and upon examina?
tion you will admit that our prices are tho lowest when quality is considered.
$13.50 Overcoats for $10.00.
$10.00 Overcoats for $7.60. A bargain.
Buy first-class Clothing in our store and get splendid value.
MERCHANT TAILORING.
Well dressed young men have a decided advantage by having their Suits,
Trousers and Overcoats mado by us. Prices aro ?j'lght. Workmanship, Fit and
?tylo guaranteed.
SHOE PUPAItTMiBNT.-We offer from to-day the greatest values on the
market for examination. Boys' All Solid Shoes at tl.CO.
Lad'.es' Dongola. Pat. I^ither or Tip same. Button and I>aco, all widths, J1.50.
Men's Hand Sewed Shorn, will wear as good as any tf.-.OO Shoo In the State
Wears, Fit and Comfort guaranteed?Our price, $3.50.
THE BRANDT tOMPANY, 213 and 215 High St.
STRICTLY ONE PRICE?FOR CASH ONLY.
Standard Diaries for 1899.
Virginia and North Carolina Almanacs.
ALL FANCY GOODS at GREATLY REDUCED PRICES
ATVDBJK^OiV *Ss THOMPSON.
_ 224- HIGH STREET._
"THE DM OF 1898"
Is with us and we wish our patrons all a
Happy New Year. We extend to every?
one a cordlnl invitation to call and get
one of our beautiful "Flag Calendars for
'89." Our stock of Drugs, Talent Medi?
cines, Toilet Articles Is large and com?
plete and sold at cut rate prices.
JEROME P. CA RR,
WHOLESALE & RETAIL
Cor
DRUGGIST,
Court and County and Green near
Bart streets.
DELICIOUS HOT SODA.
DELICIOUS HOT 60DA.
ALL CHRISTMAS GOODS SOLD
.AT....
HHLF PRICE
Only a few left. Come and see our NEW FUR COLLARETTES.
7?. J. PHILLIPS,
JUVENILE BICYCLES
Large Stock High Grade,
$18 and $20,
Velocipedes, ? $1.50
Tricycles, ? - $4.00
mccftani&ai ana steam Togs.
W. N. WHITE, Portsmouth, Va.
?SIS MM
you will lay In when you nil your bin
now from our high grade and superior
Coal. Without a warm fire to cheer him
once in awhile old Santa Claus would
weary on h s round. Our Coal is well
screened, and will insure you having your
Christmas feast well cooked. Free burn?
ing.
joseph i mm,
WHOLESALE GROCER AND DEALER
IN COAL, FEED AND ICE,
Crawford. Columbia and Water streets.
WE HAVE NOT SAID MUCH ABOUT COAL,
W. & J. PARKER,
COR. CRAWFORD AND COUNTY STREETS,
PORTSMOUTH.
JESSE WHITEHEAD'S SALOON,
511 CRAWFORD STREET.
FREE LUNCH DAILY FROM ELEVEN TO ONE O'CLOCK.
? Everything known to the profssslo n put up In the finest stylo possible.
DrftiRht and Bottled Beer a specialty. An excellent line of Cigars . Ca.) in and
be convinced.
NEW YEAR PRICES,
Corned Hams, Rc. pound; Country Eggs.
21c. dozen; 10c. V?m Camp's Muccaronl
and Cheese. 5c. can: Sauer Kraut, Be.
quart. With each bottle of Borjcs' Pol?
ish for ladies' shoes vye will give a box
of blacking free. Don't forget Bluo Babel
Coffee, the best in tho city. Remember
these, prices are for Saturday from 5
o'clock a. m. to 10 o'clock p. m. Flvo
clerks In attendance. Respectfully, ?
R. E. KING,
S. W. Corner Court and Glasgow Sts.
FOR RENT.
Three-story Warehouse, No. 610 Craw?
ford street; excellent location for a gro?
cery, notion, hardware or commission
house: rent, J35 per month.
JNO. L. WATSON.
309 High street._Portsmouth. Va.
NOTICE !
Something worth knowing l? where to
get the best WOOD und COAL in the city
at th? LOWEST PRICES. Call and see
for yourself and be convinced, or phone to
H. B. WJLKINS,
oc2-tf 1213 WASHINGTON ST. *
BRIGHT OUTLOOK
FOR BUSINESS
Railroad Magnates Talk En?
couragingly for New Year.
IRON INDUSTRY FAIR INDEX
Fnrnaoe? or luo South IKiiiiiIeik Fnll
Cnpnctty?Lnrgo Antounm or tap*
llnl Invested in (ho Induatry?Dl>
Versified i'nriuiugj I* I?r< (liable
tin ju Commissioner llornbecli ?
JEeououilc Conditions Gond.
Baltimore, Md., December 30.?One of
the best indications o? the economic
condition of a community or section is
the railroad situation. The showing
made by the railroads of the South
during the past year is most encour?
aging .for 1S98 has been notable for the
construction of new railroads there,
nearly every State having a record of
considerable new mileage of standacd
guage, the aggregate In the South rep?
resenting fully 1,095 miles. Contracts
have been let, moreover, or construe-.
tion is under way of other railroads to
an equal extent, if not greater than
that of 1898. These facts, significant
though they be, are intensified by the
results of observations of men close to
the every-day operations of the roads.
A short while since the Manufactur?
ers' Record addressed letters to presi?
dents, passenger and freight agents
and others closely identified with the
details of railroad wvirk and eminently
qualified to express Judgment upon the
manifestations. In reply a number of
letters have been received, and ex?
tracts from them are as follows:
THE IRON INDUSTRY.
W. W. Flnley, second vice president
Southern Railway Company., 'Wash?
ington, D. C:
"The Iron Industry is generally con?
sidered a fair index to business. With
its decline business becomes slack;
with its prosperity all other lines of in?
dustry invariably respond promptly.
The fact that the pig Iron furnaces of
Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky and
Virginda are running to their full ca?
pacity, with orders so far ahead that
they do not seem warranted in even
stopping for usual repairs, demon?
strates thait the South is at the height
of prosperity, and that It is the section
to which men desiring to engage in al?
most any line of business can do so
with reasonable assurance of success,
providing they bring knowledge and
energy into the venture.
SUCCESSFUL* MANUFACTURING.
"The successful manufacture of basic
steel In July, 1897, in the Birmingham
district from the phosphoric iron of the
South marked a new epoch in the lion
Industry of the South, for it placed her
In advance in ability to furnish the
cheapest possible raw material for the
use of the steel Industry. This success
has happily led up to the Investment
of large amounts of additional capi?
tal, and especially now being employ?
ed In the erection of an extensive basic
steel plant at Ensley, near Birming?
ham, Ala, Before that plant has been
completed, capital Is investing quite
freely in steel manufacturing plants
designed to consume the manufactured
steel and to forge and weld it into
structural steel rnd Into other steel
products. Thus the advance from the
experimental stage in the Birmingham
district only a few months ago has
gone on to a successful twelve-month
demonstration of the economic possi?
bilities in the manufacture of steel at
Birmingham, and to the next stage of
the Investment of millions of dollars
in industrial plants allied thereto.
What this foretells of the future of
steel manufacture in the South can
hardly be realized, so great are the
possibilities in that development.
IMPROVEMENTS EVERYWHERE.
"From an industrial and commercial
standpoint the entire territory tribu?
tary to the Southern Railway shows a
marked increase generally. It is safely
predicted that the number of Industrial
enterprises will be increased and many
of those already established enlarged,
and that the commerce of the South
promises well for those engaged there?
in. While It Is possibly true that low
priced cotton has been a drawback,
In many localities that has been fully
overcome by a more than usual diver?
sification of crops, the farmers raising
their own corn, pork, hay and other
farm supplies, and in many cases hav?
ing a surplus to sell. Where this has
been the case the evil results of cheap
raw cotton as a one and single crop
has been to a-large extent overcome.
The movement for diversified agricul?
ture is growing fast, and it is clear
that the 1R99 Southern crops of wheat,
corn, rye, hogs, cattle, sheep and other
products will be greatly increased over
former years. Advance in agriculture
in the South is keeping In line with the
great development of manufactures,
such as we note in the erection of cot?
ton mills, furniture factories, other
woodworking plants, machine shops,
etc. '
"It is not necessary to refer in de?
tail to these new Industries. It is suffi?
cient to say that the growth of cotton,
leather, hardwood and lumber manu?
factures still continues with unabated
advancement, while iron manufacture
has now extended to steel production.
Coal and coke production has responded
to the advance In the iron business,* so
that Southern coal mines promise to
make 1899 the banner year."
DIVERSIFIED FARMING PAYS.
F. A. Hornbeck, land commissioner
Kansas City, Plttsburg and Gulf Rail?
road Company. Kansas City, Mo.:
"In western Arkansas and Louisiana
and eastern Texas the past two years
have witnessed n general Increase in
values and marvelous di-velopment in
manufacturing and In trade consequent
to the building of the K- C. P. and O.
R. R. through the territory described.
The farmers of this district. Immi?
grants from the North, as well as resi?
dents of long standing, have realized
that while cotton has its uses to the
fnrmer as a farming product, at thi
same time diversified farming is the'
solution of his problem In life. Near'
Slloam Springs and Fort Smith. Ark./
the fact that profits in strawberry culA
ture frequently run from $100 to $2fJ0
net per acre has opened the eyes "bt
many farmers who were wedded to the
old cotton idol. /
"Generally^ speaking, throughout the
same district industrial activity has
been very great. There are about/133
mills on the K. C. P. and O. R?>R-.
partly in western Louisiana and srfuth
western Arkansas. Fuliy 75 perAent.
of these mills have been located m the
raat two years. Cities and towns&have
sprung up as if by magic, and thd?arge
sums paid out I", wages have glvta this
whole country an era of general pros?
perity."
THE RAILROADS PROSPEROUS.
Col. J. H. KUlebrew, Immigration I
agent Nashville. Chattanooga and St.
Louis Railway, Nashville, Tenn.:
"Every railroad in the South enjoys I
an unusual prosperity. The price of |
Iron was long considered the best ba?
rometer of trade. When the price of I
Iron was high, trade was good, and
when the price fell trade fell with it,
but In more recent yeans a better ba?
rometer Is the condition of the rail?
roads of the country. Whenever and
wherever the railroads are prosperous
the country through which they pass
Is prosperous also, and vice versa. Take
the Nashville, Chattanooga and St.
Louis railway as an example. For six I
years prior to 1S9S there was only one
month In which the'groes earnings ex?
ceeded $500,000, but for seven months
during the present year the earnings |
have gone beyond that amount. In
other words, during seventy-two
months previous to 1S9S there was only
one month In which the earnings j
reached $;">00.000. while there have been
seven months during the present year
month. This shows more clearly than
that they have exceeded $500,000
almost any statement that can be made
the prosperity of that region through
which this railway passes, and the |
prosperity of the road Itself. Nor is It |
alone In this. The Louisville and |
Nashville railroad has enjoyed proba?
bly the greatest prosperity during the
present year that it has ever had, and
the same may be said of several other
railroads In the South."
PRESIDENT HOFFMAN'S VIEWS.
R. C. Hoffman, president Seaboard
Air Line System, Baltimore, Md.:
"I do not think that there id a ques?
tion that the South has been much less I
affected by the prices of cotton this
year than is generaJIy believed. In
fact, you hear much less about the
'ruination of low prices.' I believe that
cotton can be raised at present prices
in the South at a pro-fit by those who
work, and every year the Southern peo?
ple learn' more and more to diversify
their crops, and their other crops have
been very fine this year. I think the
South'has now fairly entered upon an
era of prosperity. I think that the
manufacturers have made producers,
and therefore large consumers of a
very large class of population, which
heretofore have actually produced or
consumed nothing (outside of them?
selves), and that the employment of
this class has In nowise Interfered
with ths agricultural Interests, or the
actual producer?! heretofore, and I
think tne general condition of the peo?
ple will show this. Of course, there are
always grumblers, and the South Is not
free from that class, but you know
that I am a believer In the future o{
the Southern country and the Southern
people."
. THE OUTLOOK GOOD.
M. E. Ingalls, president Chesapeake
and Ohio Railway Company, Cincin?
nati, Ohio:
"I cannot sreak as to the remote
South, but the Southern territory which
the Chesapeake and Ohio railway
serves, to wit., Kentucky, West Vir?
ginia and Virginia, Is very prosperous
to-day, and the outlook for the future
seems to me to be good. Kentucky in
1S9S raised good crops, nil of which are
finding a ready sale. Wheat, cor'a and
stock bring good prices. West Virginia
is the richest land.In the world,; in my
Judgment, In coal, and Its future de?
pends entirely upon Its development.
There seems to be a demnnd for It
East and West to-day greater than the
transportation companies caii fill. I I
look to see this demand Increase rather |
than diminish. In old Virginia there i
seems to be an Improvement all along J
our lines. The manufacturers are
making money and people are beginning
to realize that it is one df the best
States in the Union for manufacturing;
a beautiful climate, the cfieapest and]
best labor In the world and moderate
taxes. The developments there in the
future will be very great/'
A BLESSING IN DISGUISE.
Leroy Springs, president Lancaster |
and Chester Railway Company, Lan?
caster, S. C:
"I think the general Industrial and
business situation of the South Is In a
healthy state, and the outlook for the
future is very promising. The present
low price of cotton seems to have been
a blessing In disguise, ns the farmers
are learning to cultivate their lands
better, using more fertilizers and pro?
ducing more to the acre. They are also
educating themselves to make all their
supplies at home: are devoting more
-attention to the improvement of their
farms and their general condition. The
manufacturing industries throughout
this section seem/ to be In a healthy
condition where t'aey are well managed.
I think South Carolina has only made
a beginning towards industrial in?
stitutions of all kinds."
ANALYSIS OJ^ THE SITUATION.
George C. Smith, president and gene?
ral manager Atlanta and West Point
railroad. ;iie Western Railway of Ala?
bama, Atlanta, Ga.:
"Our section of country 1s rich In
resources and s' ?tied with a progres?
sive and lndust. i'ous people, who will
give a good account of themselves, no
matter what the price of cotton may
be this season or next."
M. V. Richards, land and Industrial
agent, Southern Railway, Washington,
D. C:
"Permit the following analysis of the
situation, viz: The South has (I) excel?
lent credit, (2) splendid crops. (3) pros?
perous factories. (4) growing trade,
(5) abundant natural resources, (6)
a contented people, and by reason
thereof its Industrial and commercial
affairs occupy a conspicuous and en?
viable position."
A. E. Stillwell, president Kansas City,
Plttsburg and Gulf Railroad Company,
New York, N. Y.:
"I have not time to give you a
lengthy nrticle in regard to prospects
for business in the South, but can only
(Chicago Record.)
naval officer who has Just return
from Manila brings with him a
g/iod story, it Is customary when men
war go out for target practice to
tow away the china and glassware
'of the shin, which are likely to be
hi "ken by the concussion that always
follows the firing of the big sains. Wh?n
.mo of the thirteen-inch rilles on the
forward deck goes off it feels as If
the vessel had been struck by light?
ning, and to save breakage fragile
articles are packed away. Similar pre?
parations were made for the fight at
Manila, and when the battle was over
and the Spanish fleet wns destroyed
It took some daya to get things read
Justed on the ships and restored to
their proper places. Two or three
uays after the battle Admiral De.vey
noticed that an article of table furni?
ture In his cabin was missing, and
called his Chinese servant's attention
to the fact. "Alle light. Me put him
'way so him don't pet bloke while you
plactice on the Spaniards. He come
back belly soon."
Miss Mamie Upton is quite sick at the
residence of her brother, Mr. S. B. Up?
ton, on Payne street.
Dr. Moore continues auite sick at
residence on Chestnut street.
The Christmas tree Friday night at
the Berkley Avenue Baptist Church
was beautifully and artistically arrang?
ed.
Mr. C. R. Davis and wife left yester?
day for Elizabeth City, N. C.
Mrs. E. C. Godfrey left yesterday for
Columbia, N. C. to spend several days.
Mr. A. W. Petty has returned from
Weldon, N. C, where he spent the hol?
idays.
Mr. Alton Haley returned from Rich?
mond yesterday.
Mr. and Mrs. J. \V. Rogers and son
returned from Petersburg yesterday,
where they spent very pleasantly the
holidays with relatives.
Mrs. Thomas Orouse has been visit?
ing friends In town for several days.
She returned yesterday to her home" In
Elizabeth City, N. C.
Perhaps the largest number of col?
ored people ever congregated to wit?
ness any case before a county Justice
was before Justice Tlllotson, at Town
Hall at 12:30 p. tn. yesterday. The
warrant was read, charging E. Bowser
with unlawfully attempting to exhume
the remains of old "Aunt Jane" Rid?
ley, who was buried Thursday last.
Bowser was represented by Mr. George
G. .Martin, Ibf this place, and Mr. it.
W. Shuttle/, of Norfolk, for the pros?
ecution. 7#ie witnesses examined tes?
tified abo'Ji as follows:
Bowseri/vas seen to come from his
establishment with a wagon containing
a coffin between 7 and S o'clock. His
driver continued In the direction of
Mount Olive Cemetery, and Dowser
went i up the Belt Eine rail?
road 'ard was seen by three differ?
ent perrons at different intervals going
In the direction of the cemetery. A
short time later the same three men.
SUspicionlng him. followed en towards
the cemetery, and saw two men carry?
ing a coffin to the grave of the person
mentioned above and began to exhume
the coriwse?ono at the hood and the
othetr at the foot. On seeing this the
three men went back for other persons,
as was stated In yesterday's local, who
came and frightened the exhumers off
and found the coffin at the grave. Bow?
ser had no witnesses at all.
Justice Tlllotson withheld his deci?
sion until 10 a. m. Monday, and Bow?
ser was put under a J100 bond.
The Junior Society of Christian En?
deavor will meet this afternoon at 2:30
o'clock. Good singing and earnest
praying. Rev. Mr. Gatewood, of the
St. Paul Church, will address the so?
ciety. A cordial Invitation is extend?
ed to all children of the town by the
president. Mr. Thad M. Jones.
We were misinformed In regard to
Mrs. L. N. Goodwin using her influ?
ence to secure the easy chair presented
Rev. M. W. Butler Friday night. To
Mrs. George Lewis the credit is due.
BERKLEY ADVTS
BARGAINS
In Perfumery, Toilet Articles, Fancy Ato
mlr.crs, Bottles, etc., for the next ten
da>!< nl.?o in stock full line of Drugs,
Medicines. Brushes, Hot Water Pottles
Fountain Syrinse. Cigars, Tobacco anc
Pipes. Special attention given to pre?
scription filling, and the best nu-dlelnes
gunranteed. WALLACE PHARMACY.
WALLACE & CO..
Cor. Berkley avenue and Chestnut St.
New 'phone 12TS. de22-lw
JOHN S. ETHERIDGE.
?IVERY AND BOARDING STABLES.
BERKLET. VA.
Norfolk and Portsmouth trade solicited
New Phono No. 1.203.
JU GRIMES. RENTAL AGENT.
? can be seen at City Drug Store on
Saturday night of each week. delO-lm
ASK FOR J. F. DAVIS'. BERKLEY
Gentlemen and Vala Rosa, the best
5c. Cigars on the market,corner Chestnut
and Pin; streets. dell-lm
ITTLE
IVEL
PILLS.
MM
Glck lleartarho and reliovo all tho troubles Inol
ileur to a bilious ?tat?? of the system, such
Dizziness. Nausea, Priwsluesi. Distress sftrr
eating. I'aln In the BMe. fcc. Willis that* moat
rt-iaarkable success hau boun Mown 1? curing
Headache, ynt Carter'? Llttlo Liver rills are
equally valuablo la Constliutien. curing and pre?
venting tlilBnniioylner..Ji!iplaliit.w!illP they also
correct all diaordern of the iio.iiach.atiniuUte th?
liver and regulate tho bowel*. Even if they only
cured
Aabethey wor.ld bo almost prleelOMto those who
miner from UtUtUitietslnftcomplaint; foutfortu
iiitely their g nod mm? dot r intend here .ami thoso
who ones try them will dm' theae little pills valu?
able in ao many ways mat they will not bo wil?
ling to do without the in. lint after ailelck head
Is tho bone of so mary Uvea ihat hero I? where
Tra make our great boast. Our pills euro it wliila
others do -.int.
Carter'? Littlo Liver rilbarn very 'malt and
very easy to tnke. Ono or two ] Ills mates, does.
They aro strictly Ycge tablo and do not grips OB '
pnrga. l>utl>y their gmitloaction pliiseall whtt
uielhom. iDTlalsatlacenU; fiveforjt. Uol3
by druggists everywhere, or sent by raiil.
CARTER MEDICINE CO., New York.
W fi!. hd fad Rice.
L. LANGB?LLE,
ICE CREAM PARLOR
WHOLESALE RlflHUFHQTURLR
We can furnish you with a better and
cheaper cream than It is possible to get
elsewhere. Come and sample our cream
and get prices and bo convinced.
CHURCH STREET, OPPOSITE HOLT.
BOTH PHONES. 653.
aull-eod-su.tu.th-tf
IRWIN S EXPRESS CO.,
218 Water St., Phone 6,Either Phone
We haul anything to and from any.
where in tha three cities.
Special facilities for hauling . Bares.
Boilers. Furniture and Pianos.
Lota filled and filling.wanted.
-?-?;^j>: f^==^^H|
FREE TO lp
is YouiijLooo rasi ?|
Thousands of Sufferers fiom Bad Effibod'^jv
manently Cured by B. B. E&
To Prove the Wonderful Merits of Botanio Blood Ba?p (B.l 2.) o*
Three Bs, every reader of Norfolk Virgin?fh-P??t
may have a Sample Bottle sent Free by WsSL
Every one who Is a sufferer from bad
blood In any form should write Blood
Balm Company for a sample bottle of
tholr famous B. B. B. ?Botanic Blood
Balm. B. U. B. drives the bad blood out
of the b^dy, getting- rid of It forever. Have
you Impure blood In any form, evidence
of which you seo In
Pimplos, Eczema, Unsightly Blem?
ishes, Eruptions^
Deadly Cancer, Ulcers, Sores,
Scrofula, Little Sores
on Lip or Throat, Boils, Blotches,
Catarrh, Rheumatism,
Bono Pains, Broken Down Con?
stitutions, Blood Poison.
or any other sign of blood taint? It this
is your trouble then B. B. B. will cure
you. That is what Botanic Blood Balm
is made for. It Is not "a euro all." B. B.
B cures only blood dlsenses so If you
want to (ret rid of those unsightly sores
take B. B. B. and you will be cured for?
ever. To prove to you what we know to
be true, we offer to send a sample bJttlo
of B. B. B. Tree to nil who write us for !t.
The cn'ects of B. B. B. are benellclal in
a few hours after takln? It. No ono can
anord to treat blood diseases lightly. You
never know how or when bad blood will
break out, perhaps In a cancer, ulcer or
catarrh. The most trifling pimple may
develop Into a terrible cancer. A bruise
on the !<?>;. unless it heul? at once, may
be the beg niiing of a chronic uletr. Pim?
ples and sort s on the face can never bo
cured with cosmetics or salvts because
the trouble Is deep down below the sur?
face In the blood. Strike a blow where
th? disease- Is strongest; and iS*t Ut Saarn
by taking b. b. b. and idrlvb?tjj tSS3
out of tho body; Jb tt 1* wsSrJSfi
?uredand m "^4%
People who are predisposed t? blood dt?,
orders may experience: any o?*
th? following oyropfcMna: Thai h\wA ?h?
vital functions are enfeebled conwtffeioi!
shattered, shaky herves. falU^of the
hair, disturbed. sluwt?er< iMeral thbu
ness and Isck of vitality. ^W^otSlSS
is bad and breatfc touL In?? blood'S^S '
hot In the flngero a?d there are^hS*
flushes all wer tVbody. If you h?*
ot thes? symptoms your blood i, morale
loss diseased and 1?-'-liable to ?how Itself
In Borao form of sor* or blemish Ta*Z
b. b. B. at one? and get rid of tho in*
ward humor before U grows wors? a? ;t
Is bound to do unless th? blood is
strengthened and sweetened.
Botaiik) Blood Balm (B. B b.) 1? ttm
discovery of Dr. GllUm-, tt? Atlanta SDtc
cialist on blood disposes, and h? us?f B
b Et. In hi? prtva-t? praotlce for 30 years
with Invariable govd results. B B B
does-, not contain mineral or vexet&bl?
po-^son ana la perfectly safe to take by th*
infant and the elderly &nd feeble. Afte?
using b. B. b. tho patltnt experiences a.
delightful constitutional chcjiae. besides
having th? blood hurhera cureo,
Tho above statements of facts prove
enough fpr any Sufferer -from. Blood
Humors that Botanic Blood Balm (B ^Ek
b.) or three b's cures terrible Blood'di?
seases, and that It la worth wh'J? to rive
th? Remedy a trial, | The medicine Is for
aale by druggists everywhere at Ii ?er
larg? bottle, or all large bottles for JS
but aamplo bottles can only be obtained
of Blood Balm. Co. Writ? to-d?y
yourself or friends. Address ptalnlT
blood baust CO., a Mitchell bi?/?
Atlaata, Geortria, and ?ample bottle of B
B- M^i, ,amJL Valuable panibhlet on Blood
and Skin Diseases will bo sent you by re?
turn mail. lt
TATES
-(NEW PHONE)
EXCHANGES AND OFFICES:
264 Main Street
BRANCH EXCHANGES:
Norfolk, Portsmouth; 'Berkley, St?fQtk? T&ntf^tTopf?nlir?
Holland, Carrsville, Old Point, I^ampton, Phoebus,
Soldier's Home, Poquoson, Fox Hill, Newport News. -
LIST OF NEW SUBSCRIBERS.
Please cut this out and paste in your catalogue:
NORFOLK.
6S5
SS8
87
34-3
SI
61tl
S97
33S
715
84
1015-3
427
1167
571
71
35S
2SI
1GS3
810
7!>1
693
151
1146
631
77?
446
607
4S2
241
71
459
6S1
1122
70
66S
316
678
1033
1?02
1010
47
1162
10!>2
77
510
Anderson & Co.. J. P.....Commission Merchants _Roanoke Dock
Batcheldor & Wise .Brokers .Water and Commerce sts.
Bateson & Co.. X. Maine.Brokers .Citizens' Bank Building
Raker. Dr. B. M.Of nee.61 Granliy street
B. & Ohio Ticket Office .A. G. Lewis. Agent.Main streit
Bell & Vanco .lv.Steel Roofing .Plume street
Blount & Co.. D. P.Commission Merchants _Roanoke Dock ?
Breese, C. Parker .Consulting Engineer..Citizens' Bank Btdg
Carey, T. J.Residence, .i.Grigsby Place
Cofer, J. H.Broker.Citizens" Bank Bulldlns
Drewry, Dr. H. J.Residency . J.Lambert's Point
Degnou & McLean .Contractors .Citizens' Bank Building
Dey ltae .Grocers .t.525 Church street
Eberhard, Arnoid .ArohUect .C?zens' Bank Building
Fleishman Yeast Company .Cove street
Fox. Miss .Residence .Ghent
Harrison Transfer Company .Commerce 6treet
Halli-y, J. A.Residence.25 North street .
Hoflulmer. W. II."...Loan Office .Morltz Building
Hudspeth. O. B.Residence.9 Grlgsby Plac?
Irvine. Walter F., Jr.Offtco .Citizens' Bank Building
Judson. Ix-o .Attorney...Academy of Mus'.c Bids ?
Lambert, Capt. L. W.Grocer .;. Lambert's Point
Kayton. A. L.Residence ..........,i509 Freemason street
King Tfa end Coffee Company....W. C. King .j.59 Market Place
I.c\vls. Jone.-< & Waring.Attorneys.Columbia Building
Miller. B.Wholesale Shoes .150 Water street
Mrtzgur. N. & B. F.Tobacconists..Water st and Roanoke av.
Norfolk Dispatch .Office ..Plume street
Ocean House .Saloon .;.Main street
Owen, H. E., Grain Company. .Citizens' Bank Building
Postier, Mrs.Millinery .4-.....Granby street
Prince. J. C.Residence
I est house .Keeper's residencf.
Roanoke River and R. R. Lumber Co
fcitlzena' Bank Building
Sadler. W. A.Commission Mercpant .Roanoke Dock
Smith AV Bnllance .Grocer
Star Restaurant .i
Sterling, Dr. D. G.
Suburban Feed Store.W. II,
Sutlon. Dr. S. A.Office
Truxton. Mrs. M, C.Residence
Wilkinson, L. J.Residence
Wood. C. R.Grocer ...
Weaver. R. S.Broker
Wilkinson & Co.. G. F..
.623 Granby street
Brewer Street
... Market Place
6SS Church street
Old. Manifcer .Park aventt*
.Main street
256 Freemason street
.Si High street
,.Granby street
Citizens' Bank Building
.Brokers ....I.Water street
PORTSMOUTH.
933 N. Y., P. & N. R. R.Office .
1328 Ralll Bros.Warehouse
South Atlantic Export Co.Office .
13S5 W'.llls, Jr., Jno. .Furniture ..
BERKLEY.
1221 Mercer J. W.,.,.Grocer ....
1239 Tunis & Taylor .Attorneys
PRINCESS ANNE COUNTY LINE.
(PRINCESS ANNE TELEPHONE CO.)
1IS6-S
11 :.?;-?
nre-a
1166-4
2-4
1I56.-J
5-3
2-2
.Port Nerfolic
.Crawford street
.....Pinner's Point
Crawford and High a to.
.Chestnut street
.Todd Block
Booker & Son, E. EX....'..Grocers .....
Burgess. J. I......Grocer .
Ferratt. J. B.Swift Track
Ilerrick. J. I.Grocer .
Mcars, C. D.5.Grocer .
Miles Co., W. II.Grocers.
McClcllan. A. U.Farm.
Nutting, Mrs. H. S.P03t?ffic<s ..
Wilson, Capt. Chs*. w.Cm ich l-anf)
TOLL STATIONS
TOLL CHARGES 10 CENTS
Jacksondale .Mr. Norris ...
Lomlon Bridge. .Ewel & Lane.
O.-e.ma .Mrs, Runalda
Statnck .Dr. Miller....
Virginia Beach .Griggs & Co. .
...Lynnhftve?
.. .iiynnhtven
.Broad (Jreelc
...KerurivlUa
....KemjfivUIei
.Broad CrteekTRoad
.Near KeirfoavlUe
.Broad Creek
.Near Keuipavin*
SMITHFIELD.
TOLL 25 CENTS.
Our next Subscribers' Catalogue will be Issued I? a ti
now and your name will appear in that Issue. W? ?s>J
vice at low ratesl
days. Sena your order*
ueo Wbtltikciory aer*
SOUTHERN STATES TELEPHONE C?.
?e?.lt
WM. PANNIU,
. H?
^sWBnHMBaH

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