OCR Interpretation


Virginian-pilot. (Norfolk, Va.) 1898-1911, June 30, 1899, Image 4

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86071779/1899-06-30/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

VIRGINIAN - PILOT.
?1 L, -BY THE?
{Virginia*? and pidut publjsiiino
COMfAN Y.
NORFOLK VIKGIKIM HD DAILY PILOT.
(Coaito?ittated March, jkos.)
Kmerr.il at the Posiofflco at Norfolk.
Vn., as second-class matter.
offices pilot huildino.
citv iia ayknuk,
norfolk. va.
officers:
A. H. Uraudy. President: W. S. Wilk?
inson. Treasurer; James E. Al'en, See
tcury.
board of directors:
A. H. virandy, U l> Starke, Jr.. T. \V.
Clielton. ?-:. W. i/.liulilce W. f*. Wilkinson.
Juincs u\ Alien, D. B'. Donovan.
in it*:*: ck.x 11 i?i-:at rin'v.
subscription rates:
Toe v'ItGI Nl ak-pi LOT :s delivered !<i
subscribers by currier? in Noffollc au.I
y.cinit- Portsmouth. Berkley. Suffolk.
,?Yest Norfolk, .Newport Ncf?, tor :0
cents per week payable to tho cairler.
i'y m?ur tj otly p|aCo la Iii? ?ntl'eU
titles, paslag? tree:
J>AII.Y, oue yriir - C-*> ?"
'* six moiitli? ... ii. tit1
" iii reo inoiillia - . J.*>n
" OIICI IIKIIllll _ ? . ..',(>
ADVKRTISINO RATES: A?v?Tll?e
n:entd leserteu at tho rale of 1i cents a
bquaro. Ili'si inscrlUn; euch BUliseqlielM
Insertion 4j cents, or ?O -.cr.t?, when in?
serted Eviry Other Day Contractors mo
not allowed to exceed their space or ?ct
Vertlse oilier than ihclr IcEUI.nalc blts.
ness, except by pnylrii; especially for tho
?arr e.
KeaJlng Notices Invar'abiy ? cents per
line first innen!on. Each subsequent In?
sertion 15 cents.
No employee of the Virglnlan-P'.lot Pub?
lishing Company ia authorised to contract
any obligation In the name of the com?
pany, or to make purchases in the name
of the same, except upon orders smned by
tho PRESIDENT OK THE COMPANY.
In order In avoid actuys. on ncco'Jnt of
pt-rsonul absence, ietters end nit commu?
nications for Th?. V1 BO IN I AN -1*1 LOT
should not be addressed lo any Individual
connected with tho ofllee but simply to
The VIRGINIAN AND' HLO'I PUB
LiSllINC COMPANY.
TWFLVE PAGES
FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 1S09.
WE HOWL AGAIN!
The people should lend some of their
careful attention to the testimony now
coming before the Industrial commis?
sion In Washington. It may not all be
so sensational and startling as Have
meyer's unexpected assault upon the
tariff, but a great deal of It is more Im?
portant in revealing the real truth of
the situation, despite the shouts of
prosperity from those who profit out of
the misfortunes, necessities and calam?
ities of the country. On last Tuesday,
Mr. Jamea Barrett, vIce-President of
the Georgia State Agricultural Society,
dared to tell the truth of our condition,
despite the organized lying of the
money-trust and the cowardly corrobo
ratlon of this lying given by Southern
gold-Democrats; and it will be noted
that his brief picture of the times is
very different from that presented by
the dealers in "a limited prosperity for
the rich" and who scream at the deal?
ers In truth as "calamity howlers." Mr.
Barrett Is reported by the Richmond
Times, as follows:
"He spoke upon the agricultural con?
ditions of the South, saying that they
"were worse to-day than they had ever
been in the history of the country. He
Bald the cotton Interest was especially
depressed, prices last year amounting
to a little over 4 cents a pound.
Mr. Barrett said that, nlne-tentha of
the cotton grown was mortgaged be?
fore it matured. Rates of Interest and
commission were high and the mer?
chants were gradually coming into pos?
session of the land. The banks charged
in p?r cent, for money for three
months' time. He advanced the idea
that the National Bank act has done
vast damage In outlaying real estate
ns security for money loaned to these
banks, and that all told this act was
to the South the most damaging leg?
islation that had ever been enacted."
Although Mr. Barrett was the only
witness before the commission on Tues
day, and although his testimony was
evidently very important, that was all
he was allowed to say, or all that was
allowed to reach the public through the
Associated Press. Any commercial
traveler or drummer who had forced
himself upon the commission, and told
Arabian Nights Stories of prosperity
in some nutmeg-manufacture, or In the
development of the toothpick industry,
would have been heard for hours and
accorded columns of report. But our
current secular news and situation are
under as close a censorship and sup?
pression as the press-correspondence
from Manila and Havana.
On last Wednesday, Mr. J. Polk
Brown, President of the Agricultural
State Society of Georgia was heard by
the Industrial Commission. The press
report (which we also clip from the
Richmond Times) Is as follows:
"He agreed with Mr. Barrett, who
testified yesterday that the condition of
agriculture In the South was more de?
pressed than It had ever been. MORE
PEOPLE WEHE PLOWING BARE?
FOOTED AND BAREHEADED THAN
EVER BEFORE. He agreed with the
late Henry Grady that the fault was
not with the soli or the climate, nor,
as many had claimed, was It entirely
with the tariff. One of the most pro?
lific causes of the trouble was In the
fact that cotton was practically the
only crop.
"Education, he considered, was not
sufficiently practicable. It should teach
people to do manual labor. So far as
the colored race was concerned there
?was no opening for them in trade or
the professions.
"Mr. Brown dwelt on the presence of
the negro as the special cause of the
want of development in the South. He
regarded him as retarding the Indus
fertou* moral, religious, social and ag
rlculturnl development of the section
and he felt that If they were nbsent a
better class of labor would take their
place. .'The more tho negro was paid
.he lors efficient he was as a laborer.
Mr. Brown wanted the race eeparated
from the whites and colonized either In
this country or ei.rewhere In the Inter?
est of the Southern States.
"THE ORK AT OBSTACLE IN THE
WAY OF MANUFACTURING DE?
VELOPMENT WAS THE WANT OF
MONEY.
"Mr. Brown advocated diversified
croi recommending that each com?
munity should raise sufficient of every?
thing to meet its own demands."
Evidently. Mr. Brown believes that
Goorgla is on the eve of a complete
money-famine, and that her only hope,
at least In some sections of the county,
is In that barter to which Southwestern
Virginia is already driven, as testified
t" by Mr. D?na way, of Marlon. Va.. In
a recent letter to the Richmond Times,
but which the Times actually perverts
into a proof that scarcity of money is
no deprivation, 1f the barter it forces
people back to be not a great blessing.
Such editorial gymnastics would he
very funny, if they were not exhibited
in a matter that demands our most se?
rious and logical pondering.
The report of the hearing before the
Industrial commission on Wednesday,
gives the evidence of Mr. P. H. Love
joy, of l-lawkinsvllle, (Ja., a merchant
and planter, who Is thus reported:
"He spoke especially of the relations
of the local merchants and the farm?
ers. The merchants themselves had
no) been prosperous tor several years.
They were compelled to make the ma?
jority of their sales on credit or had
tu take mortgages upon the land of the
farmers, if they had any, or on their
crora If they had no land. Many cf|
them were not able to give collateral
of any value, and to such men sales
were made on large margins of profit.
TAKE WHAT HE HAS.
" 'We size the man up." he said.
'If he Is pood we sell to him on a small
margin. If he is a hard case we take
what he has and quit.'
"He said than freight rates from
Georgia tu New York were about twice
what they are from New York to (Jeor
gia. The large cities were evidently be?
ing built up tit the expense of the coun?
try. Even the watermelon crop was
unfavora blc.
" 'We have found that In shipping
melons we pay the freight.' he said.
'The railroads cut us out of profit in
that business." "
HISTORIANS AND HISTORIANS
The South wants an American His?
tory from the Southern standpoint, and
several attempts to supply this want
have been made by various more or
less competent hands, with more or lese
success?generally less. The difficulties
besetting such a history are great and
many. The South was defeated. The
records and memories pour scrvir were
made principally by Northern pens and
press, and this evidence, official, origi?
nal, private and other, is chiefly in the
b;nnds of the Federal government; such
histories as have appeared since th?
war are from Northern sources and au?
thors; the South Is still the weaker, the
poorer and less numerous party; and
in all the means and appliances of
press and literature the South is at
every disadvantage. If the South has
any advantages at all, t.'tev are all de?
rived from a great cause, and the
zealous and faithful unanimity of the
Southern devotion to it. Perhaps, too,
there is some real advantage to the
South in tho smaller number of com?
petitors In writing its history.
It is Just to assume that the history
the South dec. I res is a true, able and
well fortified story, in full sympathy
with the South and its cause, and with
no concessions of fact or principle to
curry favor with Northern sentiment,
yet with no design to revive or perpet?
uate sectional, or political, or party
prejudices and animosities. Neverthe?
less, we are hard to please. As unani?
mous as we were and are. we differ
greatly as to details and as to the man?
ner of telling the t&UT.
Our local morning contemporary sug?
gests and urges, as a 6tep to overcome
the difficulty, that wc creato a Profes?
sor of American History In connection
with tho University of Virginia, who,
being endowed with ample time and fa?
cilities, will vindicate himself and his
Office by writing the Southern history
so strongly in request.
THE VIROINIAN-PILOT will not'
object to such a Professorship, provided
the necessary funds, &c, are forth*
coming to establish this extrordlnary
and special office in addition to the ex?
isting historical Professorship; but it
does protest against what seems to he
proposed by the Landmark, that this
extraordinary functionary shall be de>
putcd to write any history whatever
American or Virginian. Historians are
not thus made or selected, and still loss
are histories thus made to order. If
we are to have history after that man?
ner, let a committee select n com?
petent newspaper reporter; give hirn his
materials and authorities; and then
fully instruct him as to how the facts,
&c. are to he presented;?and we shall
wager that In such case the reporter's
report will surpass the historian's his?
tory, in all respects, as far as cheese
Is superior to chalk.
Wc shall get our history after we
have achieved our historian. How wc
shall achieve him is "one of those
things no fellow can find out" an evo?
lution that cotneth without groaning or
conjuration; yet, when he come, he
shall write, whether ho please or dis?
please; and his story shall be our story,
though we raise up the dead to prove
him a liar, and deafen heaven and
earth with our denials and adjurations.
The lower the taxes In proportion to
the number, wealth and prosperity of
the people, the better the government.
Great revenues and public extrava?
gance make bad government.
HOWLING DERVISHES.
Speaking of the hard-times and the
general depression of business which
culminated under Cleveland, the Balti?
more Sun says:
"The real causes of the stagnation
were the legislative blunders of Repub?
lican politicians, which wore unhappily
afterward adopted, largely by Demo?
cratic politicians."
And yet tho Sun refuses to see the
real state of the case: That both par?
ties were run by the same trust or
combine, especially with respect to
money and finance; that Cleveland and
his faction had surrendered to the same
money-power that has been master of
the Republican party ever since the
war; and that this alarming perfidy to
Democracy was but an Indication of the
dominant spread of a sordid demoniacal
possession, to which religion, morality,
patriotism, sectionalism, party and
principle were In abject submission. .
This demoniacal possession the Demo?
crats as a party succeeded in throwing
off in 1S96; but the possessed, still under
the delusion of devils, are wandering
and raving like lunatics, abusing Dem?
ocracy, yet claiming to be* Democrats
while serving Republicanism with all
the fanaticism of howling dervishes.
GOOD ROADS MUST COME.
We clip the following from the Wil?
mington (N. C) Star, and the more
gladly because In North Carolina pro?
bably |i.n?:cr and more thoroughly than
in any other State, the experiment of
employing convict labor on public
roads has been fairly and intelligently
tried and tested. Says the Star:
Prof. Holmes. State Geologist, struck
the bed-rock of hard sense when he
expressed the hope that "the time
would soon come when every convict
in North Carolina whose term of sen?
tence does not exceed ten years will
be at work on the public roads." That's
the shortest, easiest and. in fact, the
only way to satisfactorily solve the
convict labor problem.
THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT has con?
stantly labored to solve both the road
improvement problem and that of
convict employment at once In this
system so commended by Professor
Holmes and so approved by experience;
but there will be no solution here
(though it has been so obviously press?
ed on our attention by the exigencies
of both problems) until the aroused
people take these matters In hand, dis?
miss the speculators, and their
schemes, and demand that the State
and people shall profit by the labor of
the lawless in the creation of a good
road-system.
Without competition, there Is no lib?
erty.
Without competition, there are no
rights.
Without competition, monopoly is the
oppression of all by the tyranny of the
most rapacious.
Without competition, there is no free
trade, no free living, no free labor, no
freedom in anything except to starve.
Our colonial departure now requires
a colonial department. We have got
along very well, however, without a
territorial department. But the pres?
sure for offices and spoils is very heavy
and steadily increasing. In fact. If
government be not a big department
store, it Is a big department concern to
provide places for place-hunters.
A people too stupid to comprehend
the condition In which they are put
by trusts, combines, monopoly and the
money-power, or without the sense to
see and the pluck to do what Is neces?
sary for their own deliverance and
safety, deserve their fate in all its bit?
terness. But it is a pity and a shame
that their unmanliness should subject
better men to the same cruel servitude.
Here is an apposite bit of wisdom
from Rudyard Kipling's "Sea to Sea:"
6ays he (at Hong Kong), "I have had
my boots blacked at once every time I
happened to take them off. The black?
er did not do it for the sake of a gra?
tuity, but because it was his work.
Like the beaver of old, HE HAD TO
CLIMB THAT TREE; THE DOGS
WERE AFTER HIM. THERE WAS
COMPETITION. ? ? ? LET US AN?
NEX CHINA."
There is competition.
Rudyard Kipling, in extolling the ser?
vice of Chinese attendants over that of
East Indians, accounts for the superior
service by competition: ttie Chinese be^
Ing likened to the beaver of old, who,
says Kipling, "had to climb that tree.
The dogs were after him."
True: but he was at liberty, and there
was the tree. He could climb, and did
it,?escaping the dogs. Without com?
petition, monopoly has him enmeshed
In the net of monopoly, where he is
slain, or starved, incapable of escape or
resistance.
The Washington correspondent of the
Baltimore Sun fools that Dogberrian
journal to the top of its bent. "Shall
cheap men like Bryan, and a rabble of
common people, ef no having, degrade
the Democratic party to sliver, whon
we gentlemen sf goli ebjeet?" cries the
correspondent seethingly te the Sun.
"No, never! Wo have shewn them how
we can help elect a Republican Presi?
dent, rather than submit to any ma?
jority of riff-raff; and we'll do It again,
too, if the entente cordlale between us
and the Republicans Interested in mo?
nopoly, trusts and money-domination is
not maintained In the Democratic plat?
form and Democratic candidate for
1900. Some of us in Washington have
carefully read the Post, the organ of
Hanna, his masters and their adminis?
tration, and we have eagerly consulted
McKinley, Cornetlus Bliss and Pierpont
Morgan?lineal descendant of that fa?
mous "financier" of colonial days, who,
known as "Blackbeard," bossed the
Chesapeake and its tributaries, as Pler
pont masters the banks, the trusts, the
government and their tributaries?the
people! The concurrent advice is that
we shall put up Gorman and the Cleve?
land platform of 1S92 (which hasn't got
even a silver lining), and make Bryan
and 1896 walk the plnnk!"
The Sun accepts this as a revelation
and a command, and It hugs the de?
lusion that at its wink all Democrats
will hall it and Gorman as prophets,
priests and kings! "We need not write
'cm "down."
Maladministration of Government is |
on of the grossest features of this ofii
clal-riddcn and imperialistic age, and
the minor courts of cities are called
"justice shops" In derision of the bogus
and adulterated stuff dispensed by
them. A Senatorial Committee now sit?
ting in Chicago develops the following,
as by a local paper:
"Victims of the Infamous scheme by
Justices and constables to extort money
from them told their experiences. A
Justice of the Peace?.lehn H. Bowman,
of Grossdale?was a witness and ad?
mitted the truth of most of the charges.
It was shown that poor persons are
dragged many miles from their homes
to answer trilling and frivolous law?
suits; that extortionate and Illegal
costs are Imposed; that litigants are
kept in ignorance of their legal rights,
and that injustices are daily perpetra?
ted in the name of the law. Prom the
testimony heard, nearly every Justice
In Cook county could be removed if
held to strict accountability for official
actions. A lively scene occurred dur?
ing the Interrogation of a notorious
constable named Kelly. - lie made in?
solent remarks to Attorney Burres, re?
presenting tho committee. Burres
promptly called him a liar, and Kelly,
as he left the witness stand threatened
Burres with the "best licking he ever
got" as soon as the committee leaves
town.
"Women told of being persecuted by
constables in petty cases. -One_was
compelled to go thirty-three miles to
defend a suit involving $2.50, the costs
running up to $15,03. The constable, to
satisfy the judgment, levied upon and
sold property worth $140. Another was
stripped of what little jewelry she had
to satisfy a small execution against
her. Justice Bowman tried this case
and many similar ones In which, ac?
cording to his admissions, he charged
illegal fees.
'"Don't you think you should stop this
damnable business?' inquired Attorney
Burres. 'Don't yrtu think you should
do as Judge Tuley advised?resign
your commission?"
'"I don't think my people want me to,"
replied the witness. "They know me nnd
know I would not do anything wrong.' "
KOTES AND Oi IMUK),
FROM BRYAN'S STATE
W' H. Thompson (Nebraska)?The
battle cry of the Democracy in 1900
should be the financial Question, as by
it declared in 1S96. and anti-trusts, anti
militarism. anti-Anglo-American alli?
ance. These issues should have prece?
dence in the discussions In the order
named. However, each writer and
speaker will undoubtedly be governed
by his own personal views and his im?
mediate surroundings.
COLORADO ALWAYS LOYAL.
Adalr Wilson (Colorado)?Tn my op?
inion there Is no doubt that in the next
Presidential campaign the money ques?
tion will be the leading issue, ns it was
in the last, and that bimetallism?the
restoration of silver coinage at a ratio
of 16 to 1?will be the battje cry of the
Democracy. The Democratic party has
always opposed trusts, and possibly, in
view of recent events, in its platform
of 1900 public attention may be more
forcibly called to this question, but in
no such sense as to supplant the finan?
cial Issue. The former is In fact em?
braced In the latter?is only the natural
outgrowth of the present financial
policy of the government. If you wish
to destroy an evil you must strike at Its
source. Hence to crush the trusts, re?
store bimetallism. The paramount is
sue in the campaign of 1900 will be the
same as 11 was In 1S96. The Democracy
cannot be diverted from Its purpose, by
the siren songs of those who so gener?
ously offer to build a platform for it.
The American people will again hnvfc
presented to them the same great politi?
cal issue as In 18'JG, and under such
different circumstances and conditions
that, it is believed, a fairer and more
satisfactory expression of opinion can
be had.
VOICE FROM TENNESSEE.
James M. Head (Tennessee)?In my
judgment the National Democratic con?
vention in 1900 should reaffirm every
principle laid down by the Chicago
convention in 1S9G without any trim?
ming or equivocation, .und, if possible,
in more direct and unequivocal lan?
guage. It will be impossible, even if
It might be considered advisable, to
avoid making the money question prac?
tically the lending issue of the cam?
paign. The Republican party has done
?nothing, and. in my Judgment, the next
Congress will do nothing unon the
money question. When the bill recom?
mended by the caucus committee Is In?
troduced in the next Congress the
whole financial question will, of course,
bn reopened and will be made the lead?
ing issue before that body and before
the people. Both political parties will,
no doubt, have strong declarations
against the formation of trusts, but
only that platform which goes further
and specifically points out the methods
by which trusts ore to be destroyed
will receive the confidence of the Amer?
ican people. I?y those who believe that
the g.id trust Is the parent of all
others, and that only through its de?
struction can a decisive blow be struck
at all other trusts, the free, unlimited
and independent coinage of silver at
the ratio of 16 to 1 will be assigned
the nlaco of most Importance in the
declaration of war against trusts- Tho
Democratic platform should also de?
nounced In unmeasured terms tho ac?
quisition of territory by force of arms;
should reaffirm Its allegiance to tho
principles of the Monroe doctrine, and
should demand that the declaration of
principles upon which the war with
Spain was commenced should be ad?
hered to In the settlement of all ques?
tions arising between the United States,
Cuba nnd the Philippine Islands.
NOTES AND OPINIONS.
(Editor Daniels Arraigns Money Trust.)
Josephus Daniels (North Carolina)?
the shibboleth of the campaign the
Democrats will wage In 1900 will bo
"Down with the trusts?from the gold
and national bank trust down to the
peanut ,trust." The Chicago platform
will be' reaffirmed, Bryan wttl be re
nomlnatcd, and nil men who are op?
posed to trusts of all sorts and to i
militarism will bo Invited to Join in a
struggle to restore equal opportunity,
which the trusts deny, and to crush
the attempt to saddle old world mili?
tarism upon this country. The con?
test is largely for a country for the
currency as well as a currency for the
country. In view of tho policy of
"criminal aggression" and militarism
adopted by the administration, the
struggle to rescue the republic from
destruction as a republic looms up us a
matter of the highest importance. If
militarism and colonialism are to stay,
the republic founded by the fathers
has been destroyed. The Democratic
party favors returning to the old prin?
ciple that "All governments derive
their Just powers from the consent of
the governed." The real issue in l'JOO
Is manhood against money, no matter
what special phase seems paramount.
Represented .by the' control of cur?
rency, by the organization of trusts,
by the policy of imperialism and mili?
tarism?they arc one and inseparable
?money will seek to re-elect McKin?
ley. He is tlie ngent through whom
the government lavishes favors and
special privileges upon ihe trusts and
syndicates which gave Hanna enough
money to buy the election in 1S9G.
They will raise another corruption
fund In the same way In 1900. ami will
demand greater bounties and subsi?
dies in return for their contributions.
The trusts are behind the demand for
Imperialism and si big standing army.
They wish to put the soldier over the
civilian so as to crush labor If it pro?
tests against oppression. Republican
platform declarations against trusts
will not avail against the fact that
more trusts have been organized since
McKinley was elected than in 100 yearS
previous. In Ohio the Republican plat
forn contained a declaration against
trusts. The same convention refused
to Attorney-General Monnett a renom
lnatlon. lie is tho only living Repub?
lican officeholder who tries to enforce
laws against trusts. The trusts de?
manded of Mark H:inna his head on a
oliarpter. They got It. This Incident
shows that Republican denunciation of
trusts is a sham.
WOODSON* SPKAKS FOR KEN?
TUCKY.
I "rev Woodsqn (Kentucky)?The
Dernnrratir gatherings at St. Louis and
Louisville tho last two weeks ought to
clearly show tho gold standard press
that its predictions that the Democrats
arc preparing to drop the silver issue
arc altogether erroneous, for every
speech made and every resolution
adopted was in favor of maintaining
the same firm stand for free coinage in
I'jOO as was taken In 1896. The truth
is the gold standard press Is quite well
aware that It litis been misrepresenting
the Democratic voters In making such
assertions; nor will It cease doing so
now. The gold standard press of the
country Is in league with tho Associat?
ed Press, as shown by the reports sent
out from St. Louis, to keep up such de
ceptlons In the hope of influencing
Democratic sentiment, and as there arc
few newspapers of general circulation
except those .committed to the gold
standard, and a large per cent, of the
public is always more or less credulous,
It is only through the speeches of Mr.
Bryan and other Democratic lenders at
frequent, intervals that these persistent
agents of the gold standard can be
thwarted In their conspiracy to mis?
lead. However, the great majority of
the Democratic, hosts have learned to
believe nothing they see in the gold
standard pape.-s. and with the prevail?
ing deep conviction that the silver
question is not settled and will never
be settled until silver is no longer dis?
criminated against In favor of gold, the
designs of the enemy will make no se?
rious inroads upon the Democratic or?
ganization. A year hence Bryan will
be renominateil upon the Chicago plat?
form unaltered save by such additions
with reference to trusts, imperialism
and other new issues as may seem nec?
essary.
VICTORY CERTAIN IN 1900.
Bimetallism, despite all conspiracies
on the part of Republicans to retire it,
still remains the dominant Issue. The
currency question (whether the gov?
ernment or the ?hanks shall Issue the
paper money of the country) is go?
ing to forgo to the front as one of the
burning issues In next year's ciun
jaign. The solution of these issues
q:i outlined?by?t4w?Chicago platform
(free coinage of silver at tho ratio of
16 to 1 and tho abolition of national
banks of issue) would solve the trust
question. The money trust is the par?
ent root of all trusts, and until it is
demolished tho others will flourish.
There can be no such thing as a legiti?
mate fight on the trusts without the
offer of a specific remedy. That kind
of skulduggery will be left to the Re?
publicans. They will have an anti?
trust plank, but will offer no remedy.
The Republican policy of imperial?
ism has forced another issue to the
front which la sure to be largely dis?
cussed in the campaign. But even it
Is a part of the money question. Gold
standard and imperialism go hand in
hand.
The secret alliance with England
that is now in existence brings another
important Issue to the front. It, too,
is a part of tho great financial ques?
tion.
On every hand the baneful influences
of the single gold standard are show?
ing their fruit and more than ever be?
fore the people are looking to the
great Democratic party for protection.
On the issues as outlined wo will carry
nearly every State west of the Alle
ghanies. Men of affairs who are close
observers of the trend of events see
that the days of the Republican party
are numbered.
"Mcne Mene Tekel Upharsln." It has
been weighed In the balance and found
wanting. Greed Is its doom.
Bryan, If ho lives, will be the next
President of tho United States. Even
men who wore rabid gold men In 1896
r. cognize Ulis and In all parts they are
flocking to his standard. The kind of
Influences that won the battle In 1S96
are giving up In advance tho battle of
1900. They know that they cannot win
again and are not going to try. Just
now all their efforts are being direct?
ed toward getting the Democrats to
adopt a negative policy. But their ef?
forts in that direction may be likened
unto tho seas that dash against Gib?
raltar only to recede to their level.
In the meantime the price of silver
has begun to advance. This is the
surest Indication that the money pow?
er knows what is going to happen.
Men who handle great sums of money
are quietly Investing in silver, and
there can hardly 'be any doubt but
that before the first gun is fired in
next year's campaign the commercial
and coinage ratios of the white metal
will bo about the same.
Warm Words of Com?
mendation from a
well-known Method?
ist Minister.
"I HAVES KNOWN DR. FIR ETI
AUOUT NINE YEARS while living; la
Rounoke City, HE HAVING PRAC?
TICED IN MY FAMILY DURING THAI
TIME WITH SKIDD AND SUCCESS.
Though a young man then HE ENJOYEU
THE REPUTATION OF A SKILLFUL
PAINSTAKING AND COMPETENT*
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON in the gen
erat practice of his profession. SINCE X
CAME TO NORFOLK DR. FIREY HAS
TREATED ME as a specialist FOR CA?
TARRH of tho Nose, Throat and Bron?
chial tubes with marked improvement and
by continuing his treatment I hope to be
permanently cured. As a gentleman as
well ns a physician, I REGARD DR
FI KEY IN EVERY WAY WORTHY OF
THE CONFIDENCE AND PATRONAGB
OF THE PEOPLE OF NORFOLK and I
take great pleasure in recommending him
to the public generally.
Respectfully,
REV. A. H. WAT.
No. 3 Byrd Place, Norfolk.
SINCE WRITING THE ABOVE MR.
WAY HAS DISCONTINUED TREAT?
MENT. SAYING THAT HE 'NO
LONGER FELT THE NEED OF IT.
H.ia offices 1 and 2 No. 314 Main street,
Norfolk. Va. Specialties: Catarrh and all
diseases of F.yo, Kar, Nose, Throat, Chest
and Stomach.
Hours, a b. m. to 12:39 p. m.: 2 p. rn. to
G::iO p. m. Sunday Hoars, 10:30 a. m. to
12:30 p. m. Tuesday nl?ht and Thursday
nicht. 7:30 p. m. to S p. m.
Consultation always free. Medicines
furnished. Terms always moderate. Eyes
examined for glasses free of charge.
E. L. MATKR. WM. M. WHALET.
MAYER & CO.,
Manufacturers' Agents, Importers a,ad
Dealers In
MACHINERY
ar.d supplies. Tools, Shafting and Pulleys,
ICiiKlnes and Boilers. Pumps, Injectors,
Syphones Hose. Iron Plpo and Fittings
Valves, Cocks. &c. Saws, Rafting Gear,
Molls. Nuts. Washers. Belting. Packing.
Wa3te. Iron. Steel. Nails. Oils. Cordage.
We guarantee the quality of our good!
nnd also prompt delivery, and with In?
creased facilities we afe prepared to meet
all competitors. Inquiries and orders ao
l!r!Ud.
38 COMMERCIAL PLACE.
NORFOLK.VIRGINIA
lul?-tou-ly
THE HENRY WALKE CO.,
SAW HILL,
And Railroad Supplies,
HARDWARE AND SHIP CHANDLERY
"fyant" and "Giant Planer," Leather
i Belting. "Giant," "Granite," and "Shaw
, nut" Rubber Belting.
Afront for Knowles* Steam Pumping
Machine.
W.H, TAYLOR &C0.,
224 Water Street.
RAILROAD. STEAMBOAT AND MIL 14
SUPPLIES.
Agents for this section for the sale of
Graton & Knight's Leather Belting. New
York Boitins: and Packing Company's
Rubber Goods. Knowlton's Patent Pack?
ing. Snow Steam Pumos. my7-lm
Norfolk Iron Works,
GEO. W. DUVAL & CO.,
1_S?. 15 WATER STREET:?NORFOLK.
ENGINES, BOILERS. SAWMILL and
all kinds of machinery of the most Im?
proved patterns. Also repairing at the
shortest notice. Particular attention to
steamboat work. DUVALS PATENT
BOILER TUBE FERRULES are th?
only perfect remedy for leaky boiler
tubes. They can be Inserted In a few
minutes by any engineer, and axe war*
ranted to stop leaks.
SLAB WOOD I
?GUARANTEED DRY AT?
C. E3. WHITE'S
147 KELLY AVENUE,
Special Price for Large Quantities,
Both phones. my23-oed6m
BEFORE THE WAR,
PLEASE SEND ME A ROAST OF BEEF.
SINCE THE WAR,
SEND ME A ROAST OF HOME KILLED BEEF
No danger, we have none but our
I own k lied Beef, Veal, Lamb and
Pork, Lard, Saussage, etc.
OPEN ALL DAY, BOTH PHONES.
J.S. Bell, Jr.&Co.,
Corner Queen and Church Sts.
OLD PHONE S35. NEW PHONE 1010.
FOR 60LD SUPPER
WE HAVE WHAT YOU WANT.
Lobster Salmon, Lunch Tongue, 8sr
dlnes Canned Chicken. Potted Ham and
Tongiie. Also full line of Pickles, Mus?
tard and Catsup. Helntz Best Pure Ap?
ple Vinegar. 25c. gallon. Helnts White
Wine Vinegar 30c. gallon. Keep coo* and
buy tho above of
VIRGINIA GROCERY GO..
61 and $3 New Market Mm*
PHONES ?2.

xml | txt